Matsu class destroyer


Matsu class destroyer
Momi
Momi, one of the members of this class
Class overview
Name: Matsu class and Tachibana class
Builders: Maizuru Naval Arsenal,
Yokosuka Naval Arsenal,
Fujinagata Shipbuilding Yard,
Kōbe-Kawasaki Shipbuilding Yard
Operators: Naval Ensign of Japan.svg Imperial Japanese Navy
Flag of the Republic of China.svg Republic of China Navy
Royal Navy Ensign Royal Navy
Soviet Navy Ensign Soviet Navy
US flag 48 stars.svg United States Navy
Naval Ensign of Japan.svg Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force
Preceded by: Ōtori class torpedo boat
Yūgumo class destroyer
Built: 1943–1945
In commission: 1944–1971
Planned: 42 (1943, Ship #5481-5522),
32 (1944, Ship #4801-4832),
80 (1945, Kai-Tachinaba class)
Completed: 18 (Matsu class),
14 (Tachibana class)
Cancelled: 122
Lost: 10
Retired: 22 + 1 (JDS Wakaba)
General characteristics Matsu class
Displacement: 1,260 tons standard
1,530 tons in battle condition
Length: 100.0 m (328 ft 1 in) overall,
92.15 m (302 ft 4 in) waterline
Beam: 9.35 m (30 ft 8 in)
Draft: 3.30 m (10 ft 10 in)
Propulsion: 2 × Kampon water tube boilers,
2 × Kampon impulse geared[1] turbines, 19,000 shp (14 MW)
2 shafts
Speed: 27.8 knots (32.0 mph; 51.5 km/h)
Range: 3,500 nmi (6,500 km) at 18 kn (21 mph; 33 km/h)
Complement: 211
Sensors and
processing systems:
1 × Type 93 active sonar,
1 × Type 93 hydrophone
Electronic warfare
and decoys:
1 × 22-Gō surface search radar (wavelength 10 cm)
Armament:

(Matsu, April 1944)
3 × 127 mm (5.0 in) L/40 Type 89 AA guns (1×2, 1×1)[2]
24 × 25 mm (1") Type 96 AA guns (4×3, 12×1)[2]
4 × 610 mm (24 in) Type 92 torpedo tubes (1×4)
4 × [2] Type 93 torpedoes
4 depth charge throwers[2]
36 × Type 2 depth charges[3]

(Take, March 1945)
3 × 127 mm (5.0 in) L/40 Type 89 AA guns (1×2, 1×1)
39 × 25 mm (1") Type 96 AA guns (4×3, 27×1)
4 × 610 mm (24 in) Type 92 torpedo tubes (1×4)
4 × Type 93 torpedoes
4 depth charge throwers
48 × Type 2 depth charges
General characteristics Tachibana class
Displacement: 1,350 tons standard
1,640 tons in battle condition
Length: 100.0 m (328 ft 1 in) overall,
92.15 m (302 ft 4 in) waterline
Beam: 9.35 m (30 ft 8 in)
Draft: 3.41 m (11 ft 2 in)
Propulsion: 2 × Kampon water tube boilers,
2 × Kanpon impulse geared[2] turbines, 19,000 shp (14 MW)
2 shafts
Speed: 27.3 knots (31.4 mph; 50.6 km/h)
Sensors and
processing systems:
1 × Type 3 active sonar,
1 × Type 4 hydrophone
Electronic warfare
and decoys:
1 × 22- surface search radar (wavelength 10 cm),
1 × 13- early warning radar (wavelength 2 m)
Armament: (Tachibana, January 1945)
3 × 127 mm (5.0 in) L/40 Type 89 AA guns (1×2, 1×1)
25 × 25 mm (1") AA guns (4×3, 13×1)
4 × 610 mm (24 in) Type 92 torpedo tubes (1×4)
4 × Type 93 torpedoes
48 × Type 2 depth charges
General characteristics Kaiten carrier[4]
Armament: (Take, 25 June 1945)
3 × 127 mm (5.0 in) L/40 Type 89 AA guns (1×2, 1×1)
39 × 25 mm (1") AA guns (4×3, 27×1)
4 × 610 mm (24 in) Type 92 torpedo tubes (1×4)
4 × Type 93 torpedoes
48-60 × Type 2 depth charges
1 × manned torpedo Kaiten Type 1

The Matsu class destroyer (松型駆逐艦 Matsu-gata kuchikukan?) were a class of destroyer built for the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN), who referred to them as Type-D Destroyer (丁型駆逐艦 Tei-gata kuchikukan?).

