College lacrosse


College lacrosse
For current information on this topic, see 2011 NCAA Division I Men's Lacrosse Championship.

College lacrosse refers to lacrosse played by student athletes at colleges and universities in the United States and Canada. In both countries, men's field lacrosse and women's lacrosse are played in both the varsity and club levels. College lacrosse in Canada is sponsored by the Canadian University Field Lacrosse Association, while in the United States, varsity men's and women's lacrosse is sponsored by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).

In the U.S., as of the 2010-11 academic year, there were 61 NCAA-sanctioned Division I men's lacrosse teams, 42 Division II men's lacrosse teams and 179 Division III men's lacrosse teams, as well as 91 Division I women's lacrosse teams, 61 Division II women's lacrosse teams, and 206 Division III women's lacrosse teams. There were also 30 men's programs and 18 women's programs at at two-year community colleges organized by the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) and a growing number of National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) four-year small college programs.

As of 2009-10, there were 213 collegiate men's club teams competing through the Men's Collegiate Lacrosse Association (MCLA), including most major universities in the United States without NCAA Men's programs, organized into two divisions and ten conferences. Schools that feature a Division 1 program typically play in Division 1, where schools who have NCAA Division 2, Division 3, or NAIA distinction play in Division 2 of the MCLA. The MCLA is structured to give the high number of lacrosse players playing at the high school level, an outlet to play competitive collegiate lacrosse regardless of their location. High caliber programs competing in the MCLA often operate as "virtual varsity" teams, often competing against NCAA Division III and II teams. The MCLA currently holds its national championship tournament at Dick's Sporting Goods Park located in Denver, Colorado. This tournament is a 16 team tournament for both Division 1 and Division 2 programs and features a live broadcast of semi-final and championship contests.

In 2009-10, there were another 99 schools with men's club teams in the National College Lacrosse League (NCLL), again, often at schools with existing NCAA programs. As of 2009-10, there were also 237 collegiate club teams for women organized by the Women's Collegiate Lacrosse Associates (WCLA).

Contents

History of college lacrosse

The first intercollegiate game in the United States was played on November 22, 1877 between New York University and Manhattan College.[1][2] Lacrosse had been introduced in upstate New York in the 1860s. Lacrosse was further introduced to the Baltimore area in the 1890s. These two areas continue to be the hotbeds of college lacrosse in the U.S. The first intercollegiate lacrosse tournament was held in 1881, with Harvard beating Princeton, 3-0, in the championship game.[3]

From this point through 1934, collegiate lacrosse associations chose an annual champion based on regular season records. The U. S. Amateur Lacrosse Association was founded in 1879, while seven colleges formed the first Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association three years later. That was succeeded in 1905 by the Intercollegiate Lacrosse League. The USILL acted as the governing body for lacrosse in the United States until it was replaced by the United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association in 1926. The USILA was reorganized in 1929, and from 1934 through 1970 chose the Wingate Memorial Trophy champion.

At their 1969 annual meeting in Baltimore, the United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association voted for its first playoff tournament to determine the national winner. In 1971, the NCAA began sponsoring Men's Lacrosse and began holding an annual Championship tournament for Division I schools. The NCAA added a 'small college' tournament for all non-Division I schools for the 1972 and 1973 seasons, a Division II and III tournament for the 1974 through 1979 seasons, and finally separate tournaments for Divisions II and III beginning in 1980.

NCAA Men's Lacrosse

NCAA Lacrosse logo

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) is a the largest association and governing body of collegiate athletics in the United States with over 1,280 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs.[4] The NCAA holds lacrosse championships for all three Divisions in men's and women's lacrosse. Currently the NCAA has 264 men's lacrosse programs and 349 women's lacrosse programs.

Division I Men's Lacrosse

A map of NCAA Division I men's lacrosse teams.
UNC vs. Duke (2009).

From 1934 through 1970 The United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association (USILA) awarded the Wingate Memorial Trophy to the NCAA annual champion based on regular season records. Beginning in 1971, the National Collegiate Athletic Association began holding an annual NCAA Men's Lacrosse Championship tournament.[5]

There are currently 61 NCAA Division I men's lacrosse teams organized into nine conferences and five teams who play as independent DI programs, without a conference affiliation.[6]

Conferences:

Division II Men's Lacrosse

A map of NCAA Division II men's lacrosse teams.

