List of nearest stars
Artist's conception of a red dwarf star, the most common type of star in the Sun's stellar neighborhood, and in the universe. Although termed a red dwarf, the surface temperature of this star would give it an orange hue when viewed from close proximity

This list of nearest stars contains all known stars and brown dwarfs at a distance of up to five parsecs (16.308 light-years) from the Solar System, ordered by increasing distance. In addition to the Solar System, there are another 51 stellar systems currently known lying within this distance. These systems contain a total of 61 hydrogen-fusing stars and 9 brown dwarfs. Only nine of these objects (about 13%) have an apparent magnitude less than 6.5, and are therefore observable with the naked eye.[1] Besides the Sun, only three are first-magnitude stars: Alpha Centauri, Sirius, and Procyon. All of these objects are located in the Local Bubble, a region within the Orion-Cygnus Arm of the Milky Way Galaxy.

Contents

List

Stars visible to the unaided eye have their magnitude shown in light blue below. The classes of the stars and brown dwarfs are shown in the color of their spectral types. These colors are derived from conventional names for the spectral types and do not represent the star's observed color. Some of the parallax and distance results are preliminary measurements.[2]

# Designation Stellar class Apparent magnitude (mV) Absolute magnitude (MV) Epoch J2000.0 Parallax[2][3]
Arcseconds(±err)
Distance[4]
Light-years (±err)
Additional
references
System Star Star # Right ascension[2] Declination[2]
Solar System Sun G2V[2] −26.74[2] 4.85[2] variable: the Sun travels along the ecliptic 180° 0.000015 has eight planets
1 Alpha Centauri
(Rigil Kentaurus; Toliman)
Proxima Centauri (V645 Centauri) 1 M5.5Ve 11.09[2] 15.53[2] 14h 29m 43.0s −62° 40′ 46″ 0.768 87(0 29)″[5][6] 4.2421(16) [7]
α Centauri A (HD 128620) 2 G2V[2] 0.01[2] 4.38[2] 14h 39m 36.5s −60° 50′ 02″ 0.747 23(1 17)″[5][8] 4.3650(68)
α Centauri B (HD 128621) 2 K1V[2] 1.34[2] 5.71[2] 14h 39m 35.1s −60° 50′ 14″
2 Barnard's Star (BD+04°3561a) 4 M4.0Ve 9.53[2] 13.22[2] 17h 57m 48.5s +04° 41′ 36″ 0.546 98(1 00)″[5][6] 5.9630(109)
3 Wolf 359 (CN Leonis) 5 M6.0V[2] 13.44[2] 16.55[2] 10h 56m 29.2s +07° 00′ 53″ 0.419 10(2 10)″[5] 7.7825(390)
