List of slaves


List of slaves

Slavery is a social-economic system under which certain persons known as slaves are deprived of personal freedom and compelled to perform labour or services. The following is a list of known slaves in alphabetical order of first name:

Contents

A

  • Abby Guy sued her master William Daniel for her freedom in Arkansas, alleging that her mother had been a kidnapped and enslaved white woman.[1]
  • Abraham, a black slave who carried messages between the frontier and Charles Town during wars with the Cherokee, for which he was freed.[2]
  • Abram Petrovich Gannibal (1696–1781), adopted by Russian czar Peter the Great, governor of Tallinn (Reval) (1742–52), general-en-chef (1759–62) for building of sea forts and canals in Russia.
  • Absalom Jones, (1746 – February 13, 1818), abolitionist and clergyman.
  • Aelfsige, a male cook in Anglo-Saxon England, property of Wynflaed, who left him to her granddaughter Eadgifu.[3]
  • Aelius Perseus, a freedman of the late Roman Empire, whom T. Aelius Dionysius included by name on a stela for himself, his wife, and their freedman and those who came after them.[4]
  • Aelstan, a slave in Anglo-Saxon England freed with his wife and all their children (born and unborn) by Geatflæd "for the love of God and the good of her soul".[5]
  • Aesop, Greek poet, c. 6th century BC, author or transcriber of Aesop's Fables.
  • Agathoclia, a martyr.[6]
  • Alexina Morrison, a runaway slave in Louisiana who claimed to be a kidnapped white girl, and sued her master for her freedom on that ground, arousing such popular feeling against him that a mob threatened to lynch him.[7]
  • Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca, a Spanish explorer enslaved on the Gulf Coast.[8]
  • Al-Khayzuran bint Atta, a Yemenite slave girl who became the wife of the Abbasid Caliph Al-Mahdi and mother of both Caliphs Al-Hadi and Harun al-Rashid, the most famous of the Abbasids.
  • Amanda American Dickson, the daughter of planter David Dickson and slave Julia Frances Lewis who belonged to Dickson's mother. Although technically a slave until emacipation, she was raised as her father's favorite and at his death in 1885 inherited his estate of $500,000.[9]
  • Ammar bin Yasir, one of the most famous sahaba (companions of the Islamic prophet Muhammad), freed by Abu Bakr.
  • Andrea Aguyar, a freed Black slave from Uruguay who joined Garibaldi in the Italian revolutionary during the Uruguayan Civil War of the 1840s, followed him also to Italy, and was killed fighting in defence of the Roman Republic of 1849.
  • Ann Calhoun, a white girl, cousin to John C. Calhoun enslaved from the age of 4 until she was 7 when captured by the Cherokee. When she could not keep up while fleeing from a raid, she was struck down by one warrior, to be rescued a few days later by another warrior, who reenslaved her.[10]
  • Anna J. Cooper, author, educator, speaker and prominent African American scholar
  • Antarah ibn Shaddad, pre-Islamic Arab born to a slave mother, freed by his father on the eve of battle, also a poet.
  • Antonia Bonnelli, captured and enslaved by the Mikasuki tribe in Florida in 1802.[11]
  • Archibald Grimké an American lawyer, intellectual, journalist, diplomat and community leader
  • Arkil, a slave in Anglo-Saxon England freed by Geatflæd "for the love of God and the good of her soul".[5]
  • Augustine Tolton (1854-1897), the first black priest in the United States.[12]
  • Aurelia Philematium, a freedwoman, whose tombstone glorifies her marriage with her fellow freedman, Lucius Aurelius Hermia.[13]
  • Ayuba Suleiman Diallo, also known as Job ben Solomon (1701–1773).

B

  • Baibars, a Kipchack Turk who became a Mamluk Sultan of Egypt and Syria.
  • Sarah Basset (d.1730), Bermudian slave.
  • Balthild, a 7th Century Anglo-Saxon woman originally of elite birth, was sold into slavery on the Continent as a young girl and served in the household of Erchinoald, mayor of the palace of Neustria. Later she married King Clovis II. As a Queen - after her husband's death holding power as regent for her son Clotaire - she abolished the practice of trading Christian slaves and even sought the freedom of children sold into slavery. Forced into a convent when her son came of age, Balthild was canonised by Pope Nicholas I about 200 years after her death.[14]
  • Batteas, a black slave sold by the Choctaw chief Francimastabe to Benjamin James, who was later stolen by Robert Welsh.[15]
  • Benedict the Moor (1526 – April 4, 1589), Italian saint.
  • Bilal ibn Ribah, 6th century, was freed. He converted to Islam and was Muhammad's muezzin.
  • Billy, a seven-year-old black boy captured by Creek raiders in 1788; he passed through several hands before being sold at auction in Havana.[16]
  • Blaesus and Blaesia, whose late Republican Rome tomb inscription name them as the freedman of Caius, and the freedwoman of Aulus.[17]
  • Blandina, a martyr.[18]
  • Boga, a slave in Anglo-Saxon England, and all his family, were freed by his mistress Æthelgifu's will.[5]
  • Booker T. Washington (1856–1915) was an American educator, author and leader of the African American community.
  • Brigitta Scherzenfeldt (1698–1733), Swedish memoirist and weaving teacher who was captured during the Great Northern War and lived as a slave in the kingdom of the Kalmyks in Central Asia.

