Philip Warren Anderson


Philip Warren Anderson
Philip Warren Anderson

Born 13 December 1923 (1923-12-13) (age 87)
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Nationality United States
Fields Physics
Institutions Bell Laboratories
Princeton University
Cambridge University
Alma mater Harvard University
U.S. Naval Research Laboratory
Doctoral advisor John Hasbrouck van Vleck
Notable awards Nobel Prize in Physics (1977)

Philip Warren Anderson (born December 13, 1923) is an American physicist and Nobel laureate. Anderson has made contributions to the theories of localization, antiferromagnetism and high-temperature superconductivity.[1]

Contents

Biography

Anderson was born in Indianapolis, Indiana and grew up in Urbana, Illinois. He graduated from University Laboratory High School in Urbana in 1940. Afterwards, he went to Harvard University for undergraduate and graduate work, with a wartime stint at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory in-between. In graduate school he studied under John Hasbrouck van Vleck.

From 1949 to 1984 he worked at Bell Laboratories in New Jersey, where he worked on a wide variety of problems in condensed matter physics. During this period he discovered the concept of localization, the idea that extended states can be localized by the presence of disorder in a system; the Anderson Hamiltonian, which describes electrons in a transition metal; he also claimed to have discovered the "Higgs" mechanism for generating mass in elementary particles; and the pseudospin approach to the BCS theory of superconductivity. He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1963.[2]

From 1967 to 1975, Anderson was a professor of theoretical physics at Cambridge University. In 1977 Anderson was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his investigations into the electronic structure of magnetic and disordered systems, which allowed for the development of electronic switching and memory devices in computers. Co-researchers Sir Nevill Francis Mott and John van Vleck shared the award with him. In 1982, he was awarded the National Medal of Science. He retired from Bell Labs in 1984 and is currently Joseph Henry Professor of Physics at Princeton University.

Anderson's writings include Concepts of Solids, Basic Notions of Condensed Matter Physics and The Theory of Superconductivity in the High-Tc Cuprates. Anderson currently serves on the board of advisors of Scientists and Engineers for America, an organization focused on promoting sound science in American government. He is a certified first degree-master of the Chinese board game Go.

A 2006 statistical analysis of scientific research papers by José Soler, comparing number of references in a paper to the number of citations, declared Anderson to be the "most creative" physicist in the world.[3]

Publications

References

  1. ^ Horgan, J. (1994) Profile: Philip W. Anderson – Gruff Guru of Condensed Matter Physics, Scientific American 271(5), 34-35.
  2. ^ "Book of Members, 1780-2010: Chapter A". American Academy of Arts and Sciences. http://www.amacad.org/publications/BookofMembers/ChapterA.pdf. Retrieved 18 April 2011. 
  3. ^ World's most creative physicist revealed - physicsworld.com
  • Anderson, P.W. (1997). THE Theory of Superconductivity in High-Tc Cuprates. Princeton: Princeton University Press. ISBN 0691043655. 
  • Anderson, P.W. (1997). Basic Notions of Condensed Matter Physics. Reading: Addison-Wesley. ISBN 0201328305. 
  • Anderson, P.W. (1998). Concepts in Solids: Lectures on the Theory of Solids. Singapore: World Scientific. ISBN 9810232314. 
  • Bernstein, Jeremy (1987). Three degrees above zero: Bell Laboratories in the information age. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0521329833. 

External links


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  • Philip Warren Anderson — Philip W. Anderson Philip Warren Anderson (* 13. Dezember 1923 in Indianapolis, Indiana) ist ein amerikanischer Theoretischer Physiker und hat 1977 zusammen mit Nevill F. Mott und John H. van Vleck den Nobelpreis für Physik „für die grundlegen …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Philip Warren Anderson — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Fotografía de Anderson. Philip Warren Anderson (Indianápolis, 13 de diciembre de 1923). Doctor en Física por la Universidad Harvard en 1949, es uno de los físicos más prolíficos y de ampl …   Wikipedia Español

  • Philip Warren Anderson — Philip Warren Anderson, (Indianapolis, 13 de diciembre de 1923, Doctor en Física por la Universidad de Harvard en 1949, es uno de los físicos más prolíficos y de amplio abanico de lo últimos tiempos. Después de completar sus estudios trabajó en… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Philip Warren Anderson — Pour les articles homonymes, voir Anderson. Philip Warren Anderson Philip Warren Anderson (13 décembre 1923) est un physicien …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Philip Warren Anderson — noun United States physicist who studied the electronic structure of magnetic and disordered systems (1923 ) • Syn: ↑Anderson, ↑Philip Anderson, ↑Phil Anderson • Instance Hypernyms: ↑physicist …   Useful english dictionary

  • Philip W. Anderson — Philip Warren Anderson (* 13. Dezember 1923 in Indianapolis, Indiana) ist ein amerikanischer Theoretischer Physiker und hat 1977 zusammen mit Nevill F. Mott und John H. van Vleck den Nobelpreis für Physik „für die grundlegenden theoretischen L …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Philip W. Anderson — Philip Warren Anderson Pour les articles homonymes, voir Anderson. Philip Warren Anderson Philip Warren Anderson est un physicien américain né le …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Warren Anderson — may refer to:* Warren Anderson (chairman), former chairman of Union Carbide * Warren M. Anderson, former New York politician * Philip Warren Anderson, physicist * Bubba Sparxxx, real name Warren Anderson Mathis * Warren Anderson (businessman),… …   Wikipedia

  • Anderson,Philip Warren — Anderson, Philip Warren. Born 1923. American physicist. He shared a 1977 Nobel Prize for developments in computer memory systems. * * * …   Universalium

  • Anderson , Philip Warren — (1923– American physicist Anderson was born in Indianapolis and obtained his BS (1943), MS (1947), and PhD (1949) at Harvard University, doing his doctoral thesis under John Van Vleck. The period 1943–45 was spent at the Naval Research Laboratory …   Scientists


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