University of Dallas


University of Dallas
University of Dallas

Seal of the University of Dallas
Latin: Universitas Dallasensis
Motto Veritatem, Justitiam Diligite[1]
Motto in English Love Ye Truth and Justice[1]
Established 1956[2]
Type Private, Coeducational[3]
Religious affiliation Catholic Church[3]
Endowment US$43.8 million (2010) ↓ $48 million (2008)[4]
Chairman Mr. Francis P. Hubach, Jr., J.D.[5]
Chancellor Most Rev. Kevin J. Farrell, D.D.[5]
President Mr. Thomas W. Keefe, J.D.[6]
Provost Dr. J. William Berry, Ph.D.[6]
Academic staff 135 full-time, 104 part-time[7]
Students 2,843[8]
Undergraduates 1,337[8]
Postgraduates 1,506[8]
Location Irving, TX, USA[3]
32°50′42″N 96°55′33″W / 32.8451074°N 96.925807°W / 32.8451074; -96.925807Coordinates: 32°50′42″N 96°55′33″W / 32.8451074°N 96.925807°W / 32.8451074; -96.925807[9]
Campus Midsize City;[3] 744 acres (301 hectares)[10]
Annual Alumni Giving 11%[11]
Colors Navy and White         [12]
Athletics NCAA Division III (without football)[13]
Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference[14]

Texas Rugby Union, Men's Collegiate Division II[15]
Sports 14 NCAA teams;[12]1 Texas Rugby Union team[15]
Nickname Crusaders[12]
Affiliations Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities[16]
Council of Independent Colleges[17]
National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities[18]
Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference[14]
Website www.udallas.edu

The University of Dallas is a private, independent Catholic regional university located in Irving, Texas, established in 1956, which is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.[19] According to U.S. News & World Report, 80% of 2010 graduates participated in international programs, which is the sixth highest percentage of students from any higher education institution in the US to study abroad.[20]

The university comprises four academic units: the Braniff Graduate School of Liberal Arts, the Constantin College of Liberal Arts, the College of Business, which includes the Graduate School of Management, and the School of Ministry.[21] The undergraduate program was ranked 14th among 140 regional universities in the Western US by U.S. News & World Report for 2011-2012.[22] Dallas offers several master's degree programs and a doctoral degree program with three concentrations.[23] There are 135 full-time and 104 part-time faculty, and the school has a 12:1 student-to-faculty ratio.[3]

Contents

History

The University of Dallas' charter dates from 1910 when the Western Province of the Congregation of the Mission (Vincentians) renamed Holy Trinity College in Dallas, which they had founded in 1905.[24] The provincial of the Western Province closed the University in 1928, and the charter reverted to the Diocese of Dallas. In 1955, the Western Province of the Sisters of Saint Mary of Namur obtained it to create a new higher education institution in Dallas that would subsume their junior college, Our Lady of Victory College, located in Fort Worth.[25] The Sisters, together with Eugene Constantin, Jr. and Edward R. Maher, Sr., petitioned the Diocese of Dallas to sponsor the University, though ownership was entrusted to a self-perpetuating independent board of trustees.[26] "Bishop Gorman, as chancellor of the new university, announced that it would be a Catholic coeducational institution welcoming students of all faiths and races and offering work on the undergraduate level, with a graduate school to be added as soon as possible. The new University of Dallas opened to ninety-six students in September 1956 on a 1,000-acre tract of rolling hills northwest of Dallas."[26]

Carpenter Hall, the first building on the campus of the University of Dallas

The Sisters of Saint Mary of Namur, monks from the Order of Cistercians (Cistercians), friars from the Order of Friars Minor (Franciscans), and several lay professors formed the University's original faculty.[26] The Franciscans departed three years later; however, friars from the Order of Preachers (Dominicans) joined the faculty in 1958 and built St. Albert the Great Priory on campus. The Cistercians established Our Lady of Dallas Abbey in 1958[27] and Cistercian Preparatory School in 1962,[28] which are both adjacent to campus. The School Sisters of Notre Dame arrived in 1962 and opened the Notre Dame Special School for children with learning difficulties in 1963[29] and a motherhouse for the Dallas Province in 1964,[30] which were both on campus. The Sisters moved the school to Dallas in 1985 and closed the motherhouse in 1987. The faculty now is almost exclusively lay and includes several distinguished scholars.