Contents

Design basis

The Matsu class were built late in World War II, and they were intended to be more cost-effective in response to the changing character of naval warfare at that time. These ships were lighter and smaller than previous Japanese destroyers, with different armament such as enhanced anti-aircraft guns and anti-submarine weapons, and radar. Since surface warfare was believed to be less likely at this stage of the war, armament such as torpedo tubes that would be useful against surface ships was reduced.

As in other navies during the war, the IJN substantially simplified the design to speed up construction, and used Ōtori class machinery, because high speed was unnecessary for convoy escort operations. However, mass production was not achieved.

The Matsu class design was subsequently further simplified, resulting in theTachibana class destroyer (橘型駆逐艦 Tachibakna-gata kuchikukan?) or Modified Type-D Destroyer (改丁型駆逐艦 Kai Tei-gata kuchikukan?). The Tachibana class destroyers adopted the first modular design in a Japanese destroyer. Matsu class destroyers whose construction was started late in the programme were completed as Tachibana class.

The IJN converted twelve destroyers to Kaiten mother ships to prepare for the Japanese mainland decisive battle.

Matsu and Tachibana classes compared

Matsu-class DD Take with kaiten. Lower illust is Take at Aug.1945.
Tachibana. Arrows are differnce to Matsu-Class.
Matsu class Tachibana class
Project number F55 F55B
Building method Ordinary Modular design
Main materials High-Tensile Strength steel (upper deck only) and Carbon steel Carbon steel only
Hull Double bottom Single bottom
Bow Knuckle bow Straight bow
Stern Destroyer stern Transom stern
Bilge Keel Boxy (Solid) Flat board
Active sonar Type 93 Type 3
Hydrophone Type 93 Type 4
Turbines high-pressure,
intermediate-pressure,
low-pressure,
and cruising
high-pressure
and low-pressure

