Non-explosive demolition agents


Non-explosive demolition agents

Non-explosive demolition agents are commercial products that are an alternative to explosives in demolition, mining, and quarrying.[1] To use non-explosive demolition agents in demolition or quarrying, holes are drilled in the base rock like they would be drilled for use with conventional explosives. A slurry mixture of the non-explosive demolition agent and water is poured into the drill holes. Over the next few hours the slurry expands, cracking the rock in a pattern somewhat like the cracking that would occur from conventional explosives.

Non-explosive demolition agents offer many advantages including that they are silent and do not produce vibration the way a conventional explosive would. In some applications conventional explosives are more economical than non-explosive demolition agents. In many countries these are available without restriction unlike explosives which are highly regulated.

These agents are much safer than explosives, but it is important to follow directions closely in order to avoid steam explosions during the first few hours after these materials are placed.

Commercial products

Some commercially available non-explosive demolition agents include:

  • Ecobust (International)
  • Ecobust (North America)
  • Dexpan Canada (North America)
  • Demosol (International)
  • Kayati (International)
  • Buster by Cras (International)
  • Ter-Mite (International)
  • Dexpan (International)
  • FRACT.AG (USA)
  • Dexpan (USA)
  • FRACT.AG (International)
  • BRISTAR (International)
  • S-Mite (International)
  • ABDULAZIZ KARIM BAKHSH EST(KSA)
  • Betonamit
  • Expando (Australia & New Zealand)South pacific regions

See also

References


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