4 Lalande 21185 (BD+36°2147) 6 M2.0V[2] 7.47[2] 10.44[2] 11h 03m 20.2s +35° 58′ 12″ 0.393 42(0 70)″[5][6] 8.2905(148)
5 Sirius
(α Canis Majoris)
Sirius A 7 A1V[2] −1.46[2] 1.42[2] 06h 45m 08.9s −16° 42′ 58″ 0.380 02(1 28)″[5][6] 8.5828(289)
Sirius B 7 DA2[2] 8.44[2] 11.34[2]
6 Luyten 726-8 Luyten 726-8 A (BL Ceti) 9 M5.5Ve 12.54[2] 15.40[2] 01h 39m 01.3s −17° 57′ 01″ 0.373 70(2 70)″[5] 8.7280(631)
Luyten 726-8 B (UV Ceti) 10 M6.0Ve 12.99[2] 15.85[2]
7 WISE 1541-2250 11 Y 21.2 15h 41m 51.57s −22° 50′ 25.03″ 0.351″ ± 0.108″[9] 9.3 +4.1/–2.2[9]
8 Ross 154 (V1216 Sagittarii) 12 M3.5Ve 10.43[2] 13.07[2] 18h 49m 49.4s −23° 50′ 10″ 0.336 90(1 78)″[5][6] 9.6813(512)
9 Ross 248 (HH Andromedae) 13 M5.5Ve 12.29[2] 14.79[2] 23h 41m 54.7s +44° 10′ 30″ 0.316 00(1 10)″[5] 10.322(36)
10 Epsilon Eridani (BD−09°697) 14 K2V[2] 3.73[2] 6.19[2] 03h 32m 55.8s −09° 27′ 30″ 0.309 99(0 79)″[5][6] 10.522(27) has two proposed planets[10]
11 Lacaille 9352 (CD−36°15693) 15 M1.5Ve 7.34[2] 9.75[2] 23h 05m 52.0s −35° 51′ 11″ 0.303 64(0 87)″[5][6] 10.742(31)
12 Ross 128 (FI Virginis) 16 M4.0Vn 11.13[2] 13.51[2] 11h 47m 44.4s +00° 48′ 16″ 0.298 72(1 35)″[5][6] 10.919(49)
13 EZ Aquarii
(GJ 866, Luyten 789-6)
EZ Aquarii A 17 M5.0Ve 13.33[2] 15.64[2] 22h 38m 33.4s −15° 18′ 07″ 0.289 50(4 40)″[5] 11.266(171)
EZ Aquarii B 17 M? 13.27[2] 15.58[2]
EZ Aquarii C 17 M? 14.03[2] 16.34[2]
14 Procyon
(α Canis Minoris)
Procyon A 20 F5V-IV[2] 0.38[2] 2.66[2] 07h 39m 18.1s +05° 13′ 30″ 0.286 05(0 81)″[5][6] 11.402(32)
Procyon B 20 DA[2] 10.70[2] 12.98[2]
15 61 Cygni 61 Cygni A (BD+38°4343) 22 K5.0V[2] 5.21[2] 7.49[2] 21h 06m 53.9s +38° 44′ 58″ 0.286 04(0 56)″[5][6] 11.403(22) first star (other than Sun) to have its distance measured[11]
61 Cygni B (BD+38°4344) 22 K7.0V[2] 6.03[2] 8.31[2] 21h 06m 55.3s +38° 44′ 31″
16 Struve 2398
(GJ 725, BD+59°1915)
Struve 2398 A (HD 173739) 24 M3.0V[2] 8.90[2] 11.16[2] 18h 42m 46.7s +59° 37′ 49″ 0.283 00(1 69)″[5][6] 11.525(69)
Struve 2398 B (HD 173740) 24 M3.5V[2] 9.69[2] 11.95[2] 18h 42m 46.9s +59° 37′ 37″
17 Groombridge 34
(GJ 15)
Groombridge 34 A (GX Andromedae) 26 M1.5V[2] 8.08[2] 10.32[2] 0h 18m 22.9s +44° 01′ 23″ 0.280 59(0 95)″[5][6] 11.624(39)
Groombridge 34 B (GQ Andromedae) 26 M3.5V[2] 11.06[2] 13.30[2]
18 Epsilon Indi
(CPD−57°10015)
Epsilon Indi A 28 K5Ve[2] 4.69[2] 6.89[2] 22h 03m 21.7s −56° 47′ 10″ 0.275 84(0 69)″[5][6] 11.824(30)
Epsilon Indi Ba 28 T1.0V >23 >25 22h 04m 10.5s −56° 46′ 58″
Epsilon Indi Bb 28 T6.0V >23 >25
19 DX Cancri (G 51-15) 31 M6.5Ve 14.78[2] 16.98[2] 08h 29m 49.5s +26° 46′ 37″ 0.275 80(3 00)″[5] 11.826(129)
20 Tau Ceti (BD−16°295) 32 G8Vp[2] 3.49[2] 5.68[2] 01h 44m 04.1s −15° 56′ 15″ 0.274 39(0 76)″[5][6] 11.887(33)
21 GJ 1061 (LHS 1565) 33 M5.5V[2] 13.09[2] 15.26[2] 03h 35m 59.7s −44° 30′ 45″ 0.272 01(1 30)″[12] 11.991(57) [13][14]
22 YZ Ceti (LHS 138) 34 M4.5V[2] 12.02[2] 14.17[2] 01h 12m 30.6s −16° 59′ 56″ 0.268 84(2 95)″[5][6] 12.132(133)
23 Luyten's Star (BD+05°1668) 35 M3.5Vn 9.86[2] 11.97[2] 07h 27m 24.5s +05° 13′ 33″ 0.263 76(1 25)″[5][6] 12.366(59)
24 Teegarden's star (SO025300.5+165258) 36 M6.5V 15.14[2] 17.22[2] 02h 53m 00.9s +16° 52′ 53″ 0.260 63(2 69)″[12] 12.514(129) [14]
24 SCR 1845-6357 SCR 1845-6357 A 37 M8.5V[2] 17.39 19.41 18h 45m 05.3s −63° 57′ 48″ 0.259 45(1 11)″[12] 12.571(54) [14]
SCR 1845-6357 B 37 T6[15] ? ? 18h 45m 02.6s −63° 57′ 52″
26 Kapteyn's Star (CD−45°1841) 39 M1.5V[2] 8.84[2] 10.87[2] 05h 11m 40.6s −45° 01′ 06″ 0.255 27(0 86)″[5][6] 12.777(43)
27 Lacaille 8760 (AX Microscopii) 40 M0.0V[2] 6.67[2] 8.69[2] 21h 17m 15.3s −38° 52′ 03″ 0.253 43(1 12)″[5][6] 12.870(57)
28 UGPS 0722-05 41 T10[2] 16.52[16] 07h 22m 27.3s[17] -05° 40′ 30″[17] 13(1.5)
29 Kruger 60
(BD+56°2783)
Kruger 60 A 42 M3.0V[2] 9.79[2] 11.76[2] 22h 27m 59.5s +57° 41′ 45″ 0.248 06(1 39)″[5][8] 13.149(74)
Kruger 60 B (DO Cephei) 42 M4.0V[2] 11.41[2] 13.38[2]
30 DEN 1048-3956 42 M8.5V[2] 17.39[2] 19.37[2] 10h 48m 14.7s −39° 56′ 06″ 0.247 71(1 55)″[12] 13.167(82) [18][19]
31 Ross 614
(V577 Monocerotis, GJ 234)
Ross 614A (LHS 1849) 45 M4.5V[2] 11.15[2] 13.09[2] 06h 29m 23.4s −02° 48′ 50″ 0.244 34(2 01)″[5][8] 13.349(110)
Ross 614B (LHS 1850) 45 M5.5V 14.23[2] 16.17[2]
32 Wolf 1061 (GJ 628, BD−12°4523) 47 M3.0V[2] 10.07[2] 11.93[2] 16h 30m 18.1s −12° 39′ 45″ 0.236 01(1 67)″[5][6] 13.820(98)
33 Van Maanen's star (GJ 35, LHS 7) 48 DZ7[2] 12.38[2] 14.21[2] 00h 49m 09.9s +05° 23′ 19″ 0.231 88(1 79)″[5][6] 14.066(109)
34 Gliese 1 (CD−37°15492) 49 M3.0V[2] 8.55[2] 10.35[2] 00h 05m 24.4s −37° 21′ 27″ 0.229 20(1 07)″[5][6] 14.231(66)
35 Wolf 424
(FL Virginis, LHS 333, GJ 473)
Wolf 424 A 50 M5.5Ve 13.18[2] 14.97[2] 12h 33m 17.2s +09° 01′ 15″ 0.227 90(4 60)″ [5] 14.312(289)
