Scouting in California


Scouting in California

Scouting in California has a long history, from the 1910s to the present day, serving thousands of youth in programs related to their environments.

Contents

Early history (1910–1950)

In the early days of ″Scouting″ there were several different ″Scouting″ type organizations. Some of the organizations known to have members in California were:

The Boy Scouts of United States (a wing of the National Highway Protective Association),[3] Young Men's Christian Association and the Salvation Army may have also had ″Scouting″ type programs in California.[2]

In 1914, parents and Chinese-American boys organized their own Boy Scout troop in San Francisco, the first troop for Chinese Americans and possibly the first troop in San Francisco. It was recognized as Troop 3 once San Francisco became a council. The troop continues today.[4]

Further Information:

Recent history (1950–1990)

The 1953 National Scout jamboree was held at Irvine Ranch, California. Jamboree Road in Newport Beach, California was named to commemorate the site of the 1953 event.

The 1973 National Order of the Arrow Conference was held at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Boy Scouting in California today

There are twenty-four Boy Scouts of America local councils in California.

Alameda Council

Alameda Council is one of seven smaller Boy Scout councils in the United States, serving youth in the city of Alameda. It was first organized in December 1916, shortly after the organization of BSA councils in Berkeley and Oakland, making it the third oldest BSA council in Northern California. It is one of six BSA councils that serve the San Francisco Bay area.

Alameda Council

Order of the Arrow

Camps

  • Camp Cedarbrook (closed 1999)

California Inland Empire Council

California Inland Empire Council

Districts

  • Arrowhead District
  • Grayback District
  • High Desert District
  • River Valley District
  • Sunrise District
  • Tahquitz District
  • Temescal District
  • Three Peaks District
  • Old Baldy District as of May 2006 (Ontario, Montclair, Upland, and Rancho Cucamonga) (See history)

[5]

Camps

  • Camp Emerson, in Idyllwild-Pine Cove, California. Council operated since 1919, largely on land donated to the former Riverside County Council by developer and humanitarian Lee Emerson.
  • Camp Helendade, near Running Springs, California. Council operated since 1960. It was partially burned in the California October 2007 fires.[6][7][8] Camp Helendade was given to Arrowhead Area Council in 1960 by Helen and Dade Davis, replacing Camp Arataba, located in the Barton Flats area. Camp Arataba, part of the history of Arrowhead Area Council since 1920s, was the victim of a lodge fire in 1960. The loss inspired the Davises to donate the land for a camp to the Boy Scouts. Camp Helendade was originally called Camp Running Springs, but Edward Saxton, the Scout Executive of Arrowhead Area Council at the time, wanted to name the new camp in a manner that honored the donors. Hence the name Helendade was selected (Helen + Dade).[6]

History

The California Inland Empire Council (CIEC) was formed in 1973 through the merger of the Arrowhead Area and Riverside Area Councils. In 1974 Grayback Council also merged into the new council.[9] In 2006, the council acquired the San Bernardino County portions of Old Baldy Council.

Order of the Arrow

The Council is served by the Cahuilla Lodge #127.[10] It currently has nine chapters, roughly one serving each district (the High Desert District has two chapters due to its large geographic size). "[It] was formed January 1, 1973 from the merger of Tahquitz Lodge # 127 and Wisumahi Lodge # 478.[11] In 1974, the Lodge welcomed A-tsa Lodge # 380 into the family to make the territory of the Lodge as we know it today." With the merger of the Old Baldy Council, Navajo Lodge #8 also was merged into the Cahuilla Lodge.[10] The Lodge has received many awards, local and national, in its history, including the National Service Award (2001), the E. Urner Goodman Camping Award (most recently in 2006), and the Section W4B Spirit Award (17 times in 29 years; most recently in 2006 (tie)).

Crater Lake Council

Crater Lake Council serves Scouts in Oregon and California.

Golden Empire Council

Golden Empire Council

Golden Empire Council

The Golden Empire Council, first chartered in 1920, serves Scouts in a large section of Northern California, primarily the Sacramento Valley and the northern Sierra Nevada mountains.[12] The council headquarters are located in Sacramento. The council covers 16 counties in Northern California: Amador, Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Glenn, Nevada, Placer, Sacramento, Solano, Shasta, Sierra, Sutter, Tehama, Trinity, Yolo, and Yuba counties.

