To throw on


To throw on
Throw Throw, v. t. [imp. {Threw} (thr[udd]); p. p. {Thrown} (thr[=o]n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Throwing}.] [OE. [thorn]rowen, [thorn]rawen, to throw, to twist, AS. [thorn]r[=a]wan to twist, to whirl; akin to D. draaijen, G. drehen, OHG. dr[=a]jan, L. terebra an auger, gimlet, Gr. ? to bore, to turn, ? to pierce, ? a hole. Cf. {Thread}, {Trite}, {Turn}, v. t.] 1. To fling, cast, or hurl with a certain whirling motion of the arm, to throw a ball; -- distinguished from to toss, or to bowl. [1913 Webster]

2. To fling or cast in any manner; to drive to a distance from the hand or from an engine; to propel; to send; as, to throw stones or dust with the hand; a cannon throws a ball; a fire engine throws a stream of water to extinguish flames. [1913 Webster]

3. To drive by violence; as, a vessel or sailors may be thrown upon a rock. [1913 Webster]

4. (Mil.) To cause to take a strategic position; as, he threw a detachment of his army across the river. [1913 Webster]

5. To overturn; to prostrate in wrestling; as, a man throws his antagonist. [1913 Webster]

6. To cast, as dice; to venture at dice. [1913 Webster]

Set less than thou throwest. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

7. To put on hastily; to spread carelessly. [1913 Webster]

O'er his fair limbs a flowery vest he threw. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

8. To divest or strip one's self of; to put off. [1913 Webster]

There the snake throws her enameled skin. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

9. (Pottery) To form or shape roughly on a throwing engine, or potter's wheel, as earthen vessels. [1913 Webster]

10. To give forcible utterance to; to cast; to vent. [1913 Webster]

I have thrown A brave defiance in King Henry's teeth. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

11. To bring forth; to produce, as young; to bear; -- said especially of rabbits. [1913 Webster]

12. To twist two or more filaments of, as silk, so as to form one thread; to twist together, as singles, in a direction contrary to the twist of the singles themselves; -- sometimes applied to the whole class of operations by which silk is prepared for the weaver. --Tomlinson. [1913 Webster]

{To throw away}. (a) To lose by neglect or folly; to spend in vain; to bestow without a compensation; as, to throw away time; to throw away money. (b) To reject; as, to throw away a good book, or a good offer.

{To throw back}. (a) To retort; to cast back, as a reply. (b) To reject; to refuse. (c) To reflect, as light.

{To throw by}, to lay aside; to discard; to neglect as useless; as, to throw by a garment.

{To throw down}, to subvert; to overthrow; to destroy; as, to throw down a fence or wall.

{To throw in}. (a) To inject, as a fluid. (b) To put in; to deposit with others; to contribute; as, to throw in a few dollars to help make up a fund; to throw in an occasional comment. (c) To add without enumeration or valuation, as something extra to clinch a bargain.

{To throw off}. (a) To expel; to free one's self from; as, to throw off a disease. (b) To reject; to discard; to abandon; as, to throw off all sense of shame; to throw off a dependent. (c) To make a start in a hunt or race. [Eng.]

{To throw on}, to cast on; to load.

{To throw one's self down}, to lie down neglectively or suddenly.

{To throw one's self on} or {To throw one's self upon}. (a) To fall upon. (b) To resign one's self to the favor, clemency, or sustain power of (another); to repose upon.

{To throw out}. (a) To cast out; to reject or discard; to expel. ``The other two, whom they had thrown out, they were content should enjoy their exile.'' --Swift. ``The bill was thrown out.'' --Swift. (b) To utter; to give utterance to; to speak; as, to throw out insinuation or observation. ``She throws out thrilling shrieks.'' --Spenser. (c) To distance; to leave behind. --Addison. (d) To cause to project; as, to throw out a pier or an abutment. (e) To give forth; to emit; as, an electric lamp throws out a brilliant light. (f) To put out; to confuse; as, a sudden question often throws out an orator.

{To throw over}, to abandon the cause of; to desert; to discard; as, to throw over a friend in difficulties.

{To throw up}. (a) To resign; to give up; to demit; as, to throw up a commission. ``Experienced gamesters throw up their cards when they know that the game is in the enemy's hand.'' --Addison. (b) To reject from the stomