Pirs (ISS module)


Pirs (ISS module)
View of SO1 "Pirs" Docking compartment

The Pirs docking compartment is a Russian module of the International Space Station (ISS). Pirs (Russian: Пирс, meaning "pier") -- also called "Stikovochny Otsek 1" or "SO-1" (Russian: Стыковочный отсек, "docking module", or DC-1 (docking compartment) -- is one of the two Russian docking compartments originally planned for the ISS. Pirs was launched in August 2001. It provides the ISS with additional docking ports, and allows egress and ingress for spacewalks by cosmonauts using Russian Orlan space suits. When the Russian segment of the ISS was redesigned in 2001, the new design did not include the SO-2, and its construction was canceled.[1] The SO-2 module now forms the basis for the Poisk module.

Contents

Construction and design

The Russian docking compartment was manufactured by RKK Energia. The Docking Compartment is similar to the Mir Docking Module used on the Mir space station. It provides docking ports for the Soyuz-TMA and Progress-M spacecraft. It also has two airlocks to accommodate spacewalks by cosmonauts wearing Russian Orlan-M spacesuits.

Launch in 2001

Pirs arrives at the ISS in 2001

The 3,580-kilogram Pirs Docking Compartment is attached to the nadir (bottom, Earth-facing) port of the Zvezda service module. It docked to the International Space Station on September 16, 2001, and was configured during three spacewalks by the Expedition 3 crew. Two Strela cargo cranes were later added by the STS-96 and STS-101 missions, carried up on Integrated Cargo Carriers and installed during EVAs.

Pirs was launched on September 14, 2001, as ISS Assembly Mission 4R, on a Russian Soyuz-U rocket, using a modified Progress spacecraft, Progress M-SO1, as an upper stage. The Docking Compartment has two primary functions. It serves as a docking port for the docking of transport and cargo vehicles to the space station, and as an airlock for the performance of spacewalks by two station crewmembers using Russian Orlan spacesuits.

In addition, the Docking Compartment can transport fuel from the fuel tanks of a docked Progress resupply vehicle to either the Zvezda Service Module Integrated Propulsion System or the Zarya Functional Cargo Block. It can also transfer propellant from Zvezda and Zarya to the propulsion system of docked vehicles—Soyuz and Progress. The docking compartment's planned lifetime as part of the station was five years.

Future

Pirs is scheduled to be detached from the nadir (bottom) port of the Zvezda module to make room for the Russian Multipurpose Laboratory Module which is scheduled for launch in December 2011.[2] It would then be destroyed during atmospheric re-entry and become the first ISS module to be decommissioned.

Airlock specifications

  • Length: 4.91 metres (16.1 ft)
  • Diameter: 2.55 metres (8 ft 4 in)
  • Weight: 3,580 kilograms (7,900 lb)
  • Volume: 13 cubic metres (460 cu ft)

Gallery

References

External links


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Rassvet (ISS module) — Rassvet as seen from the Cupola module during STS 132 …   Wikipedia

  • Poisk (ISS module) — Poisk docking module at the Space Station. Poisk (Russian: Поиск; lit. Search), also known as the Mini Research Module 2 (MRM 2), Малый исследовательский модуль 2, or МИМ 2, is a docking module of the International Space Station. Its original… …   Wikipedia

  • Tranquility (ISS module) — Tranquility photographed just before being installed to Unity node …   Wikipedia

  • Unity (ISS module) — ISS Unity connecting module (NASA) The Unity connecting module was the first U.S. built component of the International Space Station. It is cylindrical in shape, with six berthing locations (forward, aft, port, starboard, zenith, and nadir)… …   Wikipedia

  • Zvezda (ISS module) — For other uses, see Zvezda (disambiguation). ISS Zvezda The Zvezda service module of the ISS with Zarya to the right and a docked Soyuz spacecraft to the left …   Wikipedia

  • Nauka (ISS module) — Outdated drawing with Nauka docked to Zarya Nauka (Russian: Наука; lit. Science), also known as the Multipurpose Laboratory Module (MLM), (Russian: Многофункциональный лабораторный модуль, or МЛМ), will be a component of the International Space… …   Wikipedia

  • Destiny (ISS module) — The Destiny Laboratory Module (NASA) being installed on the International Space Station. See also: Scientific research on the ISS The Destiny module is the primary operating facility for U.S. research payloads aboard the International Space… …   Wikipedia

  • Harmony (ISS module) — Node 2 shown connected to Columbus, JEM, PMA 2 and Discovery. The nadir and zenith locations are open. Harmony, also known as Node 2, is the utility hub of the International Space Station. The hub contains four racks that provide electrical power …   Wikipedia

  • Columbus (ISS module) — The Columbus Module on the International Space Station …   Wikipedia

  • Cupola (ISS module) — Tracy Caldwell Dyson in the Cupola module of the International Space Station observing the Earth below …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.