A grant from the Blakley-Braniff Foundation established the Braniff Graduate School in 1966 and allowed the construction of the Braniff Graduate Center. The Constantin Foundation similarly endowed the undergraduate college, and, in 1970, the Board of Trustees named the undergraduate college the Constantin College of Liberal Arts. The Graduate School of Management, begun in 1966, offers a large MBA program. Programs in art and English also began in 1966. In 1973, the Institute of Philosophic Studies, the doctoral program of the Braniff Graduate School and an outgrowth of the Kendall Politics and Literature Program, was initiated. The School of Ministry began in 1987. The College of Business, incorporating the Graduate School of Management and undergraduate business, opened in 2003.

Since the first class in 1960, University graduates have won significant honors, including 30 Fulbright awards.[31] Accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools came in 1963 and has been reaffirmed regularly.[19] In 1989, it was the youngest higher education institution to be awarded a Phi Beta Kappa chapter.[32]

Governance and leadership

The University of Dallas is governed by a board of trustees, which currently is chaired by Francis P. Hubach, Jr., J.D.[5] According to the University's by-laws, the bishop of Dallas is an ex-officio voting member.

Kevin J. Farrell, D.D., bishop of the Diocese of Dallas, currently serves as the Chancellor.[5] The office, held by a Catholic bishop per the constitution of the University, is an unpaid, honorary position.

Previous chancellors include:

  1. Most Rev. Thomas Kiely Gorman, Hist.Eccl.D. (1954–1969)
  2. Most Rev. Thomas Ambrose Tschoepe, D.D. (1969–1990)
  3. Most Rev. Charles Victor Grahmann, D.D. (1990–2007)

Thomas W. Keefe became President of the University of Dallas on March 1, 2010.[6][33] Since taking office, the University's endowment has gone down by approximately $4 million,[4] while the percentage of annual alumni giving is 11%.[11]

Previous presidents include:

  1. Dr. F. Kenneth Brasted (1956–1959)
  2. Dr. Robert J. Morris (1960–1962)
  3. Dr. Donald A. Cowan (1962–1977)
  4. Dr. John R. Sommerfeldt (1978–1980)
  5. Dr. Robert F. Sasseen (1981–1995)
  6. Msgr. Milam J. Joseph (1996–2003)
  7. Dr. Frank Lazarus (2003–2009)

Campus

The UD mall, with the Braniff Tower in the background

The University is located in Irving, TX on a 744 acre (301 hectare) campus[10] surrounded by highways and an industrial and low-income multi-unit housing area, 10 miles (16 km) from downtown Dallas and just southeast of the Las Colinas development; "it sits in a 50-mile by 10-mile rectangular phenomenon known as a slow-moving earthquake."[34] The campus consists mostly of nondescript, brown-colored rectangular or otherwise box-shaped brick buildings. The Mall is the center of campus, with the 187.5 feet-tall (57.15 meters) Braniff Memorial Tower as its focal point. Although the University is Catholic, its campus-exterior lacks almost any sacred art. The Princeton Review cites the University of Dallas for having the 4th least beautiful campus of the colleges and universities it ranks.[35]

A Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) Orange-Line light rail station is scheduled to open near campus on July 30, 2012.[36]

Enrollment

Undergraduate[8]

  • 1,337 students
  • 43% in-state; 54% out-of-state
  • 99% full-time
  • 51% female; 49% male
  • 23% non-white
  • 97% age 24 and under
  • 82% Catholic[37]

The 2011-2012 estimated charges, including tuition, room, board, and fees, for full-time undergraduates is $40,941.[38]

82% of freshmen who began their degree programs in Fall 2009 returned as sophomores in Fall 2010. 63% of freshmen who began their degree programs in Fall 2004 graduated within 4-years.[39]

Graduate[8]

  • 1,506 students
  • 26% full-time
  • 34% Catholic[37]

Academics

Departments

Humanities and Sciences

Humanities

Natural Sciences

Social Sciences

Professions

Artistic and Humanistic Professions

Applied Scientific and Technological Professions
(none)

Social Professions

Undergraduate

Undergraduate students are enrolled in the Constantin College of Liberal Arts, the College of Business, or the School of Ministry. The university awards bachelor of arts (B.A.) and bachelor of science (B.S.) degrees.

