Doctor Who Magazine


Doctor Who Magazine
Doctor Who Magazine

Doctor Who Weekly issue 1, cover dated 17 October 1979
Editor Tom Spilsbury
Categories Science fiction television
Frequency Every four weeks
Circulation 35,374 (ABC figure as of 12 August 2010)
First issue 17 October 1979 (441 issues as of 17 November 2011)
Company Panini Comics
Country United Kingdom
Language English
Website Panini listing
ISSN 0957-9818

Doctor Who Magazine (abbreviated as DWM) is a magazine devoted to the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. Its current editor is Tom Spilsbury. It is the current Guinness Book of World Records holder for the longest running TV Tie-in.

Contents

History

Officially sanctioned by the BBC, the magazine began life as Doctor Who Weekly in 1979, published by the UK arm of Marvel Comics. The first issue was released on Thursday 11 October with a cover date of 17 October and priced 12p.

The magazine moved from weekly to monthly publication with issue 44 in September 1980, becoming Doctor Who (the tagline "A Marvel Monthly" was not part of the name, but simply a description which appeared on many of Marvel UK's monthly titles at that point) and a cover price of 30p. The title changed to Doctor Who Monthly with issue 61 and The Official Doctor Who Magazine with issue 85 in February 1984. It became The Doctor Who Magazine with issue 99 in April 1985, and simply Doctor Who Magazine with issue 107 in December 1985. The magazine has remained under that title ever since, although an exception was made for issue 397 in June 2008 when the cover only featured the words Bad Wolf following transmission of the Doctor Who episode "Turn Left" on Saturday 21 June. In 1990 the magazine started appearing once every four weeks (13 times a year). Despite the BBC discontinuing production of Doctor Who in 1989, the magazine continued to be published, providing new adventures in the form of comics. The television programme was revived in 2005, providing a new generation of fans which the magazine was seeking to attract.

Originally geared towards children, DWM has grown into a more mature magazine exploring the behind-the-scenes aspects of the series.[citation needed] Due to its longevity, it is seen as a source of 'official' and exclusive information, sharing a close relationship with the television production team and the BBC. In 2006, however, it lost its exclusivity when BBC Worldwide launched its own comic, Doctor Who Adventures, aimed at a younger audience.

DWM is now published by Panini Comics, which purchased the title along with the rest of the Marvel UK catalogue in 1995. Panini has begun to digitally restore and reprint older DWM comics in trade paperback format. Twelve volumes have been printed so far: two featuring the comics adventures of the Fourth Doctor, one with the adventures of the Fifth Doctor, two featuring the Sixth Doctor, one with the adventures of the Seventh Doctor, four focusing on the Eighth Doctor, and two featuring the Tenth Doctor. Panini also published a one-shot magazine-format reprinting of the complete Ninth Doctor strips in 2006 and most of the Tenth Doctor and Martha Jones strips in 2008. DWM issue 426 reported that the series has been postponed, although Panini hopes to be able to continue it in the future.

Doctor Who Magazine Issue 417 (January 2010)

DWM's 400th issue was published in September 2008, and the publication celebrated its 30th anniversary in October 2009. In April 2010, it was confirmed in issue 420 that Doctor Who Magazine now holds the Guinness World Record for "Longest Running Magazine Based on a Television Series."[1]

In April 2011, Panini Comics released a new monthly magazine titled Doctor Who Insider, although it is made in Britain the magazine is published for North America.

Content

DWM features an ongoing comic starring the current incarnation of the Doctor, though for a period between 1989 and 1996, when the series was off the air, it featured previous Doctors. Notable writers and artists who have worked on the comic include John Wagner, Pat Mills, Alan Moore, Grant Morrison, Dave Gibbons, Mike McMahon, John Ridgway and Ian Edginton. Selected stories from the comic were also reprinted in North America by Marvel Comics. Supporting characters that have crossed over from the comic to other spin-off media include Frobisher, the shape-changing companion of the Sixth and Seventh Doctors; Abslom Daak, the Dalek Killer; the Special Executive, who would later appear in Marvel's Captain Britain; and the villainous Beep the Meep.

The magazine has also featured other comics over the years, most notably "Doctor Who?", a humorous look at the series by Tim Quinn and Dicky Howett. This was principally a three-panel comic strip, though occasionally page-long parodies were featured. A currently running strip, and Doctor Who?'s spiritual successor, is a single-panel strip "Doctor Whoah!". Embedded into the Galaxy Forum letters page, it lampoons a recent episode, DVD release of stories or other such event by showing alternative, exaggerated and expanded versions of Doctor Who scenes. For example, after the broadcast of "Partners in Crime", the strip portrayed the Doctor's arrival on the "Planet of the Hats", referred to in the episode. Between 1989 and 92 "The Comic Assassins" was a series of parody strips by Steve Noble and Kev F. Sutherland.