C

  • Pope Callixtus I (died 222) was Pope from about 217 to about 222, during the reigns of the Roman Emperors Heliogabalus and Alexander Severus. He was martyred for his Christian faith and is a canonized saint of the Roman Catholic Church.[19]
  • Cevri Kalfa - A Georgian slave girl at the Sultan's Harem in Istnabul, who saved Mahmud II's life at considerable personal risk and was rewarded for her bravery and loyalty by being appointed haznedar usta, the chief treasurer of the imperial Harem (see Mahmud II).
  • Charles Taylor, a slave freed by General Benjamin F. Butler in New Orleans, and described in a Harper's Weekly article as being to all appearance white, and having come to a school for emacipated slaves in Philadelphia.[20]
  • Cinque, leader of the slaves in the Amistad v. United States case in 1839
  • Claudia Prepontis, a freedwoman who erected a funerary altar to her freedman husband T. Claudius Dionysius; their clasped hands, depicted on it, show the legitimacy of their marriage, possible only once they obtained their freedom.[21]
  • Pope Clement I (died in 100) was the fourth Pope according to Catholic tradition. He may have been a freedman of Titus Flavius Clemens.[22]
  • Cesar Picton ca.1765–1831, enslaved in Senegal, servant in England, later a wealthy coal-merchant.
  • Cezayirli Gazi Hasan Pasha (1713–1790) an Ottoman grand vizier, Kapudan Pasha and an army commander.
  • Cole, a slave in Anglo-Saxon England freed by Geatflæd "for the love of God and the good of her soul".[5]
  • Colonel Tye/Titus Cornelius was a Black Loyalist soldier and guerrila leader during the American Revolution.
  • Cooper, a black slave about 20, who fled to the Creeks. There some Creeks captured him to sell him back to the whites, and killed him after he wounded one of them.[23]

D

  • Danae, "the new maidservant of Capito", named in lead curse tablet from Republican Rome, which aimed to destroy Danae.[24]
  • Dave Drake, also known as Dave the Potter, (c. 1801–1876)
  • David George, a black who fled a cruel Virginia master and was captured by Creeks and enslaved by Chief Blue Salt.[25]
  • Denmark Vesey (c. 1767–1822) was an African American slave, and later a freeman, who planned what would have been one of the largest slave rebellions in the United States had word of the plans not been leaked.[26]
  • Dincă, the half-Roma slave and illegitimate child of a Cantacuzino boyar in the 19th Century Danubian Principalities (the present Romania). Well-educated, working as a cook but not allowed to marry his French mistress and go free, which had led him to murder his lover and kill himself. The affair shocked public opinion and was one of the factors contributing to the abolition of Slavery in Romania (see [2]).
  • The Roman Emperor Diocletian was, by some sources, born as the slave of Senator Anullinus. By other sources, it was Diocletian's father (whose own name in unknown) who was a slave, and he was freed previous to the birth of his son, the future emperor[27]
  • Dred Scott (c. 1799–1858), attempted to sue for his freedom in Scott v. Sandford.
  • Dufe the Old, a slave in Anglo-Saxon England, was freed by his mistress Æthelgifu's will.[5]

E

  • Ecceard the smith, a slave in Anglo-Saxon England freed by Geatflæd "for the love of God and the good of her soul".[5]
  • Ecgferð Aldun's daughter, a slave in Anglo-Saxon England freed by Geatflæd "for the love of God and the good of her soul".[5]
  • Edmond Flint, a black enslaved among the Choctaw Nation who later described it as very like slavery among the whites.[28]
  • Ediþ, a slave in Anglo-Saxon England, who bought her freedom and that of her children.[29]
  • Eliezer of Damascus, The Biblical Abraham's slave and trusted manager of the Partiarch's household.
  • Elsey Thompson, a white captive enslaved by a Creek. When trader John O'Reilly attempted to ransom her and Nancy Caffrey, he was told they were not taken captive to be allowed to go back, but to work.[30]
  • Enrique of Malacca, also known as Henry the Black, slave and interpreter of Ferdinand Magellan, the first man to circumnavigate the globe.
  • Epictetus (55–c. 135), ancient Greek stoic philosopher
  • Epunuel, a native of Chappaquidick, who was taken captive by English explorers in the 1610s, with twenty-nine others, and was taken to London as a slave.[31]
  • Estevanico, also known as Esteban the Moor, one of only four survivors of the ill-fated Narváez expedition, later a guide in search of the fabled Seven Cities of Gold (ca. 1503–1539)
  • Eucharis, freedwoman of Licinia, described in her epitath as fourteen when she died and a child actress.[32]