Rome Program

The University started its Rome Program in 1970.[40] The Program is a semester abroad in which (generally) sophomores spend a semester in Rome. The University has had its campus at a number of locations over the years. It was first at a Notre Dame convent[citation needed] in 1970-1971. By 1972, the campus was in the "International Center", a sprawling complex on the Via della Pisana outside the Grande Raccordo Anulare (G.R.A.). In the spring of 1973 in mid-semester, the school moved its campus to "Hotel La Villa", a hotel that catered to tour groups, which had a separate set of buildings that the University used. The school's campus is now a convent.

In 1990, the University purchased a villa southeast of Rome in the Alban Hills. This campus was purchased to serve as the base of the University of Dallas Rome Program. In June 1994, the newly renovated 12-acre (49,000 m2) property was inaugurated as the Eugene Constantin Rome Campus, and that fall it hosted its first students. Just south of Rome along the Via Appia, the campus includes a library, chapel, housing, a dining hall, classrooms, tennis courts, a swimming pool, an outdoor Greco-Roman theater, working vineyards and olive groves.

Graduate

Braniff Graduate School of Liberal Arts

The foyer of the Braniff Graduate Center

A 1966 grant from the Blakley-Braniff Foundation established the Braniff Graduate School of Liberal Arts. It administers master's degrees in many disciplines, including: American Studies, Art, English, Humanities, Philosophy, Politics, Psychology, and Theology.

In 1973, the University initiated the Institute of Philosophic Studies, which was an outgrowth of the Kendall Politics and Literature Program, to administer the Braniff Graduate School of Liberal Arts' doctoral program. The interdisciplinary Ph.D. program offers concentrations in English, Philosophy, and Politics and is the only one in the United States with a core curriculum in great books.

School of Ministry

The University of Dallas School of Ministry offers masters degrees in Theological Studies (MTS), Religious Education (MRE), Catholic School Leadership (MCSL), Catholic School Teaching (MCST), and Pastoral Ministry (MPM). Classes are offered onsite during weeknights and online. The University of Dallas School of Ministry also is one of the few Catholic universities in the US that offer a comprehensive, four-year Catholic Biblical School (CBS) certification program. This program, which covers every book of the bible, is offered onsite and online in both English and Spanish. The CBS is the largest program of its kind among all Catholic universities in the U.S. based on 2007 enrollment numbers.

Lectureships

The Aquinas Lectureship: The Aquinas lecture series, begun in 1983, is an annual event sponsored by the Department of Philosophy in which notable philosophers address contemporary topics in the spirit of Thomas Aquinas.

The John Paul II Theology Lectureship: In 2007, the Theology department announced that a donor had endowed a new lectureship to be named in honor of the late Pope John Paul II.

The Landregan Lectureship:[41] In 1999, the Institute for Religious and Pastoral Studies, which grew into becoming the School of Ministry, established an annual lecture in honor of Steven T. Landregan for his distinguished service to the Catholic Church in North Texas.

The Eugene McDermott Lectureship: In 1974, the university established the Eugene McDermott Lectureship, an endowed lecture series created in honor of Eugene McDermott, the late scientist, businessman, civic leader, and philanthropist.

Rankings

University rankings (overall)
National
Forbes[42] 103
Regional
U.S. News & World Report[43] 14
Master's University class
Washington Monthly[44] 33

Undergraduate

Graduate

  • A survey of political theory professors published in the journal Political Science & Politics ranked the doctoral concentration in politics 28th out of 106-surveyed programs in the US specializing in political theory.[50]
  • The Department of Art was ranked #164 by the U.S. News & World Report's Best Graduate School Rankings.[22]
  • The Graduate School of Management was unlisted in rankings of business schools in U.S. News & World Report,[51] BusinessWeek,[52] Forbes,[53] The Economist,[54] and the Financial Times.[55]
  • The doctoral concentration in philosophy was unlisted in The Philosophical Gourmet Report rankings.[56]
  • U.S. News & World Report did not publish the ranks for the doctoral concentrations in English and politics because they were below the cutoff.[22][57]
  • The 2010 National Research Council Assessment of Research-Doctorate Programs in the US[58] ranked the University of Dallas' doctoral concentrations at or near the bottom (survey-based quality score) of those surveyed in the US: English: 116-119/119;[59] philosophy: 82-90/90;[60] politics: 105/105.[61]

Student life

Athletics

Interscholastic (NCAA Division III - Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference)[12]

Men's sports

Women's sports

Club[15]

  • Men's Rugby (Texas Rugby Union, Collegiate Division II)

Media

The University of Dallas' student newspaper is The University News and its yearbook is The Tower.

