No. 268 Squadron RAF


No. 268 Squadron RAF
No. 268 Squadron RAF
Active 1918-1919
1940-1945
1945-1946
Country United Kingdom
Branch Royal Air Force
Motto Adjidaumo

No. 268 Squadron RAF was a Second World War Royal Air Force squadron that operated the North American Mustang on missions over occupied Europe and in support of the D-Day landings.

Contents

History

The squadron was formed in August 1918 at Kalafrana, Malta from No. 433 and 434 Flights of the Royal Naval Air Service operating the Short 184 and Short 320 torpedo carrying floatplanes. It operated patrols in the mediterranean until the end of the First World War and was disbanded on the 11 October 1919.

On the 30 November 1940 the squadron reformed at RAF Bury St.Edmunds with the Westland Lysander. It first flew anti-invasion sorties along the English coastline but the primary role was tactical reconnaissance. The squadron deployed to RAF Penshurst from 4 to 8 August 1941. It started operations with the Curtiss Tomahawk in October 1941 but these were replaced in April 1942 with the more capable North American Mustang. It converted to the Hawker Typhoon in July 1944 and continued to support the D-Day landings with tactical reconnaissance sorties. However, these proved unsuitable, and were replaced by Mustang MkII aircraft by Nov 1944. A further change in aircraft was effected in Sept 1945 when the Mustangs were replaced by Spitfire XIV. The squadron acquired Spitfire IXs from 16 Squadron only to be disbanded on 19 September 1945 when it was re-numbered to 16 Squadron.

Shortly afterwards on 26 October 1945 the former 487 Squadron was re-numbered as 268 Squadron. Based at Cambrai/Epinoy it was equipped with the twin-engined de Havilland Mosquito FB6 for use in the light bomber role before being finally dibanded on 31 March 1946.

Aircraft operated

[1]

Dates Aircraft Variant Notes
1918-1919 Short 184 Single-engined torpedo seaplane
1918-1919 Short 320 Single-engined torpedo seaplane
1940-1942 Westland Lysander II and then III Single-engined liaison
1941-1942 Curtiss Tomahawk IIA Single-engined fighter
1942-1944 North American Mustang I then IA Single-engined fighter
1944 Hawker Typhoon FR IB Single-engined fighter
1944-1945 North American Mustang II
1945 Supermarine Spitfire XIVe and XIX Single-engined fighter
1945-1946 de Havilland Mosquito VI Twin-engined light bomber

Notes

  1. ^ Jefford 1988, page 81

References

  • The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft (Part Work 1982-1985). Orbis Publishing. 1985. 
  • Jefford, C.G. (1988). RAF Squadrons. Airlife Publishing Ltd. ISBN 1 85310 053 6. 

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