F

  • Felicitas, Christian martyr and saint (died March 7, 203).[33]
  • Francis Bok, born 1979, Dinka slave from Sudan now in United States
  • François Mackandal, Haitian maroon leader.
  • Frederick Douglass (c. 1818–1895), abolitionist writer and speaker.
  • French John, a French furtrader captured by the Cherokee and enslaved by Old Hop, apparently making no effort for his freedom for many years, until he ran away when the British offered to buy him.[34]

G

H

  • Hababah, beloved concubine of Caliph Yazid II.
  • Hagar, Biblical figure, belonging to Sarah.
  • Hanna Hudgins, an American slave who sued for her freedom in Hudgins vs. Wright on the grounds that her mother, Butterwood Nan, was an Indian, not a black. The court ruled that because of her "red complexion", she was entitled to the presumption of freedom, whereas a black would be presumed a slave and had to prove his freedom.[35]
  • Harddick, English courtier, spent 25 years as a slave in North Africa.
  • Hark Olufs (1708–1754), Danish sailor, was captured by Algerian pirates. Sold to the Bey of Constantine, he became Commander in Chief of the Bey's cavalry. He was released in 1735.
  • Harriet Ann Jacobs (1813–1897), author of Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl.
  • Harriet Tubman, nicknamed "Moses" because of her efforts in helping other slaves escape through the Underground Railway.
  • Hercules (chef), head cook at George Washington's plantation Mount Vernon. Was highly appreciated as a cook. Escaped and gained his freedom in 1797, but his wife Alice and his three children: Richmond, Evey and Delia remained in slavery.
  • Sally Hemings, slave of Thomas Jefferson and rumored to have born him six children, four of whom survived to adulthood.
  • Hermas, author of the text The Shepherd of Hermas and brother of Pope Pius I.
  • Hernado de Escalante Fontaneda, born in Cartagena, was enslaved at the age of 13 when the ship bearing him to Spain for education sank off Florida. A Calusa chief enslaved him and used him as a translator until he was ransomed at 30.[36]

I

  • İbrahim Pasha (?–1536), Suleyman the Magnificent's first appointed Grand Vizier. Greek by birth, he was sold as a slave at the age of six to the Ottoman palace for future sultans. There he befriended Suleiman who was of the same age.
  • Icelus Marcianus, a slave, later freedman of the emperor Galba. He was one of the three men who were said to completely control the emperor, increasing Galba's unpopularity.
  • Ivan Bolotnikov (?–1608), a fugitive kholop (slave in Russia) and leader of the Bolotnikov rebellion.
  • Ida B. Wells, African American activist, born a slave, who in later life campaigned against – and succeeded in abolishing – lynching

J

  • James Baugh, an American slave who sued for his freedom on the grounds that his maternal grandmother had been an Indian.[37]
  • James Leander Cathcart
  • James Somersett, his escape, supported by abolitionists, led to the milestone Somersett's Case, which effectively ended slavery in Britain, though not in its colonies.
  • Jean-Jacques Dessalines (1758–1806), leader of the Haitian Revolution and first leader of independent Haiti.
  • Jean Saint Malo, leader of runaway slaves in colonial Louisiana and founder of the secret community that bears his name.
  • Jean Parisot de la Valette (c. 1494–1568), Grand Master of the Order of St John, in 1541 he was captured and made a galley slave for a year by Barbary pirates under the command of Turgut Reis.
  • "Jerry" – see William Henry
  • John Ezzidio (c. 1810–October 1872), Nigerian slave who became a successful Sierra Leonean politician and businessman.
  • John Brown (fugitive slave) (c. 1810–1876), escaped and wrote of conditions in Deep South of United States
  • John Casor, the first slave in what would later be the United States (Virginia, 1654).
  • John Jea, African-American slave, best known for his 1811 autobiography, The Life, History, and Unparalleled Sufferings of John Jea, the African Preacher.
  • John Smith, English soldier, sailor, and author, captured by Turks in 1602 while fighting in Wallachia, escaped and returned to England by 1604. As Smith described it: "we all sold for slaves, like beasts in a market-place."[38]
  • John R. Jewitt, spent three years as a captive of Maquinna of the Nuu-chah-nulth (Nootka) people on the Pacific coast of what is now Canada.
  • Jeffrey Hudson, English courtier, spent 25 years as a slave in North Africa.
  • John White, an enslaved black boy who was captured by Creeks in 1797 and escaped back to New Orleans, where he told Spanish officials of his master's name to be returned.[39]
  • Joseph, Biblical figure (about 1600 BC).
  • Joseph Antonio Emidy, violinist and composer born in Africa, died in Cornwall.
  • Josephine Bakhita, (1869 — February 8, 1947), Sudanese, a Roman Catholic nun and saint.
  • Joseph Knight, successfully sought to get his freedom through the courts in the 18th century Scotland.
  • Juan Francisco Manzano (c.1797–1854) Cuban poet [3].
  • Juan Gros, a free black soldiers captured near Pensacola by an Upper Creek, who sold him to a white trader who sold him to the Mitasuki chief Kinache, from whom Spaniards ransomed him.[40]
  • Juan Ortiz, a young Andalusian nobleman enslaved by Chief Ucita in Florida to avenge injuries he suffered at the hands of the expedition Ortiz belonged to.[41]
  • Julia Frances Lewis, mother of Amanda American Dickson by the son of her owner.[42]