In the 1990s a secondary serious comic was featured on the inside cover; for many issues this was "The Cybermen", a series of tales set on Mondas prior to the events of The Tenth Planet, explaining the back-history of the Cybermen. The TV Century 21 comic "The Daleks" was also resurrected, continuing the story from where it had left off by showing the Daleks attacking Earth; it was drawn in the same style as the 1960s original.

Other regular features of the magazine include the news section "Gallifrey Guardian", which has run since nearly the beginning of the magazine; the letters page "Galaxy Forum"; reviews of television episodes and merchandise (in "The DWM Review", known for a time as "After Image", "Off the Shelf", and "Shelf Life"); the "Matrix Data Bank" page, where readers' Doctor Who questions are answered; the "Time Team", which involves four fans watching every Doctor Who story in order from the beginning; and, since production restarted on the series in 2004, a regular column "Production Notes" by the show's executive producer. From 2004 to 2009 the column was written by Russell T Davies, and since January 2010, Steven Moffat has taken over the page, although other writers and production staff have from time-to-time written the column.

A single-page 'opinion' column has often been part of the magazine's mix – past columns have included "Fluid Links" by Matt Jones, "The Life and Times of Jackie Jenkins" by 'Jackie Jenkins', "It's the End... But" by 'The Watcher' and "You Are Not Alone" by Neil Harris.

The format has changed over the years, but the news, letters, reviews, and comic strip have all been present consistently since the early 1980s. The magazine also features a 'Who On Earth Is...' section, which showcases a brief interview with someone involved in 'Doctor Who'. This article features usually at the back of the magazine.

The magazine also features interviews with the cast and crew of the television show (including the old episodes), and reports from the set of the current series, written by Benjamin Cook or Jason Arnopp. The behind-the-scenes stories of all of the 1963–1989 episodes have been documented in Andrew Pixley's "DWM Archive", and detailed analysis of certain significant serials are covered in "The Fact of Fiction", usually written by former DWM editor Alan Barnes or David Bailey. "The DWM Review" is currently written predominantly by Graham Kibble-White, former editor Gary Gillatt, Vanessa Bishop, and Matt Michael. Previous reviewers include the late Craig Hinton (who went on to write Doctor Who novels), and Gary Russell, who subsequently became the magazine's editor.

In 2004 Russell T Davies offered to let the magazine write and publish the official regeneration scene from the Eighth to the Ninth Doctor as part of its ongoing comic strip prior to the relaunch of the TV series. Although work was done on this storyline, then editor Clayton Hickman and writer Scott Gray eventually turned down the offer as they felt they couldn’t do such an important event justice under the constraints imposed by the TV series' continuity.[2]

Editors

Editor Duration Issues Range Total
Dez Skinn 1979–1980 1–22 22
Paul Neary 1980–1981 23–48 26
Alan McKenzie 1981–1985 49–96 48
Sheila Cranna 1985–1988 97 & 107–136 31
Cefn Ridout 1985 98–106 9
John Freeman 1988–1992 137–185 49
Gary Russell 1992–1995 186–222 37
Gary Gillatt 1995–2000 223–254, 256–292 69
Sophie Aldred 1997 255 1
Alan Barnes 2000–2001 293–312 20
Clayton Hickman 2002–2007 313–386 74
Tom Spilsbury 2007– 387- 55*

* Ongoing (up to Issue 441)

Special editions

From 2002 Doctor Who Magazine began producing an irregular series of "Special Editions" – stand alone magazines themed around a specific topic and carrying a much higher page count than the regular magazine. Previously, the magazine had released seasonal and irregular one-shot special editions with various titles.