Wolf 424 B 50 M7Ve 13.17[2] 14.96[2]
36 TZ Arietis (GJ 83.1, Luyten 1159-16) 52 M4.5V[2] 12.27[2] 14.03[2] 02h 00m 13.2s +13° 03′ 08″ 0.224 80(2 90)″[5] 14.509(187)
37 GJ 687 (LHS 450, BD+68°946) 53 M3.0V[2] 9.17[2] 10.89[2] 17h 36m 25.9s +68° 20′ 21″ 0.220 49(0 82)″[5][6] 14.793(55)
38 LHS 292 (LP 731-58) 54 M6.5V[2] 15.60[2] 17.32[2] 10h 48m 12.6s −11° 20′ 14″ 0.220 30(3 60)″[5] 14.805(242)
39 GJ 674 (LHS 449) 55 M3.0V[2] 9.38[2] 11.09[2] 17h 28m 39.9s −46° 53′ 43″ 0.220 25(1 59)″[5][6] 14.809(107) has a planet[citation needed]
40 GJ 1245 GJ 1245 A 56 M5.5V[2] 13.46[2] 15.17[2] 19h 53m 54.2s +44° 24′ 55″ 0.220 20(1 00)″[5] 14.812(67)
GJ 1245 B 56 M6.0V[2] 14.01[2] 15.72[2] 19h 53m 55.2s +44° 24′ 56″
GJ 1245 C 56 M5.5 16.75[2] 18.46[2] 19h 53m 54.2s +44° 24′ 55″
41 WISE J1741+2553 59 ~T8-T10 ~14 15 (±3.6) [20][21]
42 GJ 440 (WD 1142-645) 60 DQ6[2] 11.50[2] 13.18[2] 11h 45m 42.9s −64° 50′ 29″ 0.216 57(2 01)″[5][6] 15.060(140)
43 GJ 1002 61 M5.5V[2] 13.76[2] 15.40[2] 00h 06m 43.8s −07° 32′ 22″ 0.213 00(3 60)″[5] 15.313(259)
44 Gliese 876 (Ross 780) 62 M3.5V[2] 10.17[2] 11.81[2] 22h 53m 16.7s −14° 15′ 49″ 0.212 59(1 96)″[5][6] 15.342(141) has four planets[22]
45 LHS 288 (Luyten 143-23) 63 M5.5V[2] 13.90[2] 15.51[2] 10h 44m 21.2s −61° 12′ 36″ 0.208 95(2 73)″[12] 15.610(204) [14]
46 GJ 412 GJ 412 A 64 M1.0V[2] 8.77[2] 10.34[2] 11h 05m 28.6s +43° 31′ 36″ 0.206 02(1 08)″[5][6] 15.832(83)
GJ 412 B (WX Ursae Majoris) 64 M5.5V[2] 14.48[2] 16.05[2] 11h 05m 30.4s +43° 31′ 18″
47 Groombridge 1618 (GJ 380) 66 K7.0V[2] 6.59[2] 8.16[2] 10h 11m 22.1s +49° 27′ 15″ 0.205 81(0 67)″[5][6] 15.848(52)
48 AD Leonis 67 M3.0V[2] 9.32[2] 10.87[2] 10h 19m 36.4s +19° 52′ 10″ 0.204 60(2 80)″[5] 15.942(218)
49 GJ 832 68 M3.0V[2] 8.66[2] 10.20[2] 21h 33m 34.0s −49° 00′ 32″ 0.202 78(1 32)″[5][6] 16.085(105) has a planet[citation needed]
50 LP 944-020 69 M9.0V[2] 18.50[2] 20.02[2] 03h 39m 35.2s −35° 25′ 41″ 0.201 40(4 20)″[23] 16.195(338)
51 DEN 0255-4700 70 L7.5V[2] 22.92[2] 24.44[2] 02h 55m 03.7s −47° 00′ 52″ 0.201 37(3 89)″[12] 16.197(313) [19]
# System Star Star # Stellar class Apparent magnitude (mV) Absolute magnitude (MV) Right ascension[2] Declination[2] Parallax[2][3]
Arcseconds(±err)
Distance[4]
Light-years (±err)
Additional
references
Designation Epoch J2000.0