Division II men's lacrosse currently has the smallest number of teams compared to the Division I and Division III levels. Division II lacrosse is made up of 42 teams mainly located in the Northeast and Southeast. The NCAA added a 'small college' lacrosse championship tournament in 1971. Division II men's lacrosse held its first NCAA tournament in 1974 as an eight-team bracket. The format remained the same until 1980 when the field dropped to just two teams. In 2001, a legislative change resulted in a move to a four-team bracket, which is the current model to date. The Division II men’s lacrosse championship bracket will expand from four to eight teams beginning with the 2013 season.[7] Adelphi University currently holds the record for the number of DII championships, with seven and also appeared in the championship a record 11 times.[8]

The 42 NCAA Division II lacrosse programs are organized into five conferences. In addition there is a number of independent programs consisting of mainly new DII lacrosse teams.[9]

Conferences:

Division III Men's Lacrosse

A map of NCAA Division III men's lacrosse teams.

Division III men's lacrosse currently has number of teams in NCAA men's lacrosse. The 179 programs are more than the combined number of Division I and II men's lacrosse programs. The majority of Division III lacrosse teams are located in the Northeast, with only five programs west of the Mississippi River. Division III Championship originally was a combined 'small college' championship from 1971-1979 before the NCAA split the non-Division I schools into separate Division II and III tournaments in in 1980.[10] Hobart has made a record 14 appearances in the championship game and won a total of 13 championships. Hobart lacrosse also won the championship the first 12 years it was held from 1980-1991, the 12 consecutive championships are an NCAA record.[11]

The 179 NCAA Division III lacrosse programs are organized into twenty conferences. In addition there are nearly 20 independent programs.[12]

Conferences:

NCAA Women's Lacrosse

Women's college lacrosse differ significantly from men's lacrosse in terms of rules and equipment. The NCAA holds lacrosse championships for all three Divisions and currently the NCAA has 349 women's lacrosse programs. Women's collegiate lacrosse was originally governed by the Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women championships (AIAW). The AIAW held championships from 1978-1982 before being dissolved into the NCAA. The NCAA began sponsoring a Division III championship in 1985 and added a Division II championship in 2001.

Division I Women's Lacrosse

A map of NCAA Division I women's lacrosse teams.

The NCAA began sponsoring a NCAA Women's Lacrosse Championship|women's lacrosse championship]] in 1982. Lacrosse has grown into over 90 NCAA Division I women's lacrosse teams organized into 12 conferences and a number of programs who play without a conference affiliation.[13] The Big South Conference will add women's lacrosse in the 2012-13 academic year, becoming the 13th conference to sponsor the sport.[14]

Conferences:

Division II Women's Lacrosse

There are 57 programs competing at the Division II women's lacrosse teams. Division II women's lacrosse is one of the newest Championships sponsored by the NCAA, the first Division II women's lacrosse championship was held in 2001 when C.W. Post beat West Chester 13-9.[15] Since then the Division II level has been dominated, much like its men's counterpart, by Adelphi University. Adelphi women's lacrosse has won 4 championships including the previous two in 2009 and 2010.[15]

The 57 NCAA Division II women's lacrosse programs are organized into six conferences. In addition there is a number of independent programs.[16]

Conferences:

Division III Women's Lacrosse

The NCAA Division III level is made up of 206 Division III women's lacrosse teams. It is the largest women's lacrosse division and also the largest NCAA lacrosse division including men's and women's, surpassing the men's Division III by about 30 members.[17]

Conferences:

NAIA Lacrosse

There are a growing number of National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) schools that offer lacrosse, although the sport is not an officially recognized sport by the NAIA.[18] Currently, NAIA programs primarily compete at the club level with roughly 25 men's NAIA lacrosse programs primarily playing within the Men's Collegiate Lacrosse Association (MCLA) and 14 women's programs primarily playing within the Women's Collegiate Lacrosse Associates (WCLA). NAIA programs also regularly compete against NCAA DII and DIII teams.[19] In 2010, six NAIA women's lacrosse programs formed the National Women's Lacrosse League which began play as a women's-only NAIA lacrosse conference in Spring 2011.[20]

NJCAA Lacrosse

The National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) is the primary governing body of community college athletic programs in the USA and currently oversees 27 men's and 18 women's lacrosse programs predominately in the Northeastern United States. The NJCAA lacrosse programs do not compete in their regular conferences, but instead are ranked within their NJCAA Regions. The NJCAA has sponsored a men's lacrosse championship since 1970 and a women's lacrosse championship since 2004.[21][22] There are also new lacrosse programs at community colleges that are not members of the NJCAA, such as the California Community College Athletic Association, which does not sponsor the sport at this time.

Men's Club Lacrosse

Men's Collegiate Lacrosse Association (MCLA)

MCLA Lacrosse logo
Lindenwood vs. Miami (FL) in an MCLA DI game (2010).

The Men's Collegiate Lacrosse Association (MCLA), formerly known as the US Lacrosse Men’s Division of Intercollegiate Associates (USL MDIA), is a national organization of non-NCAA, college men's lacrosse programs. The MCLA was created by the MDIA Board of Directors and its creation was announced by US Lacrosse on August 24, 2006. The MCLA oversees play and conducts national championships for almost 200 non-NCAA men's lacrosse programs in nine conferences and in two divisions throughout the country. Many NAIA lacrosse teams compete in this league while waiting for the association to recognize the sport on a championship level.[23]

Conferences:

National College Lacrosse League (NCLL)

The National College Lacrosse League (NCLL) is a men's lacrosse league comprising mostly Eastern US college lacrosse clubs (non-varsity). There are approximately 80 teams divided into 12 conferences. The programs are split into Division I and Division II. Many of the clubs are at schools that currently have varsity NCAA Men's lacrosse programs.

Conferences:

  • Blue Ridge Conference
  • Capitol Conference
  • Chesapeake Conference
  • Eastern Pennsylvania Conference
  • Empire East Conference
  • Empire West Conference
  • Keystone Conference
  • Liberty Conference
  • Midwest North Conference
  • Midwest South Conference
  • NY Metro Conference
  • Tidewater Conference

Other US college club lacrosse leagues

Women's club lacrosse

Women's Collegiate Lacrosse Associates (WCLA)

The Women's Collegiate Lacrosse Associates (WCLA) is a collection of nearly 200 college club teams that compete under the US Lacrosse umbrella. There are 12 leagues composing the association along with a category for independents. However, by 2012, all WCLA members must be affiliated with a league. The Association regulates different aspects of the teams including minimum number of games played. A recent modification the WCLA has made to the rules allows Community Colleges to become members. Team's that have been classified as either Division I or Division II have the opportunity to compete in a national championship each spring under US Lacrosse.

WCLA National Tournament History
  • 2011: Colorado State - Defeated UCLA 11-9
  • 2010: Colorado State - Defeated Cal Poly 6-4
  • 2009: Virginia Tech - Defeated Colorado 17-9
  • 2008: Colorado State - Defeated Cal Poly 8-5 (OT)
  • 2007: Cal Poly - Defeated Navy 16-9
  • 2006: Cal Poly - Defeated Michigan 12-7
  • 2005: Cal Poly - Defeated Colorado State 14-3
  • 2004: Cal Poly - Defeated Santa Clara 15-4
  • 2003: Cal Poly - Defeated UCLA 11-9
  • 2002: Cal Poly - Defeated Air Force 10-5
  • 2001: Cal Poly - Defeated Navy 13-6
Institution National Designation
Eastern Illinois University Provisional
Ferris State University D II
Florida Atlantic University Provisional
University of Colorado D I