  1. The Complete Fifth Doctor (March 2002, 68 pages): A detailed look at the complete run of Fifth Doctor stories and their various spin offs. This included in-depth articles on the production the seasons and updates on DWM 's original Archive features on the serials (by Andrew Pixley), a short essay on a specific aspect of each of the TV stories (by various fan/writers) and detailed overviews of the Fifth Doctor's appearances in comics (by John Ainsworth, novels (by Matt Michael) and audio plays (by Gary Gillatt; authorships of these features are consistent across the range of original TV programme's Complete _ Doctor volumes).
  2. The Complete Third Doctor (July 2002, 84 pages): A detailed look at the complete run of Third Doctor stories and their various spin offs. This included in-depth articles on the production of each of the seasons covered and Archive updates on each serial, a short essay on a specific aspect of each of the TV stories and detailed overviews of the Third Doctor's appearances in comics, novels and audio (in this case, strictly radio) plays.
  3. The Complete Sixth Doctor (September 2002, 68 pages): A detailed look at the complete run of Sixth Doctor stories and their various spin offs. This included in-depth articles on the production of each of the seasons covered and Archive updates on each serial, a short essay on a specific aspect of each of the TV stories and detailed overviews of the Sixth Doctor's appearances in comics, novels and audio plays.
  4. The Complete Second Doctor (January 2003, 84 pages): A detailed look at the complete run of Second Doctor stories and their various spin offs. This included in-depth articles on the production of each of the seasons covered and Archive updates on each serial, a short essay on a specific aspect of each of the TV stories and detailed overviews of the Second Doctor's appearances in comics and novels.
  5. The Complete Eighth Doctor (July 2003, 84 pages): A detailed look at the Eighth Doctor and his various spin offs. This included a detailed archive feature on the making of the 1996 TV movie, a look at the history of Doctor Who in the intervening years following the end of the TV show and a detailed overview of the Eighth Doctor's appearances in comics, novels and audio plays.
  6. We Love Doctor Who (November 2003, 84 pages): Celebrating the 40th anniversary of the first broadcast of the TV show readers of Doctor Who Magazine had been asked to vote for their all time favourite aspects of the show in various categories. This magazine published the results and essays on the most popular TV stories, books, comics, writers and contributors.
  7. The Complete First Doctor (January 2004, 100 pages): A detailed look at the complete run of First Doctor stories and their various spin offs. This included in-depth articles on the production of each of the seasons covered and Archive updates on each serial, a short essay on a specific aspect of each of the TV stories and detailed overviews of the First Doctor's appearances in comics and novels.
  8. The Complete Fourth Doctor – Volume One (July 2004, 84 pages): A detailed look at the run of the first four seasons of Fourth Doctor TV stories. This included in-depth articles on the production of each of the seasons covered and Archive updates on each serial, plus a short essay on a specific aspect of each of the TV stories.
  9. The Complete Fourth Doctor – Volume Two (October 2004, 84 pages): A detailed look at the final three seasons of the Fourth Doctor TV stories. This included in-depth articles on the production of each of the seasons covered and a short essay on a specific aspect of each of the TV stories and Archive updates on each serial, plus a detailed overview of the Fourth Doctor's appearances in comics and novels.
  10. The Complete Seventh Doctor (February 2005, 100 pages): A detailed look at the complete run of Seventh Doctor stories and their various spin offs. This included in-depth articles on the production of each of the seasons covered and Archive updates on each serial, a short essay on a specific aspect of each of the TV stories and detailed overviews of the Seventh Doctor's appearances in comics, audio plays and novels. There was also an errata section correcting some errors in the previously published volumes.
  11. The Doctor Who Companion – Series One (July 2005, 100 pages): A guide to the production of the recently aired first series of the revived TV show. This included a detailed look at the production of each of the episodes by Andrew Pixley, articles on aspects of the design work on various episodes, a look at some of the special effects, a profile of the Ninth Doctor and the original series pitch with annotated notes by show runner Russell T Davies.
  12. In Their Own Words – Volume One 1963–1969 (November 2005, 100 pages): A chronological commentary on the making of the TV series in the 1960s by those involved in its production. This is collated from extracts of interviews previously published in Doctor Who Magazine with the individuals concerned.
  13. The Ninth Doctor Collected Comics (April 2006, 100 pages): A reprint of all the Ninth Doctor comic strip stories published by Panini Comics. This includes:
    • "The Love Invasion" (Doctor Who Magazine issue 355–357, written by Gareth Roberts, art by Mike Collins)
    • "Art Attack" (Doctor Who Magazine issue 358, art and story by Mike Collins)
    • "The Cruel Sea" (Doctor Who Magazine issue 359–362, written by Robert Shearman, art by Mike Collins)
    • "Mr Nobody" (Doctor Who Annual 2006, written by Scott Gray, art by John Ross)
    • "A Groatsworth of Wit" (Doctor Who Magazine issue 363–364, written by Gareth Roberts, art by Mike Collins)
  14. The Doctor Who Companion – Series Two (August 2006, 108 pages): A guide to the production of the recently aired second series of the revived TV show. This included a detailed look at the production of each of the episodes by Andrew Pixley and the original second series pitch with annotated notes by show runner Russell T Davies.
  15. In Their Own Words – Volume 2 1970–1976 (November 2006, 100 pages): A chronological commentary on the making of the TV series in the first part of the 1970s by those involved in its production. This is collated from extracts of interviews previously published in Doctor Who Magazine with the individuals concerned.
  16. In Their Own Words – Volume 3 1977–1981 (April 2007, 100 pages): A chronological commentary on the making of the TV series in the latter part of the 1970s and start of the 1980s by those involved in its production. This is collated from extracts of interviews previously published in Doctor Who Magazine with the individuals concerned.
  17. The Doctor Who Companion – Series Three (August 2007, 132 pages): A guide to the production of the recently aired third series of the revived TV show. This included a detailed look at the production of each of the episodes by Andrew Pixley and an overview of the development of the series by show runner Russell T Davies.
  18. In Their Own Words – Volume 4 1982–1986 (November 2007, 100 pages): A chronological commentary on the making of the TV series in the 1980s by those involved in its production. This is collated from extracts of interviews previously published in Doctor Who Magazine with the individuals concerned.
  19. The Tenth Doctor Comics (April 2008, 100 pages): A reprint of most of the Tenth Doctor and Martha Jones comic strip stories published by Panini Comics. This includes:
    • "The Woman Who Sold the World" (Doctor Who Magazine issue 381–384, written by Rob Davis, art by Mike Collins)
    • "Bus Stop!" (Doctor Who Magazine issue 385, written by Rob Davis, art by John Ross)
    • "The First" (Doctor Who Magazine issue 386–389, written by Dan McDaid, art by Martin Geraghty)
    • "Death to the Doctor!" (Doctor Who Magazine issue 390, written by Jonathan Morris, art by Roger Langridge)
  20. The Doctor Who Companion – Series Four (August 2008, 148 pages): A guide to the production of the recently aired fourth series of the revived TV show. This included a detailed look at the production of each of the episodes by Andrew Pixley and an introduction by show runner Russell T Davies.
  21. In Their Own Words – Volume 5 1987–1996 (November 2008, 100 pages): A chronological commentary on the making of the TV series in the latter part of the 1980s, the events following the initial cancellation in 1989, and the making of the TV Movie in 1996. This is collated from extracts of interviews previously published in Doctor Who Magazine with the individuals concerned.
  22. 200 Golden Moments (May 2009, 148 pages): To mark 200 television stories with the broadcast of "Planet of the Dead", at least one 'golden moment' was chosen from each story, with an essay to celebrate the chosen scene.
  23. Sarah Jane Smith (October 2009, 100 pages): A guide to the production of The Sarah Jane Adventures, covering holiday special "Invasion of the Bane", the first and second series, and the Comic Relief special. This included a detailed look at the production of each of the episodes by Andrew Pixley and an interview with Elisabeth Sladen who played Sarah Jane.
  24. In Their Own Words – Volume 6 1997–2009 (February 2010, 116 pages): A chronological commentary on the events following the TV Movie in the late 1990s and early 2000s, and the making of the revived series from 2005 to 2009. This is collated from extracts of interviews previously published in Doctor Who Magazine with the individuals concerned.
  25. The Doctor Who Companion – The Specials (April 2010, 100 pages): A guide to the production of the recently aired 2008–2010 specials starring David Tennant. This included a detailed look at the production of each of the episodes by Andrew Pixley.
  26. The Doctor Who Companion – The Eleventh Doctor Volume One (October 2010, 100 pages): A guide to the production of the first half of the recently aired 2010 series, from "The Eleventh Hour" to "The Vampires of Venice". This included a detailed look at the production of each of the episodes by Andrew Pixley.
  27. The Doctor Who Companion – The Eleventh Doctor Volume Two (December 2010, 100 pages): A guide to the production of the second half of the recently aired 2010 series, from "Amy's Choice" to "The Big Bang", plus DVD extras "Meanwhile in the TARDIS". This included a detailed look at the production of each of the episodes by Andrew Pixley.
  28. Sarah Jane Smith – Volume Two (April 2011, 116 pages): A guide to the production of The Sarah Jane Adventures, covering the third and fourth series. This included a detailed look at the production of each of the episodes by Andrew Pixley.
  29. The Doctor Who Companion – The Eleventh Doctor Volume Three (September 2011, 84 pages): A guide to the production of the next five Eleventh Doctor episodes, from "A Christmas Carol" to "The Doctor's Wife". This included a detailed look at the production of each of the episodes by Andrew Pixley.
  30. The Doctor Who Companion – The Eleventh Doctor Volume Four: A guide to the production of the next five Eleventh Doctor episodes, from "The Rebel Flesh" to "The Girl Who Waited". This included a detailed look at the production of each of the episodes by Andrew Pixley.
  31. The Doctor Who Companion – The Eleventh Doctor Volume Five: A guide to the production of the next five Eleventh Doctor episodes, from "The God Complex" to the 2011 Christmas special. This included a detailed look at the production of each of the episodes by Andrew Pixley.