  • Over 17,000 youth members.
  • Yearly budget is about 3.1 million dollars

Districts

  • Amador District
  • Buttes Area District - serves Butte, Sutter and Yuba counties
  • Capital City District - serves West Sacramento, Rosemont, Rancho Cordova, Gold River, Sloughhouse and Rancho Murieta.
  • El Dorado District
  • Gold Country District
  • Iron Horse District - serves the communities of Roseville and Granite Bay in Placer County.
  • Northern Rivers District - serves Shasta, Tehema, and Trinity Counties.
  • Pioneer District
  • Pony Express District
  • Ranchero West District
  • Sierra Gateway District
  • Soaring Eagle District
  • Trailblazer District - serves the communities of Dixon, Vacaville, and Winters in Solano County.
  • Yolo District

Council Camps

Order of the Arrow

Greater Yosemite Council

Greater Yosemite Council

Districts

  • 49er District
  • Big Valley District
  • Chief Tenaya District
  • El Capitan District
  • Golden Heritage District
  • Waukeen District
  • Wawona District

Council Camps

Council Camps

  • Camp John Mensinger
  • Camp McConnell
  • Camp Isom

Order of the Arrow

Las Vegas Area Council

Formerly Boulder Dam Area Council, Las Vegas Area Council serves Scouts in Nevada, California and Arizona.

Long Beach Area Council

Long Beach Area Council (LBAC), headquartered in Long Beach, is one of five Boy Scouts of America councils in Los Angeles County, California.[13]

Long Beach Area Council

Districts

  • Los Fierros District
  • Polaris District

Council Camps

Honor Camping Society

The Long Beach Area Council does not charter an Order of the Arrow lodge, instead it has a preexisting honor society, the Tribe of Tahquitz.[14]

Los Angeles Area Council

Los Angeles Area Council (LAAC) (#33) serves most of the City of Los Angeles as well as several other cities in the greater Los Angeles area. It is one of five Boy Scouts of America councils in Los Angeles County, California.

Los Padres Council

Serving the youth of San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara counties 1919.

Los Padres Council

Districts

  • Cachuma District
  • Camino Real District
  • Del Norte District
  • Live Oak District
  • South Coast District

Council Camps

Order of the Arrow

Marin Council

One of the six councils that serves the San Francisco Bay area.

Marin Council

Council Camps

  • Camp Marin-Sierra
  • Camp Tamarancho

Order of the Arrow

Monterey Bay Area Council

Monterey Bay Area Council

Districts

  • Loma Prieta District- Santa Cruz County, plus Royal Oaks and Aromas
  • San Benito District- San Benito County, except Aromas
  • Santa Lucia District- Monterey County, except Royal Oaks

Council Camp

Order of the Arrow

In the Summer of 2007, the Esselen Lodge celebrated its 50th Anniversary.

The Esselen Lodge consists of three chapters

  • Sit Caw Yu, which means White Bear Clan (Loma Prieta District)
  • Yakiski Shanax, which means Thick Fog in Esselen (Santa Lucia District)
  • Quetzalcoatl, also known as the Q (San Benito District)

Mount Diablo Silverado Council

Mount Diablo Silverado Council serves chartered organizations and BSA units in Contra Costa County, Lake County, Napa County, Solano County (except the cities of Dixon, Rio Vista, and Vacaville), and the cities of Albany and Berkeley in northern Alameda County. It was formed in 1992 as the result of a merger between the former Silverado Area Council and the former Mount Diablo Council.

The Mount Diablo Silverado Council can trace its history back to the Berkeley Council which was organized in March 1916.[15]

Nevada Area Council

Nevada Area Council serves approximately 14,000 youth through chartered organizations and BSA units in northern Nevada and northeastern California. The parts of California served by the NAC are Alpine County, Lassen County, Plumas County, the northern portion of Mono County, and the eastern portions of El Dorado County, Placer County, and Sierra County.

Old Baldy Council

On May 1, 2006, Old Baldy Council was dissolved, with the chartered organizations and units reassigned into two neighboring councils. The Sunset District (in Los Angeles County) joined with the San Gabriel Valley Council and the Golden Eagle and Trails End Districts (in San Bernardino County) merged with the California Inland Empire Council. In the San Gabriel Valley Council the area that was formerly Old Baldy Council's Sunset District is now divided and added to expand the Valle Del Sol and Golden Eagle districts.[16]

Orange County Council

Dating back to 1921,[17] the council was formed by the merger of the North Orange County Council and the Orange Empire Council in 1972. The Orange County Council's Order of the Arrow Lodge, Wiatava #13, was the home lodge of the National Chief of the Order of the Arrow, Evan Chaffee, in 2007. Orange County Council is one of the 20 largest councils by traditional membership in the nation. In 2008 it had over 40,000 youth members.

Orange County Council

Districts

Council Camps

Former Council Camps

  • Camp RoKiLi, at Barton Flats (closed)
  • White's Landing (closed)
  • Rancho Las Flores at Camp Pendelton (closed)
  • Camp Myford, Irvine (closed)

Order of the Arrow

See also

Pacific Skyline Council

One of the six councils that serves the San Francisco Bay area.