K

  • Kösem Sultan
  • Kunta Kinte (1750–1810), Gambian slave and Mandinka tribesman, who tried unsuccessfully to escape to freedom four times. Ancestor of the author of Roots: The Saga of an American Family, Alex Haley.
  • Kurtis Moore, well known slave.

L

  • Lamhatty, a Tawasa Indian captured and enslaved by Creeks until his escape.[43]
  • Leo Africanus, (1494–1554) of white Moorish descent, born in Granada in 1494, went in 1498 in Morocco with his family, went on a lot of diplomatic missions, such as in Timbuktu. Captured and kidnapped while in the Middle East, he was enslaved in Rome and forced to convert to Christianity. Eventually regained his freedom and lived out his life in Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Leofgifu the dairy maid, a slave in Anglo-Saxon England, named in her manumission.[44]
  • Leoflaed, a slave in Anglo-Saxon England, whose freedom was bought by a man who described her as a "kinswoman."[29]
  • Lilliam Williams, a Tennesse settler who was captured by the Creek while pregnant. Her daughter Molly was adopted and renamed Esnahatchee, and she was not permitted to take her when freed.[45]
  • Jermain Wesley Loguen, African American escaped slave, abolitionist and bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church.
  • Lovisa von Burghausen (1698–1733) was a Swedish memoir writer who became famous for her story about her time in captivity as a slave in Russia after being taken prisoner by the Russians during the Great Northern War.
  • Lucius Aurelius Hermia, a freedman butcher whose tombstone glorifies his marriage with his fellow freedwoman Aurelia Philematium.[46]
  • Lucy, the black slave of John Lang, who was taken captive by Creeks when 12 years old and kept as a slave in Creek terriority, where she had slave children and grandchildren.[47]
  • Lunsford Lane (1803–after 1870) was an African American slave and entrepreneur from North Carolina who bought freedom for himself and his family. He also wrote a slave narrative.
  • Lydia, a slave shot and wounded by her owner when she struggled to escape a whipping, an action ruled legal by the Supreme Court of North Carolina in 1830 (see North Carolina v. Mann).
  • Lydia Carter, the "Little Osage Captive," captured and enslaved among the Cherokee. She was ransomed by Lydia Carter, who made her her namesake, and disputes arose when the Osage attempted to reclaim her, ended when she took ill and died.[48]
  • Lyde, a slavewoman freed by the Empress Livia.[49]