Comic Strip: Collected editions

Panini has been collecting the comic sections of the magazines into a number of trade paperbacks.

Due to its comparatively short run, the Ninth Doctor comic strips collection was published as a magazine format Special Edition (issue 13, above).

The available collections are:

Fourth Doctor:

  • The Iron Legion (164 pages, 2004, ISBN 1-904159-37-0)
  • Written by Pat Mills/John Wagner (1–16 and 19–34) and Steve Moore (35–38), with art by Dave Gibbons (1–16 and 19–38)
    • "The Iron Legion" (issue 1–8)
    • "City of the Damned" (issue 9–16)
    • "The Star Beast" (issue 19–26)
    • "Dogs of Doom" (issue 27–34)
    • "The Time Witch" (issue 35–38)
    • Bonus feature: Interview with Dave Gibbons, originally printed in Doctor Who Classic Comics issue 11
  • Dragon's Claw (164 pages, 2005, ISBN 1-904159-81-8)
  • Written by Steve Moore (39–52) and Steve Parkhouse (53–60), with art by Dave Gibbons (39–57 and 60) and Mike McMahon/Adolfo Buylla (58–59)
    • "Dragon’s Claw" (issue 39–45)
    • "The Collector" (issue 46)
    • "Dreamers of Death" (issue 47–48)
    • "The Life Bringer!" (issue 49–50)
    • "The War of Words" (issue 51)
    • "Spider-God" (issue 52)
    • "The Deal" (issue 53)
    • "End of the Line" (issue 54–55)
    • "The Freefall Warriors" (issue 56–57)
    • "Junkyard Demon" (issue 58–59)
    • "The Neutron Knights" (issue 60)

Fifth Doctor:

  • The Tides of Time (212 pages, 2005, ISBN 1-904159-92-3)
  • Written by Dez Skinn (17–18) and Steve Parkhouse (61–84 and 86–87), with art by Paul Neary (17–18), Dave Gibbons (61–69), Mick Austin (70–83) and Steve Dillon (84 and 86–87)
    • "The Tides of Time" (issue 61–67)
    • "Stars Fell on Stockbridge" (issue 68–69)
    • "The Stockbridge Horror" (issue 70–75)
    • "Lunar Lagoon" (issue 76–77)
    • "4-Dimensional Vistas" (issue 78–83)
    • "The Moderator" (issue 84 and 86–87)
    • Bonus feature: "Timeslip" (issue 17–18) This story actually features the Fourth Doctor but was included to complete the run from Doctor Who Weekly.

Sixth Doctor:

  • Voyager (172 pages, 2007, ISBN 978-1-905239-71-9)
  • Written by Steve Parkhouse (88–99) and Alan McKenzie (101–107), with art by John Ridgway (88–107)
    • "The Shape Shifter" (issue 88–89)
    • "Voyager" (issue 90–94)
    • "Polly The Glot" (issue 95–97)
    • "Once Upon a Time-Lord" (issue 98–99)
    • "War-Game" (issue 100–101)
    • "Funhouse" (issue 102–103)
    • "Kane's Story" (issue 104)
    • "Abel's Story" (issue 105)
    • "The Warrior's Story" (issue 106)
    • "Frobisher's Story" (issue 107)
    • Bonus feature: Interview with John Ridgway, reprinted from Doctor Who Classic Comics issue 16
  • The World Shapers (188 pages, May 2008, ISBN 978-1-905239-87-0)
  • Written by Alan McKenzie/John Ridgway (108–110), Simon Furman (111–113, 117), Jamie Delano (114–116, 123–126), Grant Morrison (118–119, 127–129) and Mike Collins (120–122), with art by John Ridgway (108–129) and Tim Perkins (inks, 120–129)
    • "Exodus! / Revelation! / Genesis!" (issue 108–110)
    • "Nature of the Beast!" (issue 111–113)
    • "Time Bomb" (issue 114–116)
    • "Salad Daze" (issue 117)
    • "Changes" (issue 118–119)
    • "Profits of Doom!" (issue 120–122)
    • "The Gift" (issue 123–126)
    • "The World Shapers" (issue 127–129)
    • Bonus feature: Interview with Frobisher, reprinted from Doctor Who Magazine issue 148