Pacific Skyline Council

Districts

  • Discovery District
  • Redwood District
  • Stanford District

Council Camps

  • Cutter Scout Reservation (In the Santa Cruz Mountains)
  • Boulder Creek Scout Camp (In the Santa Cruz Mountains)
  • Camp Oljato is a camp for Boy Scouts located at Huntington Lake in Lakeshore, CA (Fresno County) and was founded in 1941 as a Jewish boys' singing camp. In 1942 the camp was converted to a Boy Scout camp. The camp's property ranges in elevation from 7,000 to just under 8,000 feet (2,400 m) above sea level. Camp Oljato is accessible only by pontoon boats which run on a regular schedule during the Scout camping season running from mid-June to mid-August.[19]

Order of the Arrow

Piedmont Council

The Piedmont Council (California) of BSA serves chartered organizations and BSA units located in the City of Piedmont, a city located in the East Bay hills and surrounded by the city of Oakland. The council was first chartered in 1921, and by some measurements is the smallest in the BSA, but has a high level of activity and serves a high percentage of the available youth living in Piedmont.

Piedmont Council is one of the six councils that serves the San Francisco Bay Area; the other five are (1) San Francisco Bay Area Council, (2) Alameda Council, (3) Mt. Diablo Silverado Council, (4) Marin Council and (5) Pacific Skyline Council.

Piedmont Council

Order of the Arrow

Redwood Empire Council

Redwood Empire Council CSP.png

A total of 3,788 youth are active members in 243 units. Of the 68,439 prospective members in the area served by the Redwood Empire Council, 6.5% currently enjoy Scouting.

Redwood Empire Council

Districts

Council Camps

  • Camp Masonite Navarro On 480 acres (190 ha) just west of the town of Navarro, CA on Hwy 128.
  • Camp Noyo
  • Camp Riggs Johnston

Order of the Arrow

San Diego-Imperial Council

San Diego-Imperial Council

The San Diego-Imperial Council is headquartered in San Diego, California, and serves youth members and volunteer leaders through Scout units in San Diego and Imperial counties of Southern California, as well as a portion of Arizona. Desert Pacific Council was renamed to San Diego-Imperial Council on January 3, 2005.

San Diego-Imperial Council

Districts

  • Black Mountain District
  • Desert Trails District
  • Heartland District
  • Kit Carson District
  • Mission District
  • Pacific Coast District
  • Pacific Crest District
  • Santa Margarita District
  • Skyline District
  • Scripps-Mesa District
  • Sweetwater District
  • Torrey Pines District

Council Camps

  • Mataguay Scout Ranch
  • Camp Balboa
  • San Diego Youth Aquatic Center

Order of the Arrow

Tiwahe Lodge #45 is the Order of the Arrow Lodge that services the San Diego Imperial Council. It has a yearly average membership of 1,030 scouts and scouters. The Order of the Arrow is the Honor Society of the Boy Scouts of America

Tiwahe Lodge was formed from the merger of Ashie Lodge #436 and Pang Lodge #532 in 1992.

Tiwahe Lodge has been the recipient of the Quality Lodge Award 15 times in a row. Tiwahe Lodge also received the National Service Award in 2005.

Tiwahe is a member of Section W-4S in the Western Region of the Boy Scouts of America. Tiwahe is one of four lodges in this section, the other three are Wiatava #13, Cahuilla #127, and Ta Tanka #488. Tiwahe Lodge has produced 3 Section Chiefs and 3 Section Advisors.

Tiwahe Lodge currently runs three lodge events throughout the year. The first is the Fall Fellowship Weekend in November, which consists of training and lodge officer elections. Lodge Leadership Development is held in January and is the primary tool for training new lodge and chapter officers. Spring Encampment is help in March and is a service weekend usually held at Camp Mataguay.

Tiwahe Lodge currently has nine chapters acting within the lodge: Allohak, Bitani, Elauwit, Hadaazli-to, Kah-Shinni, Naabaahii, Pischk, Shash-Tsoh, and Wulinaxin.

San Francisco Bay Area Council

Formed by a merger of the San Francisco and Oakland Area Councils.[20] Located in the San Francisco Bay Area, serving the cities of Colma, Daly City (northern section), San Francisco, Emeryville, Oakland, San Leandro, Hayward, Fremont, Union City, Newark, Pleasanton, Dublin, and Livermore, as well as unincorporated communities such as Castro Valley, San Lorenzo, and Sunol. Headquartered in San Leandro, this council surrounds both the Piedmont and Alameda Councils.

One of the six councils that serves the San Francisco Bay area.