Residence life

55% of undergraduate students live on campus.[62] On campus residency is required of all students who have not yet attained senior status or who are under 21 and are not married, not a veteran of the military or who do not live with their parents or relatives in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. These requirements change from year to year depending upon the size of the incoming freshman class; for instance, in 2009, all students with senior credit standing were required to live off campus. Freshmen live in traditional single-sex halls, while upperclassmen live in co-ed accommodation.

Notable People

Alumni

Faculty

Controversial decisions

IRPS faculty departures

In 2001, the entire full-time staff of the Institute for Religious and Pastoral Studies (IRPS) program, including the director Douglas Bushman and associate directors Timothy Herrman and David Twellman, resigned and moved to Ave Maria College[68] Chancellor Charles V. Grahmann called the departure a "blessing." He said, "we are changing the direction of the program." According to Grahmann, the Institute's then administrators had become, "advocates of an ideal orthodoxy and built walls that no one could penetrate."[69] Under the direction of Director Bushman, the IRPS had enjoyed the support of several bishops, including Bishop Edward Slattery in Tulsa, Cardinal Francis George in Chicago, and Cardinal Raymond Burke, then Bishop of La Crosse and currently Prefect of the Supreme Tribunal of the Apostolic Signatura.[70] Since the departures in 2001, the IRPS, under the leadership and direction of Dean Brian Schmisek, was refounded as the School of Ministry, hired scholars to replace those who resigned, and has become larger and, to some, more successful than it was in 2001.[71]

Guadalupe art print scandal

On February 14, 2008 an image of Our Lady of Guadalupe was removed from the Upper Gallery of the Haggerty Art Village. The image, entitled "Saint or Sinner", was on loan from Murray State University in Kentucky and reportedly portrayed the Virgin Mary as a stripper. Responding to the incident, President Frank Lazarus released the following statement:

"By committing an intrinsically evil act before the administration has had a reasonable chance to formulate a response, this theft severely damages the prospects of dealing with this issue in a measured and rational manner as befits the dignity of a university community. Nevertheless, I will respond in a timely fashion to the substantive issues surrounding the display of this work of art in view of our Catholic character, our religious values, and the urgent question of the proper meaning of academic freedom."

Reaction to Dr. Lazarus' statement prompted heated campus discussion. Opinions ranged from support of academic freedom to open hostility towards the university's administration and calls for the president to resign. Some Catholic students questioned whether the theft was actually an "intrinsically evil act", arguing that it was within the prerogative of a Catholic student to remove an image that desecrates the Mother of God.[72]

Cancellation of the School of Pharmacy

In 2007, the University of Dallas Board of Trustees voted for the addition of a School of Pharmacy. The school was scheduled to open in the Fall of 2009. As with the establishment of the Business School, student and faculty reaction to the new School of Pharmacy ranged from support to grave concern over maintaining the University's identity as a liberal arts institution.In 2008 the University suspended the establishment of the Pharmacy School. Administrators cited the financial downturn initiated by the Global financial crisis of 2008–2009 as the central reason for abandoning the proposed program.

School of Ministry undergraduate major in Pastoral Ministry

On March 4, 2011, the University's Board of Trustees unanimously approved a new undergraduate major in pastoral ministry proposed by the School of Ministry. The decision came on the heels of a heated controversy surrounding the proposal.[73] A few School of Ministry faculty were accused of opposing official Catholic teaching on issues such as relativism, homosexuality, and the ordination of women to the priesthood.[74][75] Patrick F. Fagan, father of five UD alumni, authored a commentary titled "Trouble at the University of Dallas?" where he expressed concerns regarding such faculty. President Thomas Keefe defended his administration's decision to push forward with the program at the express request of the Bishops of Dallas and Fort Worth, who stated that there is a desperate need for a pastoral ministry program in North Texas and the approved program, as it has been proposed to them, meets that need.[76][77]

The issues of orthodoxy raised in Fagan's article, and the subsequent unanimous Board approval, met with outrage and resistance among certain students, families, and alumni of the University.[78] Using social networking sites and email, students promulgated the article to their families and friends, including several public figures who actively support UD. Organizations such as EWTN, The Catholic Tide, RealClearPolitics, The Ruth Institute, CatholicCulture.org, the Cardinal Newman Society, and the Knights of Columbus Texas State Council posted the story to their websites. Several Catholic news agencies ran investigative reports on the story, including the Catholic News Agency and the National Catholic Register.[79][80] The situation also attracted the attention of ABC affiliate WFAA Channel 8 News who interviewed President Keefe about the situation and asked him to clarify his "I would have punched them out" comment, made in reference to those who sent him angry emails about the School of Ministry faculty.[81] On March 22, 2011, The University News ran several pieces covering the situation that included remarks from both Dean Brian Schmisek and Patrick Fagan. Schmisek comments that "the idea that we are somehow heretical is so outrageous that it's really laughable." In the same article, Fagan issued his own response, stating that "the Chancellor who is also the local ordinary, his fellow bishop on the board, and the president have all put their reputations on the line that the school will be thoroughly Catholic...I trust them, and they have the grace of state."[82]

In response to the crisis, President Keefe has stated that "everything in the blog is being investigated" and that the issues will be dealt with.[83]

References

  1. ^ a b (PDF) University of Dallas: 2011-2012 Bulletin, Irving, TX: University of Dallas, 2011, p. 3, http://resource.udallas.edu/132/Bulletin2011-2012FINAL.pdf#page=4, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  2. ^ (PDF) University of Dallas: 2011-2012 Bulletin, Irving, TX: University of Dallas, 2011, p. 7, http://resource.udallas.edu/132/Bulletin2011-2012FINAL.pdf#page=8, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  3. ^ a b c d e National Center for Education Statistics (2011), "University of Dallas", College Navigator (U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences), http://nces.ed.gov/collegenavigator/?q=university+of+Dallas&id=224323#general, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  4. ^ a b "University of Dallas", U.S. News & World Report, 2011, http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/university-of-dallas-3651, retrieved 23 September 2011 
  5. ^ a b c d (PDF) University of Dallas: 2011-2012 Bulletin, Irving, TX: University of Dallas, 2011, p. 12, http://resource.udallas.edu/132/Bulletin2011-2012FINAL.pdf#page=13, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  6. ^ a b c (PDF) University of Dallas: 2011-2012 Bulletin, Irving, TX: University of Dallas, 2011, p. 13, http://resource.udallas.edu/132/Bulletin2011-2012FINAL.pdf#page=14, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  7. ^ National Center for Education Statistics (2011), "University of Dallas", College Navigator (U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences), http://nces.ed.gov/collegenavigator/?q=university+of+dallas&=s&id=224323#general, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  8. ^ a b c d e National Center for Education Statistics (2011), "University of Dallas", College Navigator (U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences), http://nces.ed.gov/collegenavigator/?q=university+of+Dallas&id=224323#enrolmt, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  9. ^ "Latitude and Longitude of a Point", iTouchMap.com, 2011, http://itouchmap.com/latlong.html, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  10. ^ a b (PDF) City of Irving Comprehensive Plan Update, 2005 Report, Irving, TX: City of Irving, 2005, p. 27, http://www.ci.irving.tx.us/planning-and-inspections/pdfs/comprehensive-plan-updated-report.pdf#page=33, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  11. ^ a b "Why Give to UD?", University of Dallas, 2011, http://www.udallas.edu/aboutus/offices/advancement/giving/whygive, retrieved 25 September 2011 
  12. ^ a b c d "University of Dallas", Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference, 2011, http://www.scacsports.com/members/dallas/info, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  13. ^ National Center for Education Statistics (2011), "University of Dallas", College Navigator (U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences), http://nces.ed.gov/collegenavigator/?q=university+of+Dallas&id=224323#sports, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  14. ^ a b "Member Institutions", Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference, 2011, http://www.scacsports.com/members/index, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  15. ^ a b c "Men's Collegiate", Texas Rugby Union, 2011, http://texasrugbyunion.com/competitions/mens-collegiate/, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  16. ^ "Search Institutions Results", Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities, 2011, http://www.accunet.org/i4a/member_directory/feResultsListing.cfm?directory_id=18, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  17. ^ "Members", Council of Independent Colleges, 2011, http://www.cic.edu/about/membership/members.asp, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  18. ^ "Member Institutions", National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, 2011, http://www.naicu.edu/member_center/udallas, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  19. ^ a b "Institution Details: University of Dallas", Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Colleges, 2011, http://sacscoc.org/details.asp?instid=24880, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  20. ^ "Most Students Studying Abroad", U.S. News & World Report, 2011, http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/rankings/most-study-abroad, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  21. ^ (PDF) University of Dallas: 2011-2012 Bulletin, Irving, TX: University of Dallas, 2011, pp. 4–6, http://resource.udallas.edu/132/Bulletin2011-2012FINAL.pdf#page=5, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  22. ^ a b c d "University of Dallas, Overall Rankings", U.S. News & World Report, 2011, http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/university-of-dallas-224323/overall-rankings, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  23. ^ National Center for Education Statistics (2011), "University of Dallas", College Navigator (U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences), http://nces.ed.gov/collegenavigator/?q=university+of+dallas&s=all&id=224323#programs, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  24. ^ (PDF) DeAndreis-Rosati Memorial Archives Holdings: University of Dallas, Chicago: DePaul University, 2005, pp. 1–2, http://library.depaul.edu/Find/Collections/DRMAPdf/UniversityofDallas.pdf, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  25. ^ Jodziewicz, Thomas W., "Our Lady of Victory College", Handbook of Texas Online (The Texas State Historical Association), http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/kbo03, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  26. ^ a b c Bannon, Louis, "University of Dallas", Handbook of Texas Online (The Texas State Historical Association), http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/kbu02, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  27. ^ "The Founding of Our Lady of Dallas", Cistercian Abbey, Our Lady of Dallas (Cistercian Abbey, Our Lady of Dallas), 2011, http://www.cistercian.org/abbey/history/our-lady-of-dallas/founding.html, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  28. ^ "The History of Cistercian", Cistercian Preparatory School (Cistercian Preparatory School), 2011, http://www.cistercian.org/school/about/history3.html, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  29. ^ Landregan, Steve (2011), "A Brief History of Catholic Schools in the Diocese of Dallas", Catholic Schools, Diocese of Dallas (Diocese of Dallas), http://www.csodallas.org/AboutUs/History.html, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  30. ^ "Provincials", School Sisters of Notre Dame, Dallas Province (School Sisters of Notre Dame, Dallas Province), 2011, http://www.ssnddallas.org/pg_provincials.htm, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  31. ^ "UD's Fullbright Legacy", University of Dallas, 2011, http://www.udallas.edu/aboutus/about/fulbright, retrieved 23 September 2011 
  32. ^ "University of Dallas - Phi Betta Kappa Home", University of Dallas, 2011, http://www.udallas.edu/academics/undergrad/pbk, retrieved 23 September 2011 
  33. ^ Nelson, Heather (December 8, 2009). "Board selects Thomas W. Keefe as next president". The University News. http://media.www.udallasnews.com/media/storage/paper743/news/2009/12/08/News/Board.Selects.Thomas.W.Keefe.As.Next.President-3848137.shtml. Retrieved December 10, 2009. 
  34. ^ Do You Need a New Campus Master Plan?, College Planning & Management, http://www.peterli.com/cpm/resources/articles/archive.php?article_id=127, retrieved 24 September 2011 
  35. ^ a b c "University of Dallas", The Princeton Review, 2011, http://www.princetonreview.com/UniversityofDallas.aspx, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  36. ^ Orange Line Facts, Dallas Area Rapid Transit, http://www.dart.org/factsheet/orangeline/, retrieved 23 September 2011 
  37. ^ a b "Institutional Profile - Fall 2010", University of Dallas (University of Dallas), 2011, http://www.udallas.edu/aboutus/offices/ir/ip2010, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  38. ^ "Estimated Undergraduate Charges 2011/2012" (PDF), University of Dallas (University of Dallas), 2011, http://resource.udallas.edu/132/ListofChargesforthe2011-2012.pdf, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  39. ^ National Center for Education Statistics (2011), "University of Dallas", College Navigator (U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences), http://nces.ed.gov/collegenavigator/?q=university+of+Dallas&id=224323#retgrad, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  40. ^ http://www.udallas.edu/aboutus/offices/advancement/alumni/romereunion?init=1&return=http%3a%2f%2fwww.udallas.edu%2faboutus%2fabout%2fhistory%2fsearchresults
  41. ^ "The Annual Landregan Lecture", University of Dallas, School of Ministry (University of Dallas), 2011, http://www.udallas.edu/academics/ministry/somevents/landregan, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  42. ^ "America's Best Colleges". Forbes. 2011. http://www.forbes.com/top-colleges/list/. Retrieved October 6, 2011. 
  43. ^ "Regional Universities Rankings". America's Best Colleges 2012. U.S. News & World Report. September 13, 2011. http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/rankings/regional-universities. Retrieved September 25, 2011. 
  44. ^ "The Washington Monthly Master's University Rankings". The Washington Monthly. 2011. http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/college_guide/rankings_2011/masters_universities_rank.php. Retrieved October 6, 2011. 
  45. ^ "Master's University Rankings 2011", Washington Monthly, 2011, http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/college_guide/rankings_2011/masters_universities_rank.php, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  46. ^ "Top Universities Regional West", Webometrics Ranking Web of World Universities, 2011, http://www.webometrics.info/region_usacan.asp?reg=natwest, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  47. ^ "University of Dallas", Forbes, 2011, http://www.forbes.com/colleges/university-of-dallas/, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  48. ^ "University of Dallas", What Will They Learn?, 2011, http://www.whatwilltheylearn.com/schools/3136, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  49. ^ "Parade's College A-List: Arts Programs", Parade, 2010, http://www.parade.com/news/2010/08/22-college-a-list-arts-programs.html?index=21, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  50. ^ Moore, Matthew J. (April 2010), "Political Theory Today: Results of a National Survey" (PDF), PS: Political Science & Politics: 271, http://resource.udallas.edu/132/APSApoltheorysurvey.pdf, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  51. ^ "Best Business Schools". US News and World Report. http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-business-schools/mba-rankings. Retrieved 6 August 2011. 
  52. ^ "The Best U.S. B-Schools of 2010". BusinessWeek. http://www.businessweek.com/interactive_reports/bs_2010_US_FTMBA_TAB_1111.html. Retrieved 6 August 2011. 
  53. ^ "The Best Business Schools, 2011". Forbes. http://www.forbes.com/lists/2011/95/best-business-schools-11_rank.html. Retrieved 6 August 2011. 
  54. ^ "Which MBA? | 2010 Full time MBA rankings". The Economist. http://www.economist.com/whichmba/2010/free-ranking-tool. Retrieved 6 August 2011. 
  55. ^ "Global MBA Rankings 2011". Financial Times. http://rankings.ft.com/businessschoolrankings/global-mba-rankings-2011. Retrieved 6 August 2011. 
  56. ^ Leiter, Brian (2009), The Philosophical Gourmet Report, Blackwell, http://www.philosophicalgourmet.com/overall.asp, retrieved 28 September 2011 
  57. ^ "Social Sciences and Humanities Ranking Methodology", U.S. News & World Report, 2011, http://www.usnews.com/education/best-graduate-schools/articles/2011/03/14/social-sciences-and-humanities-rankings-methodology-2012, retrieved 23 September 2011 
  58. ^ "Assessment of Research Doctorate Programs", National Research Council, 2010, http://sites.nationalacademies.org/PGA/Resdoc/index.htm, retrieved 23 September 2011 
  59. ^ http://graduate-school.phds.org/rankings/english/rank/__M_____________________________________________________________U
  60. ^ http://graduate-school.phds.org/rankings/philosophy/rank/__M_____________________________________________________________U
  61. ^ http://graduate-school.phds.org/rankings/political-science/rank/__M_____________________________________________________________U
  62. ^ "U-CAN: University of Dallas", U-CAN, http://members.ucan-network.org/udallas, retrieved 22 September 2011 
  63. ^ http://www.wc.com/eflood
  64. ^ "Peter MacNicol Biography". TV Guide. http://www.tvguide.com/detail/celebrity.aspx?tvobjectid=170007&more=ucCelebInfo. Retrieved 2007-01-25. 
  65. ^ http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=665
  66. ^ http://www.last.fm/music/Trish+Murphy
  67. ^ http://frontrow.dmagazine.com/2011/06/why-david-holzman%E2%80%99s-diary-still-matters/%7Cwork=D Magazine}}
  68. ^ Drake, Tim, "Resignations Rock University of Dallas," National Catholic Register, May 19, 2001.
  69. ^ Allen, John Jr, "A 'Dallas experiment' in orthodoxy and openness," National Catholic Reporter, February 5, 2010.
  70. ^ Drake, Tim, "Raid or Rescue?", CatholicCulture.org, September 27, 2001.
  71. ^ Carl, Katy, "Why the Institute became a School," National Catholic Register, May 27, 2007.
  72. ^ http://media.www.udallasnews.com/media/storage/paper743/news/2008/02/19/Commentary/Letter.To.The.Editor-3219795.shtml
  73. ^ "Trouble Brewing at UD Again?" A Blog for Dallas Area Catholics, 03-03-2011
  74. ^ Regarding homosexuality see Walsh, Jerome T. "Leviticus 18:22 and 20:13: Who Is Doing What To Whom?" Journal of Biblical Literature, Vol. 12, No. 2, (Summer 2001), pg. 209.
  75. ^ Regarding women priests, see the statement put forth by Sr. Dorothy Jonaitis, OP at "OP: One Planet, One People, One Teaching: The 2005 Convocation of the Federation of Dominican Sisters," Chicago, IL, April 21–24.
  76. ^ Video Message from Bishop Farrell, dated 03-03-2011.
  77. ^ Letter from Bishop Vann, dated 03-02-2011
  78. ^ Beeler, Randall, "The University of Dallas: Will Ye Be Faithful to the Cor? An Open Letter to President Thomas Keefe." The Catholic Comedy, March 2, 2011
  79. ^ See Bauman, Michelle, "Fidelity of New Pastoral Ministry Program Questioned," Catholic News Agency, March 6, 2011.
  80. ^ See also Weatherbe, Steve, "Crack in the Wall of Orthodoxy?" National Catholic Register, March 30, 2011.
  81. ^ Slater, Shelly, "Punch Comment by University of Dallas President Spurs Backlash," WFAA.com, March 11, 2011.
  82. ^ Diodati, Monica, "School of Ministry Dean Responds to Controversy," The University News, March 22, 2011.
  83. ^ "President Keefe of the University of Dallas on Pastoral Ministry (Part Three)", YouTube, accessed 03-06-2011

Further Reading

  • Sweet, David, ed. University of Dallas: 50 Years of Vision & Courage, 1956-2006. (2006). 165 pp.
  • University of Dallas. The University of Dallas honoring William A. Blakley. (1966). 19 pp.

External links


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Chancellor of the University of Dallas — The Chancellor of the University of Dallas is the current Bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Dallas according to section 2a of the University of Dallas bylaws. The current Chancellor is Bishop Kevin J. Farrell. Previous Chancellors have been …   Wikipedia

  • The University News (University of Dallas) — The University News is the official weekly student newspaper of the University of Dallas in Irving, Texas, United States. The newspaper emphasizes its editorial independence in its mission statement:cite web|title=General… …   Wikipedia

  • Graduate School of Management (University of Dallas) — The Graduate School of Management (GSM) at the University of Dallas enrolls approximately 1,600 students in its programs, which are offered in the classroom (at the Irving, Tarrant County, and Frisco campuses), onsite at corporate partner… …   Wikipedia

  • Merriman Park/University Manor, Dallas, Texas — Merriman Park/University Manor Country United States State Texas Counties Dallas City Dallas Area White Rock Lake …   Wikipedia

  • Dallas Baptist University — Established 1898 as Decatur Baptist College Type Private, (Protestant) Baptist University Endowment …   Wikipedia

  • Dallas Christian College — Motto κηρύξον τον λογον (Preach the Word) Established 1950 Type Private …   Wikipedia

  • University of Mary Hardin–Baylor — Established 1845 Type Private, Baptist …   Wikipedia

  • University of Mary — Motto America s Leadership University Established 1959 Type Private Endowment $2 …   Wikipedia

  • Dallas — This article is about the city in the U.S. state of Texas. For other uses, see Dallas (disambiguation). Dallas, Texas   City   Dallas …   Wikipedia

  • Dallas, Texas — Infobox Settlement official name = City of Dallas settlement type = City nickname = Big D, D Town motto = Live Large. Think Big. imagesize = image caption = image #ifeq:Dallas, Texas|Dallas, Texas|Dallas seal.png| mapsize = 250px map caption =… …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.