Seventh Doctor:

  • A Cold Day in Hell (180 pages, May 2009, ISBN 978-1-84653-410-2)
  • Written by Simon Furman (130–135, 140), Mike Collins (136–138), Grant Morrison (139), John Freeman (141–142), Dan Abnett (143–144), Richard Alan/John Carnell (145–146), John Carnell (147) and Alan Grant (148–150), with art by John Ridgway/Tim Perkins (130–133), Kev Hopgood/Tim Perkins (134), Kev Hopgood/Dave Hine (136–138), Bryan Hitch (139), John Higgins (140), Lee Sullivan (141–142), John Ridgway (143–144), Dougie Braithwaite/Dave Elliott (145–146), Andy Lanning/Kev Hopgood (147) and Martin Griffiths/Cam Smith (148–150)
    • "A Cold Day in Hell!" (issue 130–133)
    • "Redemption!" (issue 134)
    • "The Crossroads of Time" (issue 135)
    • "Claws of the Klathi!" (issue 136–138)
    • "Culture Shock!" (issue 139)
    • "Keepsake" (issue 140)
    • "Planet of the Dead" (issue 141–142)
    • "Echoes of the Mogor!" (issue 143–144)
    • "Time and Tide" (issue 145–146)
    • "Follow that TARDIS!" (issue 147)
    • "Invaders from Gantac!" (issue 148–150)
    • Bonus feature: Introduction by Richard Starkings, the comic strip's editor at the time
    • Bonus feature: Commentary on all of the included strips by writers, artists and editors involved, with overview by John Freeman

Eighth Doctor:

  • End Game (212 pages, ISBN 1-905239-09-2)
  • Written by Alan Barnes (244–255 and 257–265) and Scott Gray (256 and 266–271), with pencils by Martin Geraghty (244–249 and 251–255 and 266–271) and inks by Robin Smith/Robin Riggs (244–249 and 251–255 and 266–271), with art by Sean Longcroft (250) and Adrian Salmon (256)
    • "End Game" (issue 244–247)
    • "The Keep" (issue 248–249)
    • "Fire and Brimstone" (issue 251–255)
    • "Tooth and Claw" (issue 257–260)
    • "The Final Chapter" (issue 262–265)
    • "Wormwood" (issue 266–271)
    • "A Life of Matter & Death" (issue 250)
    • "By Hook or By Crook" (issue 256)
    • Bonus feature: "The Threshold" by Scott Gray – an introduction to The Threshold and a recap of events in the Seventh Doctor strip "Ground Zero"
    • Bonus feature: Commentary by Alan Barnes and Scott Gray on all featured stories with character designs and early drafts of artwork.
  • The Glorious Dead (244 pages, 2006, ISBN 1-905239-44-0)
  • Written by Scott Gray (273–276 and 284–299), Adrian Salmon (277), Alan Barnes (278–283), Steve Moore (5–7 and 23–24), with pencils by Martin Geraghty (273–276 and 278–282 and 287–296) and inks by Robin Smith (273–276 and 278–282 and 287–296) and Fareed Choudhury (278–286), with art by Adrian Salmon (277 and 284–286), Roger Langridge (283 and 287–299), Steve Dillon (5–7 and 23–24)
    • "The Fallen" (issue 273–276)
    • "Unnatural Born Killers" (issue 277)
    • "The Road to Hell" (issue 278–282)
    • "TV Action!" (issue 283)
    • "The Company of Thieves" (issue 284–286)
    • "The Glorious Dead" (issue 287–296)
    • "The Autonomy Bug" (issue 297–299)
    • "Happy Deathday" (issue 272)
    • Bonus feature: Commentary on all the featured Eighth Doctor strips by Scott Gray and Alan Barnes along with designs and early drafts of artwork
    • Bonus feature: "Throwback: The Soul of a Cyberman" (issue 5–7) A Doctor-less story featuring the first appearance of Kroton the Cyberman
    • Bonus feature: "Ship of Fools" (issue 23–24) A Doctor-less story featuring Kroton the Cyberman.
  • Oblivion (228 pages, 2006, ISBN 1-905239-45-9)
  • Written by Scott Gray (300–304, 306, 308–310, 312–328), with pencils by Martin Geraghty (300–304, 306, 308–310 and 323–328), and inks by Robin Smith (300–304, 306 and 308–310) and David A. Roach (323–328), with art by Lee Sullivan (312–317), John Ross (318–222) and Adrian Salmon (311)
    • "Ophidius" (issue 300–303)
    • "Beautiful Freak" (issue 304)
    • "The Way of All Flesh" (issue 306 and 308–310)
    • "Children of the Revolution" (issue 312–317)
    • "Me and My Shadow" (issue 318)
    • "Uroborus" (issue 319–322)
    • "Oblivion" (issue 323–328)
    • "Character Assassin" (issue 311)
    • Bonus Feature: Commentary on all included stories by Scott Gray with character designs and early drafts of artwork.
  • The Flood (228 pages, 2007, ISBN 978-1-905239-65-8)
  • Written by Scott Gray (329, 333–353) and Gareth Roberts (330–332), with pencils / art by Roger Langridge (329), Mike Collins (330–332), Adrian Salmon (333), Anthony Williams (334–336), Martin Geraghty (337 and 346–353) and John Ross (343–345)
    • "Where Nobody Knows Your Name" (issue 329)
    • "The Nightmare Game" (issue 330–332)
    • "The Power of Thoueris!" (issue 333)
    • "The Curious Tale of Spring-Heeled Jack" (issue 334–336)
    • "The Land of Happy Endings" (issue 337)
    • "Bad Blood" (issue 338–342)
    • "Sins of the Fathers" (issue 343–345)
    • "The Flood" (issue 346–353)
    • Bonus feature – Commentary on all featured stories by their authors plus early designs and drawings for each.
    • Bonus feature – "Flood Barriers" by Clayton Hickman: A description of the difficulties of changing from the Eighth to the Ninth Doctor with the script for an alternative version of the final part of The Flood.

