No. 206 Squadron RAF


No. 206 Squadron RAF
No. 206 Squadron RAF
Active 31 Dec 1916(RNAS)- 27 Aug 1917
1 Nov 1917 - 31 Mar 1918
1 Apr 1918(RAF)- 1 Feb 1920
15 Jun 1936 - 25 Apr 1946
17 Nov 1947 - 31 Aug 1949
1 Dec 1949 - 20 Feb 1950
27 Sep 1952 - 1 Apr 2005
1 Apr 2009 - Present
Country United Kingdom United Kingdom
Branch Ensign of the Royal Air Force.svg Royal Air Force
Base RAF Boscombe Down
Motto Latin: Nihil nos effugit
("Nothing Escapes Us")
Battle honours Western Front 1916-1918*
Arras 1917*
Lys
Channel and North Sea 1939-1945*
Dunkirk*
Atlantic 1939 and 1941-1945*
Fortress Europe 1940 and 1942*
German Ports 1940 and 1942
Biscay 1941 and 1943-1944*
Bismarck*
Baltic 1945
South Atlantic 1982
Gulf 1991
Iraq 2003
The honours marked with an asterix(*) are those emblazoned on the squadron standard[1][2]
Insignia
Badge An Octopus[3][4][5][6]
The Octopus, with its many legs and quick activity, sybolises the squadron's efforts in many branches of Service work[7]
Squadron Codes WD (Nov 1938 - Sep 1939)[8][9]
VX (Sep 1939 - Mar 1944)[10][11]
PQ (Apr 1944 - Apr 1946)[12][13]
B (Sep 1952 - May 1958)[14][15]

No. 206 Squadron was a Royal Air Force unit employed, until 2005, in the maritime patrol role with the Nimrod MR.2 at RAF Kinloss, Moray. It was announced in December 2004 that 206 Squadron would disband on 1 April 2005, with half of its crews being redistributed to Nos. 120 and 201 Squadrons, also stationed at Kinloss. This was a part of the UK Defence Review called Delivering Security in a Changing World; the Nimrod MR.2 fleet was reduced in number from 21 to 16 as a consequence.

Contents

History

Formation and early years

No. 206 Squadron was formed on 31 December 1916 as No. 6 Squadron, Royal Naval Air Service, a fighter unit operating Nieuport 17s and later Sopwith Camels over the Western Front before disbanding on 27 August 1917.[16] The squadron was reformed in 1 January 1918 as a bomber and reconnaissance unit, operating Airco DH9s. With the establishment of the RAF in 1918 the squadron was renumbered No. 206 Squadron, RAF, being used for photo-reconnaissance in support of the British Second Army and for bombing support during the Allies final offensive. Following the Armistice it was used to operate an air mail service for the British occupying army in Germany, before being deployed to Helwan, Egypt in June 1919. It was renumbered as 47 Squadron on 1 February 1920.[17]

Flying ace Major (later Group Captain) Ernest Norton served in the squadron during World War I, [18]as did Albert Gregory Waller.[19]

Interbellum and World War II

A 206 Sqn. Lockheed Hudson over the North Sea in 1940.

The squadron was again reformed on 15 June 1936, with Avro Ansons as part of the new RAF Coastal Command, initially as a training squadron but later assigned to maritime patrols. It operated from RAF Bircham Newton in the early years of World War II, managing to shoot down a Heinkel He 115 floatplane and attack a German submarine before re-equipping with the Lockheed Hudson in March 1940. It converted to the Boeing Fortress Mk.II in July 1942, allowing long range patrols over the Atlantic, moving to the Azores during October 1943, before returning to the United Kingdom for re-equipping with the Consolidated Liberator Mk.VI, later augmented by the Liberators Mk.VIII.[20] The Squadron's Liberators were based at RAF St Eval until after D-Day, when the unit moved North to RAF Leuchars. A section was detached to West Africa for anti-submarine and convoy patrols as No. 200 Squadron RAF. Detachments also operated from bases such as RAF St Eval in Cornwall and RAF Aldergrove in County Antrim. The squadron was disbanded on 25 April 1946.

Post-war

It was reformed on 17 November 1947, flying Avro York C.1 transport aircraft, but again disbanded on 31 August 1949. It was soon reformed on 1 December 1949, flying Douglas Dakotas, the military transport version of the well-known Douglas DC-3 airliner. This lated only till 20 February 1950 however. Reformed yet again on 27 September 1952 on Avro Shackletons, the squadron moved to RAF Kinloss in 1965 and was equipped with Hawker-Siddeley Nimrods in 1970. It continued to operate the Nimrod until disbanding on 1 April 2005.

Present

On 1 April 2009, the Heavy Aircraft Test & Evaluation Squadron at Boscombe Down (Air Warfare Centre) gained the 206 Squadron numberplate, as 206 (Reserve) Squadron. Currently split between RAF Boscombe Down and RAF Brize Norton 'B Flt' C130 specialists moved from RAF Lyneham in June 2011 to their new home at RAF Brize Norton in Oxfordshire to continue the Hercules Test and Evaluation process.

Aircraft operated

data from [7][21][22][23][24][25]
From To Aircraft Version
Dec 1916 Jun 1917 Nieuport 17
Jun 1917 Aug 1917 Sopwith Camel
Jan 1918 Mar 1918 Airco D.H.4
Feb 1918 Jan 1920 Airco D.H.9
Jun 1936 Jun 1940 Avro Anson Mk.I
Mar 1940 Aug 1942 Lockheed Hudson Mk.I
Apr 1941 Jun 1941 Lockheed Hudson Mk.II
Apr 1941 Aug 1942 Lockheed Hudson Mk.III
Apr 1941 Aug 1941 Lockheed Hudson Mk.IV
Jun 1941 Aug 1942 Lockheed Hudson Mk.V
Jul 1942 Apr 1944 Boeing Fortress Mks.II, IIA
Apr 1944 Apr 1946 Consolidated Liberator Mk.VI
Mar 1945 Apr 1946 Consolidated Liberator Mk.VIII
Nov 1947 Feb 1950 Avro York C.1
Jan 1950 Feb 1950 Douglas Dakota C.4
Sep 1952 May 1958 Avro Shackleton MR.1A
Feb 1953 Jun 1954 Avro Shackleton MR.2
Jan 1958 Oct 1970 Avro Shackleton MR.3
Nov 1970 Sep 1979 Hawker-Siddeley Nimrod MR.1
Oct 1979 Apr 2005 Hawker-Siddeley Nimrod MR.2

See also

References

Notes

  1. ^ Halley 1973, p. 8.
  2. ^ http://www.rafweb.org/Sqn206-210.htm
  3. ^ Halley 1973, p. 5.
  4. ^ Rawlings 1982, p. 136
  5. ^ Halley 1988, p. 266.
  6. ^ Moyes 1976, p. 193.
  7. ^ a b Rawlings 1978, p. 321.
  8. ^ Bowyer & Rawlings 1979, p. 13.
  9. ^ Flintham & Thomas 2003, p. 52.
  10. ^ Bowyer & Rawlings 1979, p. 106.
  11. ^ Flintham & Thomas 2003, p. 115.
  12. ^ Bowyer & Rawlings 1979, p. 83.
  13. ^ Flintham & Thomas 2003, p. 97.
  14. ^ Bowyer & Rawlings 1979, p. 127.
  15. ^ Flintham & Thomas 2003, p. 192.
  16. ^ Lewis 1959, p. 71.
  17. ^ Ashworth 1989, p. 192.
  18. ^ Nieuport Aces of World War I. p. 12. 
  19. ^ http://www.theaerodrome.com/aces/ireland/waller.php Retrieved 4 May 2011.
  20. ^ Ashworth 1989, pp. 192—193.
  21. ^ Halley 1973, p. 84.
  22. ^ Jefford 2001, p. 71.
  23. ^ Moyes 1976, p. 194.
  24. ^ Halley 1988, p. 267.
  25. ^ Rawlings 1982, p. 137.

Bibliography

  • Ashworth, Chris. Encyclopedia of Modern Royal Air Force Squadrons. Wellingborough, UK: Patrick Stevens Limited, 1989. ISBN 1-85260-013-6.
  • Bowyer, Michael J.F and John D.R. Rawlings. Squadron Codes, 1937-56. Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, UK: Patrick Stephens Ltd., 1979. ISBN 0-85059-364-6.
  • Flintham, Vic and Andrew Thomas. Combat Codes: A Full Explanation and Listing of British, Commonwealth and Allied Air Force Unit Codes Since 1938. Shrewsbury, Shropshire, UK: Airlife Publishing Ltd., 2003. ISBN 1-84037-281-8.
  • Franks, Norman. Nieuport Aces of World War I. Osprey Publishing, 2000. ISBN 1855329611, 9781855329614.
  • Halley, James J. Famous Maritime Squadrons of the RAF, Volume 1. Windsor, Berkshire, UK: Hylton Lacy Publishers Ltd., 1973. ISBN 0-85064-101-2.
  • Halley, James J. The Squadrons of the Royal Air Force & Commonwealth, 1918-1988. Tonbridge, Kent, UK: Air-Britain (Historians) Ltd., 1988. ISBN 0-85130-164-9.
  • Jefford, Wing Commander C.G., MBE,BA,RAF (Retd). RAF Squadrons, a Comprehensive Record of the Movement and Equipment of all RAF Squadrons and their Antecedents since 1912. Shrewsbury, Shropshire, UK: Airlife Publishing Ltd., 2001. ISBN 1-84037-141-2.
  • Lewis, Peter. Squadron Histories: R.F.C, R.N.A.S and R.A.F., 1912-59. London: Putnam, 1959.
  • Moyes, Philip J.R. Bomber Squadrons of the RAF and their Aircraft. London: Macdonald and Jane's (Publishers) Ltd., 1964 (new edition 1976). ISBN 0-354-01027-1.
  • Rawlings, John D.R. Coastal, Support and Special Squadrons of the RAF and their Aircraft. London: Jane's Publishing Company Ltd., 1982. ISBN 0-7106-0187-5.
  • Rawlings, John D.R. Fighter Squadrons of the RAF and their Aircraft. London: Macdonald and Jane's (Publishers) Ltd., 1969 (new edition 1976, reprinted 1978). ISBN 0-354-01028-X.
  • Westrop, Mike. History of no. 6 Squadron Royal Naval Air Service in World War I. Atglen, Pennsylvania; Schiffer Publishing, 2006. ISBN 0-7643-2425-X.

External links


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