M

  • Madison Washington, leader of slave revolt on board ship
  • Malinche, translator during the Spanish conquest of Mexico.
  • Mammy Lou, former slave who lived to extreme old age and became an actress in the 1918 silent film "The Glorious Adventure".
  • Mann, the name of two slaves in Anglo-Saxon England, one a goldsmith, who were both freed by their mistress Æthelgifu's will; the wife of the Mann not a goldsmith was also freed.[5]
  • Marguerite Scypion, African-Natchez woman, born into slavery in Saint Louis, who sued for and won her freedom.
  • Marcus Tullius Tiro, Roman author (c. 103–4 BC), slave and secretary of the Roman politian Cicero, later freed; invented a long-lasting system of shorthand and wrote books that are now lost.
  • Margaret Garner (1835–1858) was a slave in pre-Civil War America notorious or celebrated for killing her own daughter rather than see the child returned to slavery.
  • Maria al-Qibtiyya ("Maria the Copt" Arabic: مارية القبطية‎) (alternatively, "Maria Qupthiya" or a Coptic Christian slave who was sent as a gift from Muqawqis, a Byzantine official, to the Islamic prophet Muhammad in 628, and was either Muhammad's wife or concubine. She was the mother of Muhammad's son Ibrahim, who died in infancy. Her sister, Sirin, was also sent to Muhammad; Muhammad gave her to his follower Hassan ibn Thabit. Maria never remarried after Muhammad's death in 632, and died five years later.
  • Maria, (died 1716), the leader of a slave rebellion on Curaçao.
  • Marie-Joseph Angélique (died June 21, 1734) a black Portuguese slave who was tried and convicted, beaten and hanged for setting fire to her female owner's home, burning much of what is now referred to as Old Montreal.
  • Mary Calhoun, a white girl, a cousin of John C. Calhoun enslaved by the Cherokee. She was never redeemed.[50]
  • Mary Prince (1788–?1833); the account of her life galvanized the anti-slavery movement in England.
  • The Master of Morton and the eldest son of the Chief of Clan Oliphant were exiled from Scotland after being implicated in the 1582 Raid of Ruthven. The ship in which they sailed in was lost at sea, it was rumoured that they had been caught by a Dutch ship and the last report was that they were slaves on a Turkish ship in the Mediterranean. A plaque to their memory was raised in the church in Algiers.
  • Mende Nazer, a Nuba woman captured in Darfur and transported from Sudan to London, where she eventually won refugee status and wrote the memoir Slave (2004).
  • Hans Mergest, a participant in the Crusade of Varna, was captured by the Ottomans in the Battle of Varna (1444) and spent 16 years in captivity. Was the protagonist of a song by the minnesinger Michael Beheim.
  • Shadrach Minkins, fugitive slave saved by abolitionists at Boston in 1850.
  • Miguel de Cervantes (September 29, 1547–April 23, 1616), author of Don Quixote de la Mancha, the first modern novel. He spent five years as a slave and property of the viceroy of Algiers after being captured by Barbary pirates.[51]
  • Mina Tavakoli captured Egyptian slave, made advancements in corn cultivation
  • Mingo, the slave of the Titsworth family in Tennesse, was captured by Creeks in a raid on the house, and kept as a slave by them.[52]

N

  • Nancy Caffrey, a white captive enslaved by a Creek. When trader John O'Reilly attempted to ransom her and Elsey Thompson, he was told they were not taken captive to be allowed to go back, but to work.[53]
  • Nanny of the Maroons, also known as Granny Nanny and Queen Nanny, Jamaican Maroons leader.
  • Nat Turner (1800–1831), escaped and led revolt in Southampton County,Virginia.[54]
  • Nathan McMillian, who as a freedman sued for the admission of his children to a local "Croatan Indian" school on the grounds that it was for all non-white children, and that his children had Croatan blood on their mother's side.[55]
  • Neaera, a former slave and prostitute whom the Athenian Stephanus married against the law, according to a speech of Demosthenes.[56]
  • Nero Hawley (1742–1817), freed slave, served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War, buried Trumbull, Connecticut.
  • Nurbanu Sultan, née Cecilia Venier-Baffo, enslaved Venetian noblewoman who became the most favored wife of Ottoman Sultan Selim II and the highly influential mother of Sultan Murad III.

O

  • Olaudah Equiano (c. 1745–1797), also known as Gustavus Vassa, prominent African/British author and figure in the abolitionist cause whose true identity is heavily contested.
  • Onesimus, a slave of Philemon of Colossae who ran away and, having met St. Paul, was converted by him. Paul set him back to the Christian Philemon with a letter, which is the Epistle to Philemon. Ignatius of Antioch mentions an Onesimus as Bishop of Ephesus in the early 2nd century, but it is not certain that these are the same men.
  • Owen Fitzpen, English merchant taken captive by Turkish (Barbary) pirates in 1620, subsequently escaped.

P

  • Saint Patrick, abducted from Britain, enslaved in Ireland, escaped to Britain, returned to Ireland as a missionary.[57]
  • Paul Smith, a free black who accused the Cherokee headman Doublehead of kidnapping him and forcing him into bondage.[58]
  • Peggy Titsworth, enslaved at 13 after a Creek raid on her Tennesse home.[52]
  • Petronia Justa, a woman in Herculaneum who sued her master claiming to have been born after her mother's emanicipation; the records of the lawsuit were preserved by the eruption of Vesuvius.[59]
  • Phaedo of Elis, captured in war, enslaved in Athens and forced into prostitution,[60] became a pupil of Socrates who had him freed, gave his name to one of Plato's dialogues, Phaedo and became a famous philosopher in his own right.
  • Phaedrus (c. 15 BC – c. AD 50) Roman fabulist
  • Phillis Wheatley (1753-1784?), Colonial American poet
  • Phoebe, a slave who sued for her freedom in Tennesse, along with her sons Davy and Tom, claiming to be the descendents of an enslaved Indian woman whose sister and other relatives had proven that they were wrongly enslaved.[61]
  • Pope Pius I was Pope from about 140 to about 154, during the reign of the Roman Emperor Antonius Pius.
  • Prosper, a slave murdered by his owner Arthur William Hodge, for which Hodge was tried and executed, the first (and virtually only) such case ever recorded.