Tenth Doctor:

  • The Betrothal of Sontar (180 pages, 2008, ISBN 978-1-905239-90-0)
  • Written by John Tomlinson/Nick Abadzis (365–367), Gareth Roberts (368), Tony Lee (369–371), Mike Collins (372–374), Jonathan Morris (375–376, Doctor Who Storybook 2007), Nev Fountain (377) and Alan Barnes (378–380), with pencils by Mike Collins (365–376) and Martin Geraghty (Doctor Who Storybook 2007, 378–380), and inks by David A. Roach (365–376, Doctor Who Storybook 2007, 378–380), art by Roger Langridge (377)
    • "The Betrothal of Sontar" (issue 365–367)
    • "The Lodger" (issue 368)
    • "F.A.Q." (issue 369–371)
    • "The Futurists" (issue 372–374)
    • "Interstellar Overdrive" (issue 375–376)
    • "Opera of Doom!" (Doctor Who Storybook 2007)
    • "The Green-Eyed Monster" (issue 377)
    • "The Warkeeper's Crown" (issue 378–380)
    • Bonus feature – Commentary on all featured stories by their authors plus early designs and drawings for each.
  • The Widow's Curse (220 pages, 2009, ISBN 978-1-84653-429-4)
  • Written by Rob Davis (381–385, 395–398), Dan McDaid (386–389), Jonathan Morris (390, Doctor Who Storybook 2008, Doctor Who Storybook 2009, 399), and Ian Edginton (391–393), with pencils by Mike Collins (381–384), John Ross (385), Martin Geraghty (386–389, Doctor Who Storybook 2008), and inks by David A. Roach (381–389, 391–393, 394–398, Doctor Who Storybook 2008), with art by Roger Langridge (390) and Rob Davis (Doctor Who Storybook 2009, 399)
    • "The Woman Who Sold the World" (issue 381–384)
    • "Bus Stop!" (issue 385)
    • "The First" (issue 386–389)
    • "Sun Screen" (Doctor Who Storybook 2008)
    • "Death to the Doctor!" (issue 390)
    • "Universal Monsters" (issue 391–393)
    • "The Widow's Curse" (issue 395–398)
    • "The Immortal Emperor" (Doctor Who Storybook 2009)
    • "The Time of My Life" (issue 399)
    • Bonus feature – Commentary on all featured stories by writers, artists and editors involved, plus early designs and drawings for each.

Doctor Who Classics

In January 2008, IDW Publishing, an American comic book company, launched Doctor Who Classics, a monthly comic book series reprinting digitally colourised Fourth, Fifth, Sixth and Seventh Doctor strips from the early issues of DWM.[3] The series is being collected in trade paperbacks:

  • Volume 1 (112 pages, July 2008, ISBN 978-1-60010-189-2)
    • "The Iron Legion" (issue 1–8)
    • "City of the Damned" (issue 9–16)
    • "Timeslip" (issue 17–18)
    • "The Star Beast" (issue 19–26)
  • Volume 2 (120 pages, December 2008, ISBN 978-1-60010-289-9)
    • "The Star Beast" (issue 26 only)
    • "The Dogs of Doom" (issue 27–34)
    • "The Time Witch" (issue 35–38)
    • "Dragon’s Claw" (issue 39–45)
    • "The Collector" (issue 46)
    • "Dreamers of Death" (issue 47–48)
  • Volume 3 (128 pages, May 2009, ISBN 978-1-60010-425-1)
    • "Changes" (issue 118–119)
    • "Culture Shock!" (issue 139)
    • "The World Shapers" (issue 127–129)
    • "The Life Bringer" (issue 49–50)
    • "War of the Worlds" (issue 51)
    • "The Spider-God" (issue 52)
    • "The Deal" (issue 53)
    • "End of the Line" (issue 54–55)
    • "The Freefall Warriors" (issue 56–57)
  • Volume 4 (152 pages, November 2009, ISBN 978-1-60010-534-0)
    • "Junk-Yard Demon" (issue 58–59)
    • "The Neutron Knights" (issue 60)
    • "The Tides of Time" (issue 61–67)
    • "Stars Fell on Stockbridge" (issue 68–69)
    • "The Stockbridge Horror" (issue 70–75)
  • Volume 5 (104 pages, March 2010, ISBN 978-1-60010-608-8)
    • "Lunar Lagoon" (issue 76–77)
    • "4-Dimensional Vistas" (issue 78–83)
    • "The Moderator" (issue 84, 86–87)
    • "Skywatch-7" (issue 58)
  • Volume 6 (148 pages, December 2010, ISBN 978-1-60010-793-1)
    • "The Shape Shifter" (issue 88–89)
    • "Voyager, Parts 1–5" (issue 90–94)
    • "Polly The Glot" (issue 95–97)
    • "Once Upon A Time Lord" (issue 98–99)
    • "War-Game, Parts 1 & 2" (issue 100–101)
    • "Fun House" (issue 102–103)
    • "Kane's Story" (issue 104)
    • "Abel's Story" (issue 105)
    • "The Warriors Story" (issue 106)
    • "Frobisher Story" (issue 107)
  • Volume 7 (September 2011)
    • "A Cold Day In Hell" (issue 130-133)
    • "Redemption" (issue 134)
    • "The Crossroads Of Time" (issue 135)
    • "Claws Of The Klathi" (issue 136-138)
    • "Keepsake" (issue 140)
    • "Planet Of The Dead" (issue 141-142)
    • "Culture Shock" (issue 139)
    • "Echoes of Morgor!" (issue 143-44)

Other reprints

The DWM comic strip has also been reprinted in other formats:

  • From October 1984 to August 1986, Marvel Comics published a monthly comic book series in America that reprinted the Fourth Doctor strips and some of the Fifth Doctor strips. For the purposes of the comic book, the strips were colourised.
  • In 1985, Marvel published a graphic novel entitled Doctor Who: Voyager which reprinted the Sixth Doctor strips that originally appeared in DWM 88 to 99, again colourised. As with the comic book, the graphic novel was compiled for American readers.
  • Between 1992 and 1994, Marvel UK published Doctor Who Classic Comics, which reprinted Fourth and Fifth Doctor strips from DWM, as well as strips featuring earlier Doctors from comics such as TV Action. Doctor Who Classic Comics ran for 27 issues, plus a 1993 Autumn Special which reprinted and completed the unfinished Seventh Doctor story "Evening's Empire" from DWM 180. The stories in Doctor Who Classic Comics were colourised.
  • In 1993, Virgin Publishing published a graphic novel entitled Doctor Who: Mark of Mandragora which reprinted the Seventh Doctor stories that originally appeared in DWM 159–162 and 164–172, as well as the text story "Teenage Kicks" by Paul Cornell originally published in DWM 163. The strips were colourised.

See also

References

  1. ^ John, Andrew (2 April 2010). "Guinness World Record for Doctor Who Magazine". DigitalJournal.com. http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/289974. Retrieved 3 April 2010. 
  2. ^ The Flood – ISBN 978-1-905239-65-8 Pg 221–223
  3. ^ IDW Launches Dr. Who Classics in December (press release) Newsarama, 3 November 2007

External links


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