San Francisco Bay Area Council

Districts

  • Golden Gate District (Colma, Daly City, and San Francisco)
  • Mission Peak District (Fremont, Newark, and Union City)
  • Peralta District (Emeryville and Oakland)
  • Tres Ranchos District (Castro Valley, Hayward, San Leandro, and San Lorenzo)
  • Twin Valley District (Dublin, Livermore, Pleasanton, and Sunol)

Council Camps

Camp Royaneh began its existence in Cazadero in the mid 19-teens and moved to its present location in 1925 when the Scout Executive, Raymond O Hanson bought a piece of property that was formerly the Watson Ranch. Since that time, it has served countless Scouts and Scouters. Camp Royaneh is the oldest scout camp west of the Mississippi River.[21]

Wente Scout Reservation is located outside of Willits, California. It is owned and operated by San Francisco Bay Area Council.[22][23]

Order of the Arrow

San Gabriel Valley Council

Located in Los Angeles County's San Gabriel Valley, San Gabriel Valley Council (#40) is one of five Councils serving Los Angeles County.

Santa Clara County Council

Santa Clara County Council, Inc. is a Boy Scouts of America council headquartered in San Jose, California. As of 2004, the council serves over 11,000 youth in over 400 Boy Scout troops, Cub Scout packs, Venturing crews, and Explorer posts.

Camp Hi-Sierra

It operates 5 weeks of Boy Scout Summer Camp at Camp Hi-Sierra. One of the six councils that serves the San Francisco Bay area.

Sequoia Council

(not to be confused with the Sequoyah Council located in Tennessee and Virginia)
Sequoia Council

Sequoia Council

Districts

  • Chawanakee District
  • Golden West District
  • Kings River District
  • Live Oak District
  • Mount Whitney District
  • Thunderbird District

Council Camps

  • Camp Chawanakee
  • Camp Wortman

Order of the Arrow

Southern Sierra Council

Southern Sierra Council

Southern Sierra Council

Districts

  • Desert District
  • Inyo-Mono District
  • Meridian District
  • Pathfinder District
  • Trailblazer District

Council Camps

  • Camp Kern
  • Camp Mirimichi
  • Camp Jewett was sold in 2008

Order of the Arrow

Ventura County Council

Ventura County Council of the Boy Scouts of America was officially chartered as Council 57 on June 23, 1921, after a series of meetings that followed a proposal put forward at a County Chamber of Commerce meeting on March 28, 1921 in the Masonic Hall. Mr. C. H. Whipple, then of Moorpark and later Oxnard, became the president; and Col. J.L. Howland became commissioner. Harvey R. Cheesman, an assistant scout executive in the Los Angeles Council, became the first Scout Executive, assuming his duties on July 11.[24]

Ventura County Council

History

The original charter indicates that there were nine troops in existence at the time. Research shows that these most likely included: In June 1910 the Ventura Free Press published an article, "Boys Organize Band of Scouts".

A band of Scouts was organized in the Pastor's study of the Congregational Church Monday evening, June 20. So far as we can learn this is the first organization of this worldwide movement in Ventura or even in California. The movement originated in the mind of Ernest Thompson Seton. It has been pushed in England under the leadership of General Baden Powell, and now there are in England three hundred thousand boys enlisted in the movement.

We have framed our constitution after the international one, but changed it to meet the needs of our Western life and customs. It includes the things that tend to the physical and moral development of the live boy.

Tramps in the hills, with the study of nature, will be a part of the physical development. It also includes many of the things called for by Thompson Seton. For the moral development, we have first the study of the Book, each Sunday.

Honor in all things is called for. Each boy must attend school if possible, must have some regular labor for which he receives pay.

Six months after membership is attained he must have a bank account in his own name. Our badge will be the arrowhead, with the words upon it, "Be Prepared. These words have great significance known only to the wearers of the badge, in fact it is the sign to them of life, and can be taken from them if it is not honored.

The band now numbers only twelve, but the invitation is extended to any boy of proper age who is not in any Sunday School, and wishes to live a clean life to join us. We say "come with us and we will do you good".

Records of the Ventura Congregational church indicate that the group was officially disbanded in January 1914. Various articles gleaned from the local newspapers indicate that troops were active in most of the local communities. The YMCA had one in Santa Paula in 1911. They then formed another in Fillmore in 1912 with 25 boys. The scoutmaster was Mr. A.J. Dicks, and his assistant Professor A.C. Marcey. Ray Horton was the Seal Patrol leader, and his brother Harold leader of the Foxes. The same article mentions leaders from a group of 20 scouts in Bardsdale helping to form the group. In February 1913, the Oxnard Courier talks of a YMCA group under Scoutmaster Kirchner and Commissioner Stant, while in November 1913 the Star mentions Scoutmaster Ramsey expecting to enroll as many as 100 boys and young men and is setting up a recruiting station at City Hall. A later Courier article in February 1916 mentions Scoutmaster Rev. J.M. Barhart, assisted by Ross Winter and Elmer Johnson, while the committee consisted of George Hume, Frank Petit, and J.W. Shillington. A surname that appears in the boys noted, Willett is very familiar to long time scouters in the council, as Camp Willett gets its name from the family. Surely additional information is buried in the old microfilm and will shed more light as research continues.