See also

References

  1. ^ "History – Lacrosse". HickokSports.com. http://www.hickoksports.com/history/lacrosse.shtml. Retrieved May 30, 2009. 
  2. ^ "Lacrosse History". STX. http://www.stxlacrosse.com/theculture/history.cfm. Retrieved May 30, 2009. [dead link]
  3. ^ "Lacrosse History: The Birth of Modern North American Lacrosse 1850-1900". E-Lacrosse. http://www.e-lacrosse.com/laxhist5.htm. Retrieved May 30, 2009. 
  4. ^ Canadian college granted entrance into NCAA DII[dead link]
  5. ^ "DI Men's Lacrosse Championship History". NCAA. http://www.ncaa.com/history/lacrosse-men/d1. Retrieved April 14, 2011. 
  6. ^ "Men's Division I Conference Standings". Inside Lacrosse. http://games.insidelacrosse.com/standings/league/1/DI. Retrieved April 14, 2011. 
  7. ^ "DII men’s lacrosse bracket to expand to eight teams". NCAA. http://www.ncaa.org/wps/wcm/connect/public/NCAA/Resources/Latest+News/2011/May/DII+mens+lacrosse+bracket+to+expand+to+eight+teams. Retrieved June 2, 2011. 
  8. ^ "DII Men's Lacrosse Championship History". NCAA. http://www.ncaa.com/history/lacrosse-men/d2. Retrieved April 14, 2011. 
  9. ^ "Men's Division II Conference Standings". Inside Lacrosse. http://games.insidelacrosse.com/standings/league/2/DII. Retrieved April 14, 2011. 
  10. ^ "DIII Men's Lacrosse Championship History". NCAA. http://www.ncaa.com/history/lacrosse-men/d3. Retrieved April 14, 2011. 
  11. ^ "Hobart To Move Back To Division III". LAX.com. April 26, 2008. http://www.lax.com/story.phtml?story=2051. Retrieved April 14, 2011. 
  12. ^ "Men's Division III Conference Standings". Inside Lacrosse. http://games.insidelacrosse.com/standings/league/3/DIII. Retrieved April 14, 2011. 
  13. ^ "Women's Division I Conference Standings". Inside Lacrosse. http://games.insidelacrosse.com/standings/league/7/WDI. Retrieved April 14, 2011. 
  14. ^ "Big South to sponsor women’s lacrosse". NCAA. June 9, 2011. http://www.ncaa.org/wps/wcm/connect/public/NCAA/Resources/Latest+News/2011/June/Big+South+to+sponsor+womens+lacrosse. Retrieved July 19, 2011. 
  15. ^ a b "DII Women's Lacrosse Championship History". NCAA. http://www.ncaa.com/history/lacrosse-women/d2. Retrieved April 14, 2011. 
  16. ^ "Women's Division II Computer Rating". LaxPower.com. http://www.laxpower.com/update11/binwom/rating02.php. Retrieved April 14, 2011. 
  17. ^ "Women's Division II Computer Rating". LaxPower.com. http://www.laxpower.com/update11/binwom/rating03.php. Retrieved April 14, 2011. 
  18. ^ "Walsh Launches New Men's Lacrosse Club". Walsh University. https://www.walsh.edu/news.php?newsid=414. Retrieved April 14, 2011. 
  19. ^ Smith, Jason (Dec 17, 2010). "OBU to add football, swimming, lacrosse". News-Star. http://www.news-star.com/sports/college/x719365649/OBU-to-add-football-swimming-lacrosse. Retrieved April 14, 2011. 
  20. ^ "Brand new NWLL announces charter members". NWLL. November 17, 2010. http://www.nwll.net/seasons/2010-11/releases/creation. Retrieved April 14, 2011. 
  21. ^ "NJCAA Men's Champions". NJCAA. 2010. http://www.njcaa.org/news/NEW%20RECORD%20BOOK/Mens_Lacrosse_Records_12-10-10.pdf. Retrieved April 14, 2011. 
  22. ^ "NJCAA Women's Champions". NJCAA. 2010. http://www.njcaa.org/news/NEW%20RECORD%20BOOK/Updatedwlacrosse081810.pdf. Retrieved April 14, 2011. 
  23. ^ "US Lacrosse Announces the Formation of the MCLA". CollegeLax.us. August 24, 2006. http://www.collegelax.us/news.php?action=fullnews&id=791. Retrieved 2008-05-06. 

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