Ships of the classes

Ship # Japanese name & translation Class Builder Laid down Launched Completed Fate
5481 Matsu (?)
Pine tree
Matsu Maizuru Naval Arsenal 8 August 1943 3 February 1944 28 April 1944 Sunk 4 August 1944
5482 Bamboo Matsu Yokosuka Naval Arsenal 15 October 1943 28 March 1944 16 June 1944 Surrendered to United Kingdom on 16 July 1947 at Singapore, scrapped
5483 Japanese apricot Matsu Fujinagata Shipbuilding Yard 25 January 1944 24 April 1944 28 June 1944 Sunk 31 January 1945
5484 Momo (?)
Peach
Matsu Maizuru Naval Arsenal 5 November 1943 25 March 1944 10 June 1944 Sunk 15 December 1944
5485 Mulberry Matsu Fujinagata Shipbuilding Yard 20 December 1943 25 May 1944 15 July 1944 Sunk 3 December 1944
5486 Paulownia Matsu Yokosuka Naval Arsenal 1 February 1944 27 May 1944 14 August 1944 Delivered to Soviet Union on 29 July 1947 at Nakhodka, renamed Vozrozhdionny (Возрождённый), converted to target ship TSL-25 (1949) and depot ship PM-65 (1957), scrapped in 1969.
5487 Cedar Matsu Fujinagata Shipbuilding Yard 25 February 1944 3 July 1944 25 August 1944 Surrendered to Republic of China on 6 July 1947 at Shanghai, renamed Huiyang, scrapped 1951
5488 Podocarpaceae Matsu Maizuru Naval Arsenal 19 February 1944 10 June 1944 10 August 1944 Surrendered to United Kingdom on 14 August 1947 at Singapore, scrapped 1947
5489 Momi (?)
Abies firma
Matsu Yokosuka Naval Arsenal 1 February 1944 16 June 1944 3 September 1944 Sunk 5 January 1945
5490 Live oak Matsu Fujinagata Shipbuilding Yard 5 May 1944 13 August 1944 30 September 1944 Surrendered to United States on 7 August 1947 at Sasebo, scrapped 20 March 1948
5491 Yaezakura (八重櫻?)
Prunus verecunda Antiqua
Tachibana Yokosuka Naval Arsenal 18 December 1944 17 March 1945 Discontinued on 23 June 1945 (60%). Sunk 18 July 1945
5492 Kaya (?)
Torreya nucifera
Matsu Maizuru Naval Arsenal 10 April 1944 30 July 1944 30 September 1944 Delivered to Soviet Union on 5 July 1947 at Nakhodka, renamed Volevoy (Волевой), converted to target ship TSL-23 (1949), scrapped in 1959.
5493 Oak Matsu Fujinagata Shipbuilding Yard 10 June 1944 12 October 1944 26 November 1944 Scrapped 1 July 1948
5494 Yadake (矢竹?)
Arrow bamboo
Tachibana Yokosuka Naval Arsenal 2 January 1945 1 May 1945 Construction stopped 17 April 1945. Launched to empty the dock. Converted to breakwater, 1948
5495 Kuzu (?)
Kudzu
or
Madake (真竹?)
Phyllostachys bambusoides
Tachibana Yokosuka Naval Arsenal 19 March 1945 Discontinued on 17 April 1945.
5496 Sakura (?)
Cherry blossom
Matsu Yokosuka Naval Arsenal 2 June 1944 6 September 1944 25 November 1944 Sunk 11 July 1945
5497 Willow Matsu Fujinagata Shipbuilding Yard 20 August 1944 25 November 1944 8 January 1945 Sunk 9 August 1945
5498 Camellia Matsu Maizuru Naval Arsenal 20 June 1944 30 September 1944 30 November 1944 Scrapped 28 July 1948
5499 Persimmon Tachibana Yokosuka Naval Arsenal 5 October 1944 11 December 1944 5 March 1945 Surrendered to United States on 4 July 1947 at Qingdao. Sunk as target off 35°29′N 123°35′E / 35.483°N 123.583°E / 35.483; 123.583, 19 August 1947
5500 Birch Tachibana Fujinagata Shipbuilding Yard 15 October 1944 27 February 1945 29 May 1945 Surrendered to United States on 4 August 1947 at Sasebo, scrapped 1 March 1948
5501 Hayaume (早梅?)
The Prunus mume which bloomed early
Tachibana Yokosuka Naval Arsenal Cancelled in 1945.
5502 Chamaecyparis obtusa Matsu Yokosuka Naval Arsenal 4 March 1944 4 July 1944 30 September 1944 Sunk 7 January 1945
5503 Katsura (?)
Cercidiphyllum
Tachibana Fujinagata Shipbuilding Yard 30 November 1944 23 June 1945 Construction stopped 23 June 1945. Converted to breakwater.
5504 Tobiume (飛梅?)
A sacred Prunus mume at Dazaifu Tenman-gū
Tachibana Yokosuka Naval Arsenal Cancelled in 1945.
5505 Kaede (?)
Maple
Matsu Yokosuka Naval Arsenal 4 March 1944 25 June 1944 30 October 1944 Surrendered to Republic of China on 6 July 1947 at Shanghai, renamed Hengyang, scrapped 1962
5506 Fuji (?)
Wisteria
Tachibana Yokosuka Naval Arsenal Cancelled in 1945.
5507 Wakazakura (若櫻?)
Young cherry blossom
Tachibana Fujinagata Shipbuilding Yard 15 January 1945 Discontinued on 11 May 1945, scrapped.