Q

R

  • Rebecca Huger, a slave freed by General Benjamin F. Butler in New Orleans, and described in a Harper's Weekly article as being to all appearance white, and having come to a school for emacipated slaves in Philadelphia.[20]
  • Robert Drury (born 1687; died between 1743 and 1750) was an English sailor who was shipwrecked on the island of Madagascar in 1702, and remained there as a slave till 1717.
  • Robert Smalls (1839–1915), led boatload of slaves to freedom, and was later a politician
  • Rosina Downs, a slave freed by General Benjamin F. Butler in New Orleans, and described in a Harper's Weekly article as being to all appearance white, and having come to a school for emacipated slaves in Philadelphia.[20]
  • Roustam Raza, Napoleon Bonaparte's Armenian bodyguard.
  • Roxelana, (circa 1500–April 18, 1558), a concubine and later wife to the sultan Suleiman the Magnificent, and mother of Selim II.

S

  • Safiye Sultan, originally enslaved Venetian woman, who was placed in the harem of the Ottoman Sultan Murad III and became the mother of Sultan Mehmed III.
  • Sally Miller or Salomé Müller, an American slave whose freedom suit in Louisiana was based on her claimed status as a free German immigrant and indentured servant.[62]
  • Salvius, also known as Tryphon, leader of the 104 BC slave rebellion in Sicily known as the Second Servile War.
  • Sambo, a black captive of Tiger King, a Lower Creek, who told the travelre William Bartram that Sambo was his family property.[63]
  • Scipio Africanus (circa 1702–1720)
  • Scipio Moorhead, enslaved artist.
  • Servius Tullius, ancient King of Rome said to have started life as a slave (though this was disputed, among both Romans and modern historians).
  • Sojourner Truth (c. 1797–1883) abolitionist and women's rights activist
  • Solomon Bayley, wrote a book in 1825 about his life as a slave.
  • Spartacus, gladiator and rebel leader, led the Servile Revolt, died 71 BC
  • Solomon Northup,(1808-1870??) free-born black man, born in the North of the United States, who was lured into a slave state, consequently kidnapped, sold down south and remained enslaved for 12 years (1841–1853), until rescued and liberated by a white lawyer Henry Northup
  • Sue, a black slave of James Brown, who was captured along with several members of the Brown family and other slaves by Chickamaugas. When the warrior who had captured her threatened another captive, the other captor threatened to kill Sue in retribution.[64] James's son Joseph later kidnapped Sue and her children and grandchildren -- eight in all-- in retribution for his captivity.[65]

T

  • T. Aelius Dionysius, a freedman of the late Roman Empire, who created a stela for himself, his wife, and Aelius Perseus his fellow freedman, and their freedman and those who came after them.[66]
  • T. Claudius Dionysius, a freedman whose freedwoman wife Claudia Prepontis, erected a funerary altar to him; their clasped hands, depicted on it, show the legitimacy of their marriage, possible only once they obtained their freedom.[67]
  • Terence (full name Publius Terentius Afer), Roman playwright, comic poet who wrote before and possibly after his freedom, died 159 BC.
  • Toussaint L'Ouverture, freed slave who led the slave revolt that led to the independence of Haiti.
  • Turgut Reis, a well-known Ottoman Admiral of the 16th Century, was captured by the Genoese at Corsica and was forced to work as a galley slave for nearly four years. He was finally rescued by his fellow admiral Barbarossa, who laid siege to Genoa and secured Turgut Reis' release for the prodigious ransom of 3,500 gold ducats.

U

V

  • Vincent de Paul. (1576–1660) Taken captive by Turkish pirates, sold into slavery, freed in 1607.[68]
  • Vibia Calybeni a freedwoman of the late Roman Empire, who unusually names herself as a madam on her tombstone.[69]
  • Violet Ludlow, an American woman sold as a slave several times despite her claims to be a free white woman.[20]
  • Volumnia Cytheris, a slave, later freedwoman, in ancient Rome. An actress and courtesan, her lovers include Brutus, Mark Antony, and Cornelius Gallus; her rejection of Gallus provided the theme for Virgil's tenth Eclogue. [70]

W

  • William Ellison (1790–1861), mixed race, gained his freedom, became a slaveholder himself, producing cotton.
  • William and Ellen Craft, slaves who wrote a tale of their flight from slavery (19th century).
  • William Henry, nicknamed Jerry, escaped slave in Syracuse, New York, saved in 1851 by abolitionists from being extradited under the Fugitive Slave Law.
  • William Lee, personal servant to George Washington.
  • Wulfstan, a slave in Anglo-Saxon England, and his two sons and stepdaugher, were freed by his mistres Æthelgifu's will.[5]

Y

  • Yaqut al-Hamawi, sold into slavery in the 12th century Syria and taken to Baghdad, was provided with a good education by an enlightened owner and later freed. He eventually gained a reputation as a biographer and geographer.
  • York, an African-American slave on the Lewis and Clark Expedition.