The earliest of these was Troop 1, sponsored by St. Paul's Methodist Episcopal Church of Oxnard from February 1916 to February 1918. Next in line is Troop 1 (later 301) of Santa Paula sponsored by The Clipper Club of Presbyterian Mariners Club from December 1917 to December 1919, again from November 1920 to November 1933, and once more from August 1934 to February 1963. Moorpark Troop 1, sponsored by the Community M.E. Church existed from December 1919 to December 1922; Ojai Troop 1, by a Group of Citizens, went from December 1919 to December 1920; and Troop 1 of Ventura (later 101), sponsored by the Rotary Club appears from December 1919 to December 1926. 101 still exists today, but is sponsored by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, its last reincarnation after an interim sponsorship by the Kiwanis. Troop 1 of Port Hueneme appears to have existed, beginning in April 1916; but disappears before the council was chartered.

Districts

  • Camarillo District — Camarillo, Somis and Point Mugu
  • Channel Islands District — Oxnard, Port Hueneme, and El Rio
  • Conejo Valley District — Thousand Oaks, Newbury Park, Westlake Village and Oak Park
  • Matilija District — Ventura, Montalvo, Saticoy, Ojai, Meiners Oaks, and Oak View
  • Ronald Reagan District — Simi Valley and Moorpark
  • Santa Paula/Fillmore District — Santa Paula, Piru, and Fillmore

Council Camps

Camp Three Falls is located in the Los Padres National Forest at the base of Mount Piños in the northern portion of Ventura County, approximately 50 miles (80 km) north of Castaic Junction. The camp has been open since 1933. The name is derived from the three waterfalls: North Falls, Middle Falls, and Bitter Falls, that are located on the streams running from the mountains above the camp. The camp is at 5,400 feet (1,600 m) elevation. The summer weather at this elevation is dry and the temperature ranges from 70-90 °F with cool evenings and crisp nights.[25]

This is the Council where Rock Climbing and Rappelling started in the Scouting Program in 1973. Camp Three Falls was the first BSA summer camp to offer Rock Climbing and Rappelling as a new program element in scouting. This was 22 years before it was considered to become a merit badge at Philmont. A 57-foot (17 m) Climbing tower was built at Camp Three Falls in the spring of 2003.

Camp Willett Mrs. Edith Scott Willett donated a 535-acre (217 ha) plot near Oak View, California in 1954 and named in her honor. Camp Willett has been used for events such as Camporees. There are no facilities at this camp. Extensive history PDF's and maps can be found at: http://sites.google.com/site/campwillettcamporee/Home/camp-willett-history . Also check: http://www.vccbsa.org/Camping/Camp%20Willett.aspx

Order of the Arrow

Topa Topa Lodge #291

Many years ago the Chumash Indians roamed the forests and hunted game in the bountiful Ojai Valley. When a bad omen came to the tribe, the great spirit sent two white gophers to Chief Matilija. The gophers instructed the chief and his people to perform acts of unselfish service and sacrifice. Chief Matilija perished in a great calamity, but with the acts of service and devotion done, the great spirit sent Chief Topa Topa to the Chumash to save the worthy people from an evil horde. In the 1920s the spirit of unselfish service was rekindled at Ventura County Council's Camp Grey. There, the "Tribe of Matilija" was founded as the honor camping organization of the council. The tribe had as its purpose to promote camping at Camp Grey. The Order of the Arrow in Ventura County was established in June 1944, when ceremonies were conducted during the Camp-O-Ral at Steckel Park to induct 13 selected scouts as charter members of Topa Topa Lodge #291 of the Order of the Arrow. Thus the Order of the Arrow came to replace the "Tribe of Matilija." The new lodge took its name from the legendary Chief Topa Topa.

Verdugo Hills Council

Verdugo Hills Council (VHC) is one of five Boy Scouts of America councils in Los Angeles County, California. Headquartered in Glendale.

Verdugo Hills Council

Districts

  • Foothills District
  • Iron Eyes Cody District

Council Camps

  • Camp Verdugo Oaks
  • Camp Silver Fir

Order of the Arrow

Western Los Angeles County Council

Western Los Angeles County Council (WLACC) (51) is one of five Boy Scouts of America councils in Los Angeles County, California. Headquartered in Van Nuys, the WLACC services over 30,000 youth spanning six districts including the San Fernando Valley, Santa Clarita Valley, Antelope Valley, Malibu, and much of West Los Angeles.

Western Los Angeles County Council

History

The Western Los Angeles County Council was formed in 1972, when the Crescent Bay Council merged with the San Fernando Valley Council to form the Great Western Council. The Great Western Council was later renamed Western Los Angeles County Council.

Districts

The Western Los Angeles County Council is divided into six districts.