Map of nearby stars

The following map shows all of the star systems within 14 light-years of the Sun (shown as Sol), except for two brown dwarfs discovered after 2009. Double and triple stars are shown "stacked", but the true location is the star closest to the central plane. Color corresponds to the table above.

Nearby Stars (14ly Radius).svg

Future and past

Distances of the nearest stars from 20,000 years ago until 80,000 years in the future

Ross 248, currently at a distance of 10.3 light-years, has a radial velocity of −81 km/s. In about 31,000 years it may be the closest star to the Sun for several millennia, with a minimum distance of 0.927 parsecs (3.02 light-years) in 36,000 years.[24] AC+79 3888 (Gliese 445), currently at a distance of 17.6 light-years, has a radial velocity of −119 km/s. In about 40,000 years it will be the closest star for a period of several thousand years.[24]

Known Hipparcos stars that have or will pass within 5.1 light-years of the Sun within ±2 million years:[25]

Star Name
HIP#
Minimum distance in parsecs
Minimum distance in light-years
Approach date in kiloyears
Current distance in parsecs
Current distance in light-years
Stellar classification
Mass in M
Current apparent magnitude
Constellation
Right ascension
Declination
Gliese 710 89825 0.311 1.01 1447 19.3 62.9 K7V 0.4–0.6 9.6 Serpens 18h 19m 50.843s −01° 56′ 18.98″
Proxima Centauri 70890 0.890 2.90 27.4 1.29 4.24 M5Ve 0.15 11.05 Centaurus 14h 29m 42.949s −62° 40′ 46.14″
Alpha Centauri A 71683 0.910 2.97 28.4 1.338 4.36 G2V 1.100[26] −0.01 Centaurus 14h 39m 36.495s −60° 50′ 02.31″
Alpha Centauri B 71681 0.910 2.97 28.4 1.338 4.36 K1V 0.907[26] 1.33 Centaurus 14h 39m 35.080s −60° 50′ 13.76″
AC+79 3888 57544 1.059 3.45 46.0 5.39 17.6 M4 0.15? 10.8 Camelopardalis 11h 47m 41.377s +78° 41′ 28.18″
Barnard's Star 87937 1.148 3.74 9.8 1.834 5.98 sdM4 0.144 9.54 Ophiuchus 17h 57m 48.498s +04° 41′ 36.25″
Zeta Leporis 27288 1.275 4.16 −861 21.5 70.2 A2Vann 2.0 3.55 Lepus 05h 46m 57.341s −14° 49′ 19.02″
Lalande 21185 54035 1.426 4.65 20.5 2.55 8.32 M2V 0.39 7.52 Ursa Major 11h 03m 20.194s +35° 58′ 11.55″
Gliese 208 26335 1.537 5.01 −500 11.38 37.1 K7 0.47 8.9 Orion 05h 36m 30.991s +11° 19′ 40.32″

