Charles Hardinge, 1st Baron Hardinge of Penshurst


Charles Hardinge, 1st Baron Hardinge of Penshurst
The Right Honourable
The Lord Hardinge of Penshurst

KG GCB GCSI GCMG GCIE GCVO ISO PC
Viceroy of India
In office
23 November 1910 – 4 April 1916
Monarch George V
Preceded by The Earl of Minto
Succeeded by The Lord Chelmsford
Personal details
Born 20 June 1858 (1858-06-20)
Died 2 August 1944 (1944-08-03)
Penshurst, Kent
Nationality United Kingdom British
Spouse(s) Winifred Selina Sturt Hardinge
Alma mater Trinity College, Cambridge

Charles Hardinge, 1st Baron Hardinge of Penshurst, KG, GCB, GCSI, GCMG, GCIE, GCVO, ISO, PC (20 June 1858 – 2 August 1944) was a British diplomat and statesman who served as Viceroy of India from 1910 to 1916.

Contents

Background and education

Hardinge was the second son of Charles Hardinge, 2nd Viscount Hardinge, and the grandson of Henry Hardinge, 1st Viscount Hardinge, a former Governor-General of India. He was educated at Harrow School[1] and Trinity College, Cambridge.[2]

Career

Hardinge entered the diplomatic service in 1880, was appointed first secretary at Tehran in 1896 and first secretary at Saint Petersburg in 1898 when he was promoted over the heads of seventeen of his seniors. After a brief stint as Assistant Under-Secretary for Foreign Affairs he became Ambassador to Russia in 1904. In 1906 he was promoted to the position of Permanent Under-Secretary at the Foreign Office, and despite his own conservatism, worked closely with Liberal Foreign Secretary Sir Edward Grey. In 1907 he declined the post of Ambassador to the United States. In 1910 Hardinge was raised to the peerage as Baron Hardinge of Penshurst, in the County of Kent, and appointed by the Asquith government as Viceroy of India.

His tenure was a memorable one, seeing the visit of King George V and the Delhi Durbar of 1911, as well as the move of the capital from Calcutta to New Delhi in 1912. Although Hardinge was the target of assassination attempts by Indian nationalists, his tenure generally saw better relations between the British administration and the nationalists, thanks to the implementation of the Morley-Minto reforms of 1909, Hardinge's own admiration for Mohandas Gandhi, and criticism of the South African government's anti-Indian immigration policies.

Hardinge's efforts paid off in 1914 during the First World War. Due to improved colonial relationships, Britain was able to deploy nearly all of the British troops in India as well as many native Indian troops to areas outside of India. In particular the British Indian Army was able to play a significant role in the Mesopotamian campaign[3]

In 1916, Hardinge returned to his former post in England as Permanent Under-Secretary at the Foreign Office, serving with Arthur Balfour. In 1920 he became ambassador to France before his retirement in 1922.

Personal life

Hardinge family members in ox-cart in Hyderabad State (1911, attending the coronation of Asaf Jah VII)

He married his cousin Winifred Selina Sturt CI on 17 Apr 1890, the 2nd daughter of Henry Gerard [Sturt], 1st Baron Alington, by his first wife Lady Augusta Bingham, 1st dau. of George Charles [Bingham], 3rd Earl of Lucan. The couple had a daughter, the Hon Diamond Hardinge and son Alexander Hardinge (1894–1960), who succeeded him as Baron Hardinge of Penshurst. Lady Hardinge died on 11 July 1914. Lord Hardinge of Penshurst died in Penshurst, Kent, on 2 August 1944, aged 86.

Lady Hardinge, Winifred Selina Sturt Hardinge (1868-1914), was the first to take initiative for starting a medical college for women in Delhi, when the capital shifted from Calcutta, she laid foundation stone of the college, on 17th March 1914, and to commemorate the visit of Queen Mary in 1911-12, it was named 'Queen Mary College & Hospital'. Lady Haridinge was actively involved in collecting funds for the institution of princely states and public, unfortunately she died in late 1914. The college was eventually inaugurated on 7 February 1916 by Viceroy Hardinge. On the suggestion of Queen Mary, the college and the hospital was named after Lady Harding, as Lady Hardinge Medical College.[4]

Styles

  • 1858-1880: Charles Hardinge
  • 1880-1895: The Honourable Charles Hardinge
  • 1895-1903: The Honourable Charles Hardinge, CB
  • 1903-29 March 1904: The Honourable Charles Hardinge, CB, CVO
  • 29 March-10 May 1904: The Honourable Sir Charles Hardinge, KCMG, CB, CVO
  • 10 May 1904-1 January 1905: The Honourable Sir Charles Hardinge, KCMG, KCVO, CB
  • 1 January-9 November 1905: The Right Honourable Sir Charles Hardinge, GCMG, KCVO, CB
  • 9 November 1905-1906: The Right Honourable Sir Charles Hardinge, GCMG, GCVO, CB
  • 1906-1910: The Right Honourable Sir Charles Hardinge, GCMG, GCVO, CB, ISO
  • 1910-1916: His Excellency The Right Honourable the Lord Hardinge of Penshurst, GCB, GCSI, GCMG, GCIE, GCVO, ISO
  • 1916-1944: The Right Honourable the Lord Hardinge of Penshurst, KG, GCB, GCSI, GCMG, GCIE, GCVO, ISO

Further reading

  • Lady Hardinge of Penshurst, C.I., vice-reine of India; A tribute to her memory, by Manhar Kuvarbā, Maharani of Panna. Printed by R.W. Simpson & co., ltd., 1916.[5]

References

  1. ^ photo at http://www.harrowphotos.com and cf http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Old_Harrovians
  2. ^ Hardinge, the Hon. Charles in Venn, J. & J. A., Alumni Cantabrigienses, Cambridge University Press, 10 vols, 1922–1958.
  3. ^ Lord Hardinge and the Mesopotamia Expedition and Inquiry, 1914-1917; Douglas Goold; The Historical Journal, Vol. 19, No. 4 (Dec., 1976), pp. 919-945
  4. ^ "A fine balance of luxury and care". Hindustan Times. July 21, 2011. http://www.hindustantimes.com/News-Feed/chunk-ht-ui-newdelhi100years-topstories/A-fine-balance-of-luxury-and-care/Article1-723880.aspx. 
  5. ^ Lady Hardinge of Penshurst Open Library.
  • Briton C. Busch, Hardinge of Penshurst: a study of the old diplomacy, Hamden, Conn.: Published for the Conference on British Studies and Indiana University at South Bend by Archon Books, 1980.
  • Lord Hardinge of Penshurst, The Reminiscences of Lord Hardinge of Penshurst (London, 1947)
  • Zara S. Steiner, The Foreign Office and Foreign Policy 1898-1914 )Cambridge, 1969)
  • Winifred Selina Sturt Hardinge and Charles

External links

Government offices
Preceded by
The Earl of Minto
Viceroy of India
1910–1916
Succeeded by
The Lord Chelmsford
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Charles Stewart Scott
British Ambassador to Russia
1904–1906
Succeeded by
Sir Arthur Nicolson
Preceded by
The Lord Sanderson
Permanent Under-Secretary for Foreign Affairs
1906–1910
Succeeded by
Sir Arthur Nicolson
Preceded by
Sir Arthur Nicolson
Permanent Under-Secretary for Foreign Affairs
1916–1920
Succeeded by
Eyre Crowe
Preceded by
The Earl of Derby
British Ambassador to France
1920–1922
Succeeded by
The Marquess of Crewe
Peerage of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
New Creation
Baron Hardinge of Penshurst
1910–1944
Succeeded by
Alexander Hardinge



Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Baron Hardinge of Penshurst — Baron Hardinge of Penshurst, in the County of Kent, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1910 for the prominent diplomat the Hon. Sir Charles Hardinge, Viceroy and Governor General of India from 1910 to 1916. He was… …   Wikipedia

  • Charles Hardinge, 2nd Viscount Hardinge — Charles Stewart Hardinge, 2nd Viscount Hardinge (2 September 1822 28 July 1894), was a British Conservative politician. Contents 1 Background 2 Political career 3 Family 4 References …   Wikipedia

  • Charles Hardinge — Lord Hardinge of Penshurst Charles Hardinge (20 juin 1858 – 2 août 1944), 1er baron Hardinge of Penshurst, fut un diplomate et homme politique britannique, vice roi des Indes de 1910 à 1916 …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Charles Cornwallis, 1st Marquess Cornwallis — Cornwallis redirects here. For other uses, see Cornwallis (disambiguation). For other people named Charles Cornwallis, see Charles Cornwallis (disambiguation). His Excellency The Most Honourable General The Marquess Cornwallis KG …   Wikipedia

  • Hardinge, Charles Hardinge, 1st Baron — ▪ viceroy of India born June 20, 1858, London, Eng. died Aug. 2, 1944, Penshurst, Kent  British diplomat and viceroy of India who improved British relations in India and was instrumental in securing India s support for Great Britain in World War… …   Universalium

  • Baron Denman — Thomas Denman, 3rd Baron Denman Baron Denman, of Dovedale in the County of Derby, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1834 for the prominent lawyer, judge and Whig politician Thomas Denman. He served as Lord Chief… …   Wikipedia

  • Baron de Saumarez — James Saumarez, 1st Baron de Saumarez Baron de Saumarez, in the Island of Guernsey, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 15 September 1831 for the prominent naval commander Admiral Sir James Saumarez, 1st Baronet. He …   Wikipedia

  • Viscount Hardinge — Viscount Hardinge, of Lahore and of Kings Newton in the County of Derby, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1846 for the soldier and Tory politician Sir Henry Hardinge. His son, the second Viscount, represented… …   Wikipedia

  • Robert Bulwer-Lytton, 2. Baron Lytton — Edward Robert Bulwer Lytton, 1. Earl of Lytton GCB GCSI GCIE PC (* 8. November 1831; † 24. November 1891) war ein britischer Diplomat und Schriftsteller. Er veröffentlichte Gedichte unter dem Künstlernamen „Owen Meredith“ …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • James Broun-Ramsay, 1st Marquess of Dalhousie — James Andrew Broun Ramsay, 1. Marquess of Dalhousie James Andrew Broun Ramsay, 1. Marquess of Dalhousie, KT, PC (* 22. April 1812; † 19. Dezember 1860) war Generalgouverneur von Britisch Indien …   Deutsch Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.