Telecommunications in Germany


Telecommunications in Germany

Germany's telecommunication system is highly developed. Germany telecommunication market is fully liberalized since January 1, 1998. Germany is served by an extensive system of automatic telephone exchanges connected by modern networks of fiber-optic cable, coaxial cable, microwave radio relay, and a domestic satellite system; cellular telephone service is widely available, expanding rapidly, and includes roaming service to foreign countries. As a result of intensive capital expenditures since reunification, the formerly backward system of the eastern part of the country was being rapidly updated to the most advanced technology. Deutsche Telekom began rolling out FTTH networks in 10 cities in 2011, following the launch of pilot projects in Hennigsdorf, Braunschweig and Dresden in 2010.[1]

Contents

Telephone

Radio

Broadcasting in the Federal Republic of Germany is reserved under the Basic Law (constitution) to the states. This means that all public broadcasting is regionalised. National broadcasts must be aired through the national consortium of public broadcasters (ARD) or authorized by a treaty negotiated between the states.

Internet

DSL infrastructure is highly developed. cable internet based on DOCSIS technology was not available till mid 2000s, because the cable TV infrastructure was owned by Deutsche Telekom, which promoted DSL and neglected the cable network. It was sold after political pressure a few years ago, and is now owned by Kabel Deutschland.

References

  1. ^ Deutsche Telekom fibre plans?, Aug 26 2011, Advanced Television

Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

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