Order of the Arrow

The Malibu Lodge #566, chartered in 1972, serves 755 Arrowmen as of 2004. The lodge totem is a Pacific blue shark, and the name translates to "From the Mountains to the Sea" in the Chumash language. Malibu Lodge was created in 1972 from the merger of Tamet Lodge 225 and Walika Lodge 228.

Council camps

Current camps
Camp Emerald Bay has been operating since 1925, when it was first opened by the Crescent Bay Area Council. It offers year-round activities as well as having a great waterfront and being a summer camp.
Camp Josepho is a year round camp owned and operated by the Western Los Angeles County Council of the Boy Scouts of America. The 110-acre (45 ha) camp is located in the Santa Monica Mountains in Los Angeles County and has been serving Scouting and community groups since 1941.
The land on which Camp Josepho now lies was originally donated to the Crescent Bay Council in 1941 by Anatol Josepho and his wife Ganna. The camp quickly rose to the forefront of Scouting camps, becoming known as the West Point of Scouting.[citation needed] The focal point of the camp is its large old western style lodge now named the Malibu Lodge after the Malibu Chapter of the Order of the Arrow.
In January 2005, a flood washed out the main road into Camp Josepho. The camp remained closed for less than a month, reopening (to backpacking) in February 2005. The camp remained inaccessible to vehicular traffic while the road was studied by civil engineers. As of July 2007, the road was open once again.
Camp Whitsett is a summer camp in the Giant Sequoia National Monument which has been operating since 1947. Its 'sister camp' is Sierra Expeditions, which offers backpacking and other high-adventure activities.
  • Camp Wolverton, Sequoia National Park. It is apocryphally said to be the only Boy Scout camp in a National Park.
Past camps
  • Camp Jubilee (? – 2003)
  • Camp Slauson, Topanga Canyon (1910 – late 1970s)
  • Camp Temescal, Pacific Palisades (? – 1930)
  • Circle X

Girl Scouting in California

Map of Girl Scout Councils in California

There are 13 Girl Scout councils in California of which 8 have headquarters there.

Girl Scouts Arizona Cactus-Pine Council

In California, serves a small portion of far eastern San Bernardino County.

Headquarters: Phoenix, Arizona Website: http://www.girlscoutsaz.org/

Girl Scouts of California's Central Coast

New council forming by the merger of Monterey and Tres Condados councils on October 1, 2007. It serves girls in Ventura, Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, San Benito, Monterey and Santa Cruz counties.

Headquarters: Camarillo, California
Website: http://www.girlscoutsccc.org/

Girl Scouts of Central California South

Girl Scouts of Central California South was formerly Girl Scouts Golden Valley Council before expansion and renaming in October 2008.

Headquarters: Fresno, California
Website: http://www.girlscoutsccs.org/


Girl Scouts of Greater Los Angeles

The new council, "Girl Scouts of Greater Los Angeles", is a merger on December 1, 2008 of Angeles Girl Scout Council, Girl Scout Council of Greater Long Beach, Joshua Tree Council (southeastern portion), Mt. Wilson Vista Council, Spanish Trails Council, and San Fernando Valley Girl Scout Council. It serves nearly 45,000 girls and has over 22,000 volunteers.

Headquarters: 801 S Grand, Suite 300, Los Angeles, CA 90017

Website: http://www.girlscoutsla.org/

Camps:

  • Camp Mariposa in Altadana
  • Montrose Program Center in Montrose
  • San Gabriel Program Center in San Gabriel, CA
  • El Potrero de la Cienega is 390 acres (160 ha) in Cleveland National Forest
  • Twin Valleys is 25 acres (10 ha) near Wrightwood
  • La Casita Program Center near Claremont
  • Johnstone Program Center
  • Covina Program Center
  • Chino Program Center
  • Camp Lakota is nearly 60 acres (24 ha) in Los Padres National Forest
  • Camp Osito Rancho is 160 acres (65 ha) in Big Bear Lake in the San Bernardino Mountain Range

Girl Scouts Heart of Central California

A new council formed on June 1, 2007, by the merger of Muir Trail and Tierra del Oro councils. It serves more than 29,000 girls and has over 10,000 volunteers in 18 counties (Alpine, Amador, Calaveras, Colusa, El Dorado , Glenn, Mariposa, Merced, Nevada, Placer, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Solano, Stanislaus, Sutter, Tuolumne, Yolo, and Yuba).

Headquarters: Sacramento, California
Website: http://www.girlscoutshcc.org/

Service Centers:

  • Stockton
  • Modesto

Camps:

  • Fleming
  • Camp Menzies

Girl Scouts of Northern California

A new council formed by the merger of Konocti, San Francisco Bay Area, Santa Clara County, Sierra Cascade, and Napa-Solano councils on October 1, 2007. It serves about 55,000 girls in 19 counties (Alameda, Butte, Contra Costa, Del Norte, Glenn, Humboldt, Lake, Marin, Mendocino, Napa, Santa Clara, San Francisco, San Mateo, Shasta, Siskiyou, Solano, Sonoma, Tehama, and Trinity).