See also


References

  1. ^ Weaver, Harold F. (1947). "The Visibility of Stars Without Optical Aid". Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific 59 (350): 232–243. Bibcode 1947PASP...59..232W. doi:10.1086/125956. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb cc cd ce cf cg ch ci cj ck cl cm cn co cp cq cr cs ct cu cv cw cx cy cz da db dc dd de df dg dh di dj dk dl dm dn do dp dq dr ds dt du dv dw dx dy dz ea eb ec ed ee ef eg eh ei ej ek el em en eo ep eq er es et eu ev ew ex ey ez fa fb fc fd fe ff fg fh fi fj fk fl fm fn fo fp fq fr fs ft fu fv fw fx fy fz ga Research Consortium on Nearby Stars, GSU (2007-09-17). "The One Hundred Nearest Star Systems". RECONS. http://www.chara.gsu.edu/RECONS/TOP100.posted.htm. Retrieved 2007-11-06. 
  3. ^ a b Parallaxes given by RECONS are a weighted mean of values in the sources given, as well as measurements by the RECONS program.
  4. ^ a b From parallax.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap General Catalogue of Trigonometric Parallaxes.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab Hipparcos Catalogue.
  7. ^ Burgasser et al. 2000
  8. ^ a b c Visual binary orbits and masses post Hipparcos, Staffan Söderhjelm, Astronomy and Astrophysics 341 (January 1999), pp. 121–140.
  9. ^ a b Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Cushing; Gelino; Griffith; Skrutskie; Marsh; Wright; Mainzer; Eisenhardt; McLean; Thompson; Bauer; Benford; Bridge; Lake; Petty; Stanford; Tsai; Bailey; Beichman; Bochanski; Burgasser; Capak; Cruz; Hinz; Kartaltepe; Knox; Manohar; Masters; Morales-Calderónn; Prato; Rodigas; Salvato; Schurr; Scoville; Simcoe; Stapelfeldt; Stern; Stock; Vacca (2011). "The First Hundred Brown Dwarfs Discovered by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)". arXiv:1108.4677v1 [astro-ph.SR]. 
  10. ^ Janson, M. et al. (September 2008), "A comprehensive examination of the ε Eridani system. Verification of a 4 micron narrow-band high-contrast imaging approach for planet searches", Astronomy and Astrophysics 488 (2): 771–780, arXiv:0807.0301, Bibcode 2008A&A...488..771J, doi:10.1051/0004-6361:200809984 
  11. ^ Bessel, F. W. (1839). "Bestimmung der Entfernung des 61sten Sterns des Schwans. Von Herrn Geheimen - Rath und Ritter Bessel" (in German). Astronomische Nachrichten 16 (5-6): 65. Bibcode 1839AN.....16...65B. doi:10.1002/asna.18390160502. "(page 92) Ich bin daher der Meinung, daß nur die jährliche Parallaxe = 0"3136 als das Resultat der bisherigen Beobachtungen zu betrachten ist"  A parallax of 313.6 mas yields a distance of 10.4 light years
  12. ^ a b c d e f Systems with their first accurate trigonometric parallaxes measured by RECONS
  13. ^ The solar neighborhood IV: discovery of the twentieth nearest star, Todd J. Henry, Philip A. Ianna, J. Davy Kirkpatrick, Hartmut Jahreiss, The Astronomical Journal 114, #1 (July 1997), pp. 388–395. doi:10.1086/118482
  14. ^ a b c d The Solar Neighborhood. XVII. Parallax Results from the CTIOPI 0.9 m Program: 20 New Members of the RECONS 10 Parsec Sample, Todd J. Henry, Wei-Chun Jao, John P. Subasavage, Thomas D. Beaulieu, Philip A. Ianna, Edgardo Costa, René A. Méndez, The Astronomical Journal 132, #6 (December 2006), pp. 2360–2371. doi:10.1086/508233
  15. ^ The very nearby M/T dwarf binary SCR 1845-6357, Markus Kasper, Beth A. Biller, Adam Burrows, Wolfgang Brandner, Jano Budaj, and Laird M. Close, Astronomy and Astrophysics 471, #2 (August 2007), pp. 655–659. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20077881
  16. ^ Lucas; Tinney; Ben Burningham; Leggett; Pinfield; Richard Smart; Jones; Federico Marocco et al. (2010). "The discovery of a very cool, very nearby brown dwarf in the Galactic plane". arXiv:1004.0317v2 [astro-ph.SR]. 
  17. ^ a b Lucas, Philip W.; Tinney; Burningham; Leggett; Pinfield; Smart; et al. (2010). "Discovery of a very cool brown dwarf amongst the ten nearest stars to the Solar System". arXiv:1004.0317v1 [astro-ph.SR]. 
  18. ^ The Solar Neighborhood. XIII. Parallax Results from the CTIOPI 0.9 Meter Program: Stars with μ >= 1.0" yr-1 (Motion sample), Wei-Chun Jao, Todd J. Henry, John P. Subasavage, Misty A. Brown, Philip A. Ianna, Jennifer L. Bartlett, Edgardo Costa, René A. Méndez, The Astronomical Journal 129, #4 (April 2005), pp. 1954–1967. doi:10.1086/428489
  19. ^ a b The Solar Neighborhood. XIV. Parallaxes from the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory Parallax Investigation—First Results from the 1.5 m Telescope Program, Edgardo Costa, René A. Méndez, W.-C. Jao, Todd J. Henry, John P. Subasavage, Misty A. Brown, Philip A. Ianna, and Jennifer Bartlett, The Astronomical Journal 130, #1 (July 2005), pp. 337–349. doi:10.1086/430473
  20. ^ Two new brown dwarf Solar neighbours discovered (14 July 2011)
  21. ^ Two very nearby (d ~ 5 pc) ultracool brown dwarfs detected by their large proper motions from WISE, 2MASS, and SDSS data (arXiv:1105.4059 : 4 Jul 2011)
  22. ^ Rivera, Eugenio J. et al. (July 2010). "The Lick-Carnegie Exoplanet Survey: A Uranus-mass Fourth Planet for GJ 876 in an Extrasolar Laplace Configuration". The Astrophysical Journal 719 (1): 890–899. arXiv:1006.4244. Bibcode 2010ApJ...719..890R. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/719/1/890. 
  23. ^ CCD astrometry of southern very low-mass stars, C. G. Tinney, Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 281, #2 (July 1996), pp. 644–658.
  24. ^ a b The Close Approach of Stars in the Solar Neighborhood
  25. ^ Table 3, Bobylev, Vadim V. (March 2010). "Searching for Stars Closely Encountering with the Solar System". Astronomy Letters 36 (3): 220–226. arXiv:1003.2160. Bibcode 2010AstL...36..220B. doi:10.1134/S1063773710030060. 
  26. ^ a b A Family Portrait of the Alpha Centauri System, eso307, 15 March 2003, European Southern Observatory. Accessed on line January 24, 2011.

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