Demographics of New Brunswick


Demographics of New Brunswick

New Brunswick is one of Canada's three Maritime provinces, and the only officially bilingual province (French and English) in the country. The provincial Department of Finance estimates that the province's population in 2006 was 729,997 of which the majority is English-speaking but with a substantial (32%) French-speaking minority of mostly Acadian origin.

First Nations in New Brunswick include the Mi'kmaq and Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet). The first European settlers, the Acadians, are today survivors of the Great Expulsion (1755) which drove several thousand French residents into exile in North America, the UK and France for refusing to take an oath of allegiance to King George III during the French and Indian War. American Acadians, who wound up in Louisiana and other parts of the American South, are often referred to as Cajuns.

Many of the English-Canadian population of New Brunswick are descended from Loyalists who fled the American Revolution. This is commemorated in the province's motto, Spem reduxit ("hope was restored"). There is also a significant population with Irish ancestry, especially in Saint John and the Miramichi Valley. People of Scottish descent are scattered throughout the Province with higher concentrations in the Miramichi and in Campbellton. A small population of Danish origin may be found in New Denmark in the northwest of the province.

Contents

Population

City Metropolitan Areas

City 2006 2001
Moncton 126,424 118,678
Saint John 122,389 122,678
Fredericton 85,688 81,346
Bathurst 31,424 32,523
Miramichi 24,737 25,274
Campbellton 17,888 18,820
Edmundston 21,442 22,173

Population of New Brunswick since 1851

Year Population Five Year
 % change
Ten Year
 % change
Rank Among
Provinces
1851 193,800 n/a n/a 4
1861 252,047 n/a 30.0 4
1871 285,594 n/a 13.3 4
1881 321,233 n/a 12.5 4
1891 321,263 n/a 0.0 4
1901 331,120 n/a 3.1 4
1911 351,889 n/a 6.3 8
1921 387,876 n/a 10.2 8
1931 408,219 n/a 5.2 8
1941 457,401 n/a 12.0 8
1951 515,697 n/a 12.7 8
1956 554,616 7.5 n/a 8
1961 597,936 7.8 15.9 8
1966 616,788 3.2 11.2 8
1971 634,560 2.9 6.9 8
1976 677,250 6.7 9.8 8
1981 696,403 2.8 9.7 8
1986 709,445 1.9 4.8 8
1991 723,900 2.0 3.9 8
1996 738,133 2.0 4.0 8
2001 729,498 -1.2 0.8 8
2006* 749,168 2.7 1.5 8

*Preliminary 2006 census estimate.

Source: Statistics Canada [1][2]

Ethnic origin

Ethnic Origin Population Percent
Canadian / Canadien 415,810 57.78%
French 193,470 26.8%
English 165,235 22.96%
Irish 135,835 18.87%
Scottish 127,635 17.73%
German 27,490 3.82%
Acadian 26,220 3.64%
North American Indian 23,815 3.31%
Dutch (Netherlands) 13,355 1.86%
Welsh 7,620 1.06%
Italian 5,610 0.78%
Métis 4,955 0.69%
American (USA) 3,925 0.55%
Danish 3,390 0.47%


The information at the left is from Statistics Canada [3] Percentages add to more than 100% because of dual responses e.g. "Danish-Canadian" generates an entry in both the category "Danish" and the category "Canadian". Groups with more than 3,000 responses are included.

Languages

The 2006 Canadian census showed a population of 729,997. Of the 714,490 singular responses to the question concerning mother tongue the most commonly reported languages were:

1. English 463,190 64.83%
2. French 232,975 32.61%
3. Algonquian languages 3,050 0.43%
Mi'kmaq 2,515 0.35%
Malecite 490 0.07%
4. Chinese languages 2,160 0.30%
Mandarin 505 0.07%
Cantonese 295 0.04%
Taiwanese 90 0.01%
5. German 1,935 0.27%
6. Dutch (Nederlands) 1,290 0.18%
7. Spanish 1,040 0.15%
8. Arabic 970 0.14%
9. Korean 630 0.09%
10. Italian 590 0.08%
11= Scandinavian languages 500 0.07%
Danish 385 0.05%
Norwegian 70 0.01%
11= Serbo-Croatian languages 500 0.07%
Croatian 160 0.02%
Bosnian 115 0.02%
Serbian 95 0.01%
13. Persian 460 0.06%
14. Bantu languages 375 0.05%
Swahili 140 0.02%
15. Tagalog (Pilipino/Filipino) 330 0.05%
16. Russian 315 0.04%
17. Urdu 295 0.04%
18. Greek 275 0.04%
19. Russian 235 0.03%
20. Hungarian (Magyar) 230 0.03%
21. Polish 220 0.03%
22. Portuguese 210 0.03%
23. Vietnamese 205 0.03%
24. Creole 180 0.03%
25. Niger–Congo languages n.i.e. 165 0.02%

Note: "n.i.e.": not included elsewhere

There were also 160 single-language responses for Gujarati; 140 for Romanian; 125 for Non-verbal languages (Sign languages); 115 for Japanese; 110 for Bengali; 105 for Indo-Iranian languages n.i.e.; 85 for Somali; 80 for Gaelic languages; 80 for Sinhala (Sinhalese); and 75 for Malayalam. In addition, there were also 560 responses of English and a non-official language; 120 of French and a non-official language; 4,450 of English and French; and 30 of English, French, and a non-official language. New Brunswick's official languages are shown in bold. (Figures shown are for the number of single language responses and the percentage of total single-language responses.)[4]

Migration

Immigration

The 2006 Canadian census counted a total of 28,395 immigrants living in New Brunswick.
The most commonly reported origins for these immigrants were: [5]

1. United States 8,660
2. United Kingdom 5,205
3. Germany 1,770
4. Netherlands 995
5. China 925
6. India 600
7. Italy 405
8. South Korea 370
9. former Yugoslavia 355
10. Philippines 350
11. France 320
12. Iran 265
13. Lebanon 220
14. Pakistan 205

There were also 195 immigrants from the Democratic Republic of Congo; 180 from Vietnam; 170 from Colombia; 165 each from Hungary and Romania; 155 each from Belgium and El Salvador; 140 each from Greece and Ireland (Éire); 125 from Poland; 120 each from Afghanistan and South Africa; 115 from Ukraine; 110 from Guyana; 105 each from Denmark and from Trinidad and Tobago; and 100 from Austria.

Internal migration

A total of 64,205 people moved to New Brunswick from other parts of Canada between 1996 and 2006 while 83,240 people moved in the opposite direction. These movements resulted in a net outmigration of 8,410 people to Alberta, 4,330 to Ontario, 2,930 to Nova Scotia, and 1,995 to Quebec. During this period there was a net outmigration of 2,125 francophones to Quebec, 1,460 francophones going to Ontario, 1,355 to Alberta and 145 to Nova Scotia; and also a net influx of 240 anglophones from Quebec. (All net inter-provincial movements of more than 500 persons and official minority movements of more than 100 persons are given.)[6][7]

Religion

The Catholic Church (53.4%) is the largest denomination. The three largest Protestant denominations (35.7%) in New Brunswick are the United Church of Canada and the Baptist and Anglican churches. Other Christians (1.4%), other religions (0.8%) and no religious affiliation (8.7%) make of the remainder of the population.

See also

NB
Canadian Provinces and Territories
Demographics of Canada's provinces and territories

References


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