Mutsu Province


Mutsu Province
Map of Japanese provinces (1868) with Mutsu Province highlighted

Mutsu Province (陸奥国 Mutsu no kuni?) was an old province of Japan in the area of Fukushima, Miyagi, Iwate and Aomori prefecture and the municipalities of Kazuno and Kosaka in Akita Prefecture. It was also known as Ōshū (奥州?) or Rikushū (陸州?), and the term Ōu is often used to refer to combined area of Mutsu and the neighboring Dewa, which comprise the Japanese Tohoku.

Contents

History

Mutsu Province from 7c. to 712
Mutsu Province 718 for several years
Mutsu Province from Kamakura era to 1868

Mutsu, on northern Honshū, was one of the last provinces to be formed as land was taken from the indigenous Emishi and became the largest as it expanded northward. The ancient capital was in modern Miyagi Prefecture.

During the Sengoku Period, various clans ruled different parts of the province. The Uesugi clan had a castle town at Wakamatsu in the south, the Nanbu clan at Morioka in the north, and Date Masamune, a close ally of the Tokugawa, established Sendai, which is now the largest city in the Tōhoku Region.

Meiji era

Rikuō (Mutsu) Province from 1869 onwards

On December 7, 1868 (January 19, 1869 in the Gregorian calendar), four additional provinces (Rikuchū, Rikuzen, Iwaki, and Iwashiro) were separated from Mutsu, leaving only a rump corresponding to today's Aomori Prefecture. At the same time, while the characters of the name were unchanged, the official reading was changed to the on'yomi version Rikuō.[4]

Districts

Under Ritsuryō

Districts during the Meiji Era

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b Titsingh, Isaac. (1834). Annales des empereurs du japon, p. 64. at Google Books
  2. ^ Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric. (2005). "Mutsu" in Japan Encyclopedia, p. 676 at Google Books; n.b., Louis-Frédéric is pseudonym of Louis-Frédéric Nussbaum, see Deutsche Nationalbibliothek Authority File.
  3. ^ Titsingh, p. 119. at Google Books
  4. ^ 地名「三陸地方」の起源に関する地理学的ならびに社会学的問題PDF岩手大学教育学部)

References

External links


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