Prenylamine


Prenylamine
Prenylamine
Systematic (IUPAC) name
N-(1-methyl-2-phenylethyl)-3,3-diphenylpropan-1-amine
Clinical data
Pregnancy cat.  ?
Legal status Uncontrolled
Routes Oral
Identifiers
ATC code C01DX02
PubChem CID 9801
UNII K2OH82Z000 N
ChEMBL CHEMBL24072 N
Synonyms N-(3,3-diphenylpropyl)amphetamine
Chemical data
Formula C24H27N 
Mol. mass 329.48 g/mol
 N(what is this?)  (verify)

Prenylamine (Segontin) is a calcium channel blocker of the amphetamine chemical class which is used as a vasodilator in the treatment of angina pectoris. It has been shown to partially metabolize to amphetamine and can cause false positives for it in drug tests.[1][2][3] Prenylamine also appears to act as a vesicular monoamine transporter inhibitor, and has been demonstrated to deplete vesicular monoamine neurotransmitter stores similarly to reserpine.[4]

References

  1. ^ Kraemer T, Roditis SK, Peters FT, Maurer HH (March 2003). "Amphetamine concentrations in human urine following single-dose administration of the calcium antagonist prenylamine-studies using fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) and GC-MS". Journal of Analytical Toxicology 27 (2): 68–73. PMID 12669999. http://openurl.ingenta.com/content/nlm?genre=article&issn=0146-4760&volume=27&issue=2&spage=68&aulast=Kraemer. 
  2. ^ Musshoff F (February 2000). "Illegal or legitimate use? Precursor compounds to amphetamine and methamphetamine". Drug Metabolism Reviews 32 (1): 15–44. doi:10.1081/DMR-100100562. PMID 10711406. http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.1081/DMR-100100562. 
  3. ^ Cody JT (May 2002). "Precursor medications as a source of methamphetamine and/or amphetamine positive drug testing results". Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine / American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine 44 (5): 435–50. PMID 12024689. http://meta.wkhealth.com/pt/pt-core/template-journal/lwwgateway/media/landingpage.htm?issn=1076-2752&volume=44&issue=5&spage=435. 
  4. ^ Bagchi SP (1990). "Antidopaminergic action of verapamil and several other drugs: inactivation of vesicular dopamine". Life Sciences 46 (12): 857–63. doi:10.1016/0024-3205(90)90115-8. PMID 1969603.