Z

  • Zayd ibn Haritha, given to Muhammad's wife Khadijah, freed, adopted, became known as Zayd ibn Muhammad.
  • Ziryab, also known as Abul-Hasan Alí Ibn Nafí, musician, introduced asparagus to Europe (circa 789–857).
  • Zumbi, escaped and joined the Quilombo dos Palmares, the largest ever settlement of escaped slaves in colonial Brazil, becoming its last and most famous leader.

References

  1. ^ Ariela J. Gross, What Blood Won't Tell: A History of Race on Trail in America, p 31 ISBN 978-0-674-03130-2
  2. ^ Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 141 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  3. ^ Christine Fell, Women in Anglo-Saxon England: and the impact of 1066, p 49, ISBN 0-7141-8057-2
  4. ^ Elaine Fantham, Helene Peet Foley, Natalie Boymel Kampen, Sarah B. Pomeroy, H. A. Shapiro, Women in the Classical World p 370 ISBN 0-19-509862-5
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i Christine Fell, Women in Anglo-Saxon England: and the impact of 1066, p 97, ISBN 0-7141-8057-2
  6. ^ "St. Agathoclia"
  7. ^ Ariela J. Gross, What Blood Won't Tell: A History of Race on Trail in America, p 1 ISBN 978-0-674-03130-2
  8. ^ Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 39 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  9. ^ Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 201-2 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  10. ^ Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 140-1 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  11. ^ Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 128 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  12. ^ "From slavery to being the first black priest"
  13. ^ Elaine Fantham, Helene Peet Foley, Natalie Boymel Kampen, Sarah B. Pomeroy, H. A. Shapiro, Women in the Classical World p 319-20 ISBN 0-19-509862-5
  14. ^ "St. Bathilde", Catholic Encyclopedia
  15. ^ Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 185 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  16. ^ Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 168 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  17. ^ Elaine Fantham, Helene Peet Foley, Natalie Boymel Kampen, Sarah B. Pomeroy, H. A. Shapiro, Women in the Classical World p 268 ISBN 0-19-509862-5
  18. ^ Catholic Encyclopedia, St. Blandina
  19. ^ "Pope Callistus I", Catholic Encyclopedia
  20. ^ a b c d Lawrence R. Tenzer, "White Slaves"
  21. ^ Elaine Fantham, Helene Peet Foley, Natalie Boymel Kampen, Sarah B. Pomeroy, H. A. Shapiro, Women in the Classical World p 320-1 ISBN 0-19-509862-5
  22. ^ Clement of Rome
  23. ^ Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 196 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  24. ^ Elaine Fantham, Helene Peet Foley, Natalie Boymel Kampen, Sarah B. Pomeroy, H. A. Shapiro, Women in the Classical World p 268 ISBN 0-19-509862-5
  25. ^ Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 133 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  26. ^ http://library.uncg.edu/slavery/
  27. ^ [1].
  28. ^ a b Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 197 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  29. ^ a b Christine Fell, Women in Anglo-Saxon England: and the impact of 1066, p 86, ISBN 0-7141-8057-2
  30. ^ Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 130 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  31. ^ Daniel K. Richter, Facing East from Indian Country, p 243, ISBN 0-674-00638-0
  32. ^ Elaine Fantham, Helene Peet Foley, Natalie Boymel Kampen, Sarah B. Pomeroy, H. A. Shapiro, Women in the Classical World p 270 ISBN 0-19-509862-5
  33. ^ "Sts. Felicitas and Perpetua", Catholic Encyclopedia
  34. ^ Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 147-8 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  35. ^ Ariela J. Gross, What Blood Won't Tell: A History of Race on Trail in America, p 23-4 ISBN 978-0-674-03130-2
  36. ^ Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 38-9 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  37. ^ Ariela J. Gross, What Blood Won't Tell: A History of Race on Trail in America, p 24-5 ISBN 978-0-674-03130-2
  38. ^ Soldier of Furtune: John Smith before Jamestown
  39. ^ Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 200 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  40. ^ Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 184-5 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  41. ^ Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 35-6 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  42. ^ Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 201 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  43. ^ Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 67 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  44. ^ Christine Fell, Women in Anglo-Saxon England: and the impact of 1066, p 47, ISBN 0-7141-8057-2
  45. ^ Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 149 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  46. ^ Elaine Fantham, Helene Peet Foley, Natalie Boymel Kampen, Sarah B. Pomeroy, H. A. Shapiro, Women in the Classical World p 319-20 ISBN 0-19-509862-5
  47. ^ Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 182 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  48. ^ Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 174-5 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  49. ^ Sarah B. Pomeroy, Goddesses, Whores, Wives, and Slaves, p198 ISBN 0-8052-1030-x
  50. ^ Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 141 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  51. ^ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
  52. ^ a b Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 133-4 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  53. ^ Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 130 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  54. ^ http://library.uncg.edu/slavery/
  55. ^ Ariela J. Gross, What Blood Won't Tell: A History of Race on Trail in America, p 120 ISBN 978-0-674-03130-2
  56. ^ Elaine Fantham, Helene Peet Foley, Natalie Boymel Kampen, Sarah B. Pomeroy, H. A. Shapiro, Women in the Classical World p 114-5 ISBN 0-19-509862-5
  57. ^ "St. Patrick", Catholic Encyclopedia
  58. ^ Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 189 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  59. ^ Sarah B. Pomeroy, Goddesses, Whores, Wives, and Slaves, p197 ISBN 0-8052-1030-x
  60. ^ Diogenes Laërtius, ii. 105
  61. ^ Ariela J. Gross, What Blood Won't Tell: A History of Race on Trail in America, p 25-6 ISBN 978-0-674-03130-2
  62. ^ Ariela J. Gross, What Blood Won't Tell: A History of Race on Trail in America, p 59 ISBN 978-0-674-03130-2
  63. ^ Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 129 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  64. ^ Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 153 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  65. ^ Christina Synder, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, p 154 ISBN 978-0-674-04890-4
  66. ^ Elaine Fantham, Helene Peet Foley, Natalie Boymel Kampen, Sarah B. Pomeroy, H. A. Shapiro, Women in the Classical World p 369-70 ISBN 0-19-509862-5
  67. ^ Elaine Fantham, Helene Peet Foley, Natalie Boymel Kampen, Sarah B. Pomeroy, H. A. Shapiro, Women in the Classical World p 320-1 ISBN 0-19-509862-5
  68. ^ "St. Vincent de Paul", Catholic Encyclopedia
  69. ^ Elaine Fantham, Helene Peet Foley, Natalie Boymel Kampen, Sarah B. Pomeroy, H. A. Shapiro, Women in the Classical World p 380 ISBN 0-19-509862-5
  70. ^ Sarah B. Pomeroy, Goddesses, Whores, Wives, and Slaves, p198-9 ISBN 0-8052-1030-x

Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • SLAVES — Les peuples slaves, dont le nom n’est mentionné pour la première fois qu’en 500 après J. C., ont constitué au cours du Moyen Âge de puissants États tels la principauté de Grande Moravie, la Russie kiévienne, le royaume de Pologne, le grand duché… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • List of Batman animated episodes — List of Batman episodes redirects here. For episodes of the live action television series, see List of Batman television episodes. For episodes of The Batman, see List of The Batman episodes. Batman: The Animated Series credits logo. The… …   Wikipedia

  • List of United States Presidential names — contains lists of nicknames, name origins, and the first, middle, and last names of each President of the United States. Most of the nicknames listed are political, such as Tricky Dick , which belonged to Richard Nixon, initialisms like T.R.… …   Wikipedia

  • List of organizations in the Honorverse — universe, created by David Weber. Contents 1 Audubon Ballroom 2 Brotherhood of Maccabeus 3 Church of Humanity Unchained 3.1 History …   Wikipedia

  • List of Doctor Who universe creatures and aliens — This is a list of fictional creatures and aliens from the universe of the long running BBC science fiction television series Doctor Who, including Torchwood, The Sarah Jane Adventures and K 9. It covers alien races and other fictional creatures,… …   Wikipedia

  • List of Doctor Who monsters and aliens — This is a list of monsters and aliens from the long running BBC science fiction television series Doctor Who . The list includes some races which are not extraterrestrial, but are nonetheless non human. This list is meant to cover alien races and …   Wikipedia

  • Slaves of Las Vegas — Infobox Television episode Title= Slaves of Las Vegas Series= Season = 2 Episode = 8 Guests= Melinda Clarke (Lady Heather) Kelly Rowan (Eilene Nelson} Airdate = November 15, 2001 Production = Writer = Jerry Stahl Director = Peter Markle Season… …   Wikipedia

  • List of ethnic slurs — The following is a list of ethnic slurs (ethnophaulisms) that are, or have been, used as insinuations or allegations about members of a given ethnicity or to refer to them in a derogatory (critical or disrespectful), pejorative (disapproving or… …   Wikipedia

  • List of Honorverse characters — This is intended to be a comprehensive list of the names of even minor fictional character in the Honorverse, a series of military science fiction novels written by David Weber. Characters are sorted by their last name. Some are sorted by first… …   Wikipedia

  • List of Deltora Quest characters — The Deltora series features a wide line of characters, both important and minor. The series also features many different monsters and creatures that appeared in all of the many different books. This article is a list of the many different… …   Wikipedia