Headquarters: Oakland, California and San Jose, California
Website: http://girlscoutsnorcal.org/

Known for it annual "Golden Gate Bridging" where Junior Girl Scouts bridging to Cadette Girl Scouts walk across the Golden Gate Bridge. This event was started in 1981 with one troop but now has several thousand scouts involved each year many of them from outside of the council.[26]

Camps

  • Camp Bothin
  • Camp Deer Lake located at 6,800 ft (2,100 m)
  • Camp Sugar Pine located in the Sierra Nevada
  • Camp Butano Creek in San Mateo County
  • Hayward Cabin
  • Ida Smith
  • Twin Canyon
  • Camp Two Sentinels, located at 8,000 ft (2,400 m) on Lake Kirkwood in Eldorado National Forest [5]
  • Camp Arequipa
  • Skylark Ranch 280 acres (110 ha) on the Pacific coast north of Santa Cruz.[6]
  • Hidden Falls has 90 acres (36 ha) in the redwood forests of the Santa Cruz mountains.[7]
  • Camp Metro — day camp in Berryessa

Camp Bothin

Camp Bothin officially known as the Bothin Youth Center, is a Girl Scout summer camp. Since 1948 it has been located in Marin County, California. The site is managed by Girl Scouts of Northern California and supported mostly through private foundation grants and individual donations.

Convalescent home

In 1905 Camp Bothin was established as "Hill Farm", a convalescent home for women and children, near Fairfax, California, on property then owned by Henry E. Bothin. Before antibiotics, medicine had few treatments other than rest and good food for many illnesses, especially tuberculosis (TB). The patients were initially housed in an old farmhouse. Normally, Hill Farm was home to 30 patients, but during the summer the mild climate allowed as many as 60, who were housed in tents and slept on cots. During this time, Miss Elizabeth H. Ashe was director.

In 1910, the officers formed the corporation named Bothin Convalescent Home for Women and Children. Mr. Bothin deeded 152 acres (62 ha) of land to this corporation. The old farm house was torn down and a rustic building, now known as Manor House, was erected that could accommodate 40 patients. It had deep sleeping porches (fresh air was considered important for TB patients) and an outdoor dining room.

That same year the Arequipa Sanatorium, directed by Dr. Philip King Brown, was opened to serve women in the first stages of TB. At the time, the only known treatment was rest and good nutrition, in the hopes that the lungs could recover and heal. The name Arequipa, taken from a city in Peru, was said to be a Native American word signifying 'place of rest.' Following the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, dust- and ash-filled air had contributed to a tuberculosis epidemic in San Francisco.

With the help of local artists and members of the area's philanthropic community, Dr. Brown introduced therapeutic handcrafts to the women, to combat idleness and avoid the stigma of charity. The hospital hired potter Frederick Hurten Rhead to teach patients and develop a pottery studio. Work from the Arequipa pottery is now highly prized among collectors. In 1913 Rhead was dismissed for not being sufficiently businesslike, as he led his students to experiment with glazes and techniques, and tried to get the best materials for them. His successor at the pottery was directed to reduce production costs.

In 1917, the Bothin Helping Fund was incorporated. This organization, now known as the Bothin Foundation, was responsible for raising the $30,000 needed to build Stone House. It was here that professional and business women could come to rest and recuperate after illness.

As treatment methods for TB changed, the need for the Bothin Convalescent Hospital was reduced. The Bothin property was abandoned from 1922-1940.

Girl Scout camp

In 1948, Miss Ashe offered a small building now known as Little House to the San Francisco Girl Scouts for troop camping. A few years later she made Manor House available for Girl Scout use, and by 1955 the entire Bothin property was offered to the Council for its use. The Girl Scouts developed the property as a camp, and added a swimming pool. They changed the name to the Henry E. Bothin Youth Center.

In the 1950s, Arequipa was closed as a hospital. In 1959 the property was leased to the Girl Scouts. By 1963 both sides of the property began to operate as the Henry E. Bothin Youth Center.

Timeline
1905
Hill Farm convalescent home for children opened by Henry E. Bothin
1910
  • Bothin Convalescent Home Board founded and 152 acres (0.62 km2) is deeded.
  • Manor House built.
  • Arequipa built.
1917
Bothin Helping Fund was incorporated to distribute funds under the terms of H. Bothin.
1919
Stone House completed.
1922–1940
Bothin was abandoned.
1948
Use of Little House and Bothin property was offered to Girl Scouts.
1948–1953
During this time, 181 troops, representing 2221 Girl Scouts and 556 leaders, made use of Bothin.
1954
Severely crippled and mentally retarded Girl Scouts attend camp sessions.
1955
  • Use of Bothin offered to Girl Scout for at least 10 years.
  • Name changed to Henry E. Bothin Youth Center.
1959
Use of Arequipa offered to Marin Girl Scout Council.
1963
Entire property becomes Henry E. Bothin Youth Center.

Girl Scout Council of Orange County

Headquarters: Irvine, California
Website: http://www.gscoc.org

Camps:

Girl Scouts, San Diego-Imperial Council

Headquarters: San Diego, California
Website: http://www.girlscoutssdi.org

Girl Scouts of San Gorgonio Council

This council will remain mostly the same except it will acquire some bits from neighboring councils (the realignment hopes to decrease the number of councils that cross state and county lines).[27] Its name is also likely to change.

Headquarters: Redlands, California
Website: http://www.gssgc.org

Girl Scouts of Southern Nevada

See Scouting in Nevada for more information. In California it serves girls in southern Inyo country.

Headquarters: Las Vegas, Nevada
Website: http://www.girlscoutsnv.org/

Girl Scouts of The Sierra Nevada

Headquarters: Reno, Nevada
Website: http://www.gssn.org/

International Scouting units in California

Cambodian Scouting in exile existed at least into the early 1990s in Los Angeles, alongside fellow Vietnamese Scouting in exile and Laotian Scouting in exile groups. Colonel Oleg Pantyukhov, Chief Scout of Russia, moved to the United States, where large troops of Russian Scouts were established in cities such as San Francisco, Burlingame, California, Los Angeles, etc. Also, Külföldi Magyar Cserkészszövetség Hungarian Scouting maintains four troops in Los Angeles and two in San Francisco. There is also a branch of Polish Scouting for girls in the San Francisco Bay Area.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Oakland-Piedmont Council History 1910 - 1921
  2. ^ a b Ray, Mark Team of Rivals in Special Events "Scouting", January - February 2010, Retrieved 2010-11-08
  3. ^ Richardson, Norman Egbert; Loomis, Ormond E. (1915). The boy scout movement applied by the church. New York: Charles Scriber's Sons. pp. 9–10. http://books.google.com/books?id=MxMAAAAAYAAJ. 
  4. ^ Tong, Benson (2004). Asian American children: a historical handbook and guide. Greenwood Publishing Group. pp. 13, 193. ISBN 0313330425. http://books.google.com/books?id=iq3Hu3MBpDQC. 
  5. ^ California Inland Empire Council
  6. ^ a b "Running Springs Fire Update". California Inland Empire Council. Oct 2007. http://www.bsa-ciec.org/openrosters/vieworgpagelink.asp?orgkey=21&linkkey=15211. Retrieved 2007-10-23. 
  7. ^ "Fires Consume 5,000 Acres Total". Fire & Wind. The Sun Daily Bulletin. Oct 2007. http://www.insidesocal.com/sb/fire/. Retrieved 2007-10-23. 
  8. ^ "Main Page Website". Camp Helendade Website. Oct 2007. http://www.camphelendade.org/. Retrieved 2007-10-23. 
  9. ^ http://www.bsa-ciec.org/about/history.php
  10. ^ a b History - Cahuilla Lodge # 127, Order of the Arrow, Boy Scouts of America
  11. ^ http://www.oaimages.com/478.shtml
  12. ^ [1]
  13. ^ Long Beach Area Council
  14. ^ Tribe of Tahquitz
  15. ^ Lindbald, Victor. 196-?, History of Mt. Diablo Council Boy Scouts of America cited in Dobkin, Marjorie. 2005, ″Mount Diablo Silverado Council, Boy Scouts of America (BSA), March 7, 2005″ Attachment D to Ward Hill letter of March 7, 2005. (in Rena Rickles letter of March 7, 2005).
  16. ^ "Old Baldy Council, Ontario, California, Boy Scouts of America". http://www.obcbsa.org/index.htm. Retrieved 2009-01-08. 
  17. ^ Orange County - 1910 to 1929
  18. ^ "ScoutWeek Issue #86". http://www.ocbsa.org/site/c.khKQIWPBIoE/b.4390569/k.408F/20080725_Issue_86.htm. Retrieved 2009-01-31. [dead link])
  19. ^ [2], Pacific Skyline Council - Camp Oljato.
  20. ^ http://www.sfbac.org/sfbac_history.cfm
  21. ^ [3]
  22. ^ [4]
  23. ^ wente
  24. ^ Ventura County Council
  25. ^ Ventura County Council, BSA
  26. ^ http://www.girlscoutsbayarea.org/pages/events/goldengate.html
  27. ^ http://www.gssgc.org/Forms/REALIGNMENT_FAQ%20for%20GSSGC.pdf

External links and references


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