5508 Zelkova serrata Matsu Yokosuka Naval Arsenal 22 June 1944 30 September 1944 15 December 1944 Surrendered to United States on 5 July 1947 at Yokosuka, Sunk as target off 34°44′N 140°01′E / 34.733°N 140.017°E / 34.733; 140.017, 29 October 1947
5509 Yamazakura (山櫻?)
Cherry blossom at mountain
Tachibana Fujinagata Shipbuilding Yard Cancelled in 1945.
5510 Ashi (?)
Phragmites
Tachibana Yokosuka Naval Arsenal Cancelled on 26 March 1945.
5511 Tachibana (?)
Citrus tachibana
Tachibana Yokosuka Naval Arsenal 8 July 1944 14 October 1944 20 January 1945 Sunk 14 July 1945
5512 Shinodake (篠竹?)
Simon bamboo
Tachibana Fujinagata Shipbuilding Yard Cancelled in 1945.
5513 Yomogi (?)
Artemisia vulgaris
Tachibana Yokosuka Naval Arsenal Cancelled in 1945.
5514 Parthenocissus tricuspidata Tachibana Yokosuka Naval Arsenal 31 July 1944 2 November 1944 8 February 1945 Surrendered to Republic of China on 31 July 1947 at Shanghai, renamed Huayang.
5515 Aoi (?)
Malvaceae
Tachibana Yokosuka Naval Arsenal Cancelled in 1945.
5516 Shiraume (白梅?)
White petal of Prunus mume
Tachibana Fujinagata Shipbuilding Yard Cancelled in 1945.
5517 Lespedeza Tachibana Yokosuka Naval Arsenal 11 September 1944 27 November 1944 1 March 1945 Surrendered to United Kingdom on 16 July 1947 at Singapore, scrapped
5518 Kiku (?)
Chrysanthemum
Tachibana Fujinagata Shipbuilding Yard Cancelled in 1945.
5519 Kashiwa (?)
Daimyo oak
Tachibana Yokosuka Naval Arsenal Cancelled in 1945.
5520 Viola Tachibana Yokosuka Naval Arsenal 21 October 1944 27 December 1944 26 March 1945 Surrendered to United Kingdom on 23 August 1947 at Hong Kong, sunk as target 1947
5521 Cinnamomum camphora Tachibana Yokosuka Naval Arsenal 9 November 1944 8 January 1945 28 April 1945 Surrendered to United Kingdom on 1947
5522 Soviet Union on 29 July 1947 at Nakhodka, renamed Vetrenny and soon Vyrazitel'ny (Выразительный), converted to target ship TSL-26 (1949), scrapped in 1958.
4801 Kigiku (黄菊?)
Yellow chrysanthemum
Tachibana Cancelled in March 1945.
4802 Hatsugiku (初菊?)
Year's first chrysanthemum
Tachibana Cancelled in March 1945.
4803 Akane (?)
Madder
Tachibana Cancelled in March 1945.
4804 Shiragiku (白菊?)
White Chrysanthemum
Tachibana Cancelled in March 1945.
4805 Chigusa (千草?)
Grass
Tachibana Cancelled in March 1945.
4806 Wakakusa (若草?)
Spring grass
Tachibana Cancelled in March 1945.
4807 Natsugusa (夏草?)
Summer grass
Tachibana Cancelled in March 1945.
4808 Akikusa (秋草?)
Autumn grass
Tachibana Cancelled in March 1945.
4809 Elm Tachibana Maizuru Naval Arsenal 14 August 1944 25 November 1944 31 January 1945 Scrapped April 1948
4810 Nashi (?)
Pyrus pyrifolia
Tachibana Kōbe-Kawasaki Shipbuilding Yard 1 September 1944 17 January 1945 15 March 1945 Sunk 26 July 1945. Salvaged on 30 September 1954, Transferred to JDS Wakaba on 31 May 1956.
4811 Castanopsis Tachibana Maizuru Naval Arsenal 18 September 1944 13 January 1945 13 March 1945 Delivered to Soviet Union on 5 July 1947 at Nakhodka, renamed Vol'ny (Вольный), converted to target ship TSL-24 (1949), scrapped in 1960.
4812 Japanese Hackberry Tachibana Maizuru Naval Arsenal 14 October 1944 27 January 1945 31 March 1945 Sunk 26 June 1945, scrapped 1948
4813 Azusa (?)
Catalpa
Tachibana Yokosuka Naval Arsenal 29 December 1944 Discontinued on 17 April 1945.
4814 Qingdao. Sunk as target off 35°29′N 122°52′E / 35.483°N 122.867°E / 35.483; 122.867, 17 September 1947
4815 Hatsuume (初梅?)
Year's first Prunus mume
Tachibana Maizuru Naval Arsenal 8 December 1944 25 April 1945 18 June 1945 Surrendered to Republic of China on 6 July 1947 at Shanghai, renamed Hsinyang, scrapped 1961
4816 Tochi (?)
Aesculus
Tachibana Maizuru Naval Arsenal 23 January 1945 (28 May 1945) Discontinued on 18 May 1945. Converted to breakwater.
4817 Hishi (?)
Water caltrop
Tachibana Maizuru Naval Arsenal 10 February 1945 Discontinued on 17 April 1945.
4818 Susuki (?)
Miscanthus sinensis
Tachibana Cancelled in March 1945.
4819 Nogiku (野菊?)
Aster
Tachibana Cancelled in March 1945.
4820 Sakaki (?)
Sakaki
Tachibana Yokosuka Naval Arsenal 29 December 1944 Discontinued on 17 April 1945.
4821
to
4832
12 destroyers Tachibana Cancelled in March 1945.
80 destroyers Kai-Tachibana Cancelled on 30 June 1945.

See also

Media related to Matsu class destroyers at Wikimedia Commons

Notes

  1. ^ Fitzsimons, Bernard, general editor. Illustrated Encyclopedia of 20th Century Weapons and Warfare (London: Phoebus, 1978), Volume 17, p.1853, "Matsu".
  2. ^ a b c d e Fitzsimons, Volume 17, p.1853, "Matsu".
  3. ^ Microform by "The National Institute for Defense Studies http://www.nids.go.jp/". http://www.nids.go.jp/. .
  4. ^ Converted to the Take, Kiri, Sugi, Maki, Kashi, Kaya, Kaede, Tsuta, Hagi, Nire, Nashi and Sii, from May to July 1945.

Books

  • "Rekishi Gunzō". http://rekigun.net/. , History of Pacific War Vol.43 Matsu class destroyers, Gakken (Japan), November 2003, ISBN 4-05-603251-3
  • "Rekishi Gunzō". http://rekigun.net/. , History of Pacific War Vol.51 The truth of Imperial Japanese Vessels Histories 2, Gakken (Japan), August 2005, ISBN 4-05-604083-4
  • Collection of writings by Sizuo Fukui Vol.5, Stories of Japanese Destroyers, Kōjinsha (Japan) 1993, ISBN 4-7698-0611-6
  • Model Art Extra No.340, Drawings of Imperial Japanese Naval Vessels Part-1, Model Art Co. Ltd. (Japan), October 1989, Book code 08734-10
  • Daiji Katagiri, Ship Name Chronicles of the Imperial Japanese Navy Combined Fleet, Kōjinsha (Japan), June 1988, ISBN 4-7698-0386-9
  • The Maru Special, Japanese Naval Vessels No.41 Japanese Destroyers I, Ushio Shobō (Japan), July 1980, Book code 68343-42
  • Fitzsimons, Bernard, general editor. Illustrated Encyclopedia of Weapons and Warfare, Volume 17, p. 1854, "Matsu". London: Phoebus Publishing, 1978.

Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Minekaze class destroyer — Minekaze at Yokosuka, 1918 Class overview Builders: Maizuru Naval Arsenal Mitsubishi Nagasaki …   Wikipedia

  • Momi class destroyer — Ashi Class overview Name: Momi class Builders: Kure Naval Arsenal, Yokos …   Wikipedia

  • Matsu — may refer to: Matsu Islands, islands of the Republic of China Matsu (goddess), a sea goddess in Chinese folk religion Matsu, a book by Osamu Dazai Matanuska Susitna Valley, an area in south central Alaska Matsu, a Japanese World War II destroyer… …   Wikipedia

  • Destroyer — For other uses, see Destroyer (disambiguation). USS Winston S.Churchill, a US Navy Arleigh Burke class destroyer. In naval terminology, a destroyer is a fast and maneuverable yet long endurance warship intended to escort larger vessels in a fleet …   Wikipedia

  • No.31 class patrol boat — No.35 in 1940 Class overview Name: No.31 class patrol boat Builders: Kure Naval Ar …   Wikipedia

  • No.1 class patrol boat (1940) — Class overview Name: No.1 class patrol boat Builders: Yokosuka Naval Arsenal …   Wikipedia

  • No.1 class landing ship — Landing ship No.4 on 22 June 1944 Class overview Name: No.1 class landing ship Builders …   Wikipedia

  • List of destroyer classes — This is a list of destroyer classes. = Argentina (Armada de la República Argentina) = * Catamarca class mdash; 4 ships (1912) * Cervantes class mdash; 2 ships (1927, spanish Churruca class) * Mendoza class mdash; 3 ships (1929) * Buenos Aires… …   Wikipedia

  • Japanese destroyer Matsu (Type D) — The ] First and final battle Matsu sailed from Tateyama as the flagship of the 2nd Convoy Escort Group, which contained all of Desron 11 and was commanded by Rear Adm. Ichimatsu Takahashi, on 29 July escorting Convoy No. 4804 to Chichi Jima. On 4 …   Wikipedia

  • Chidori class torpedo boat — Chidori after refit 1934 Class overview Name: Chidori class torpedo boat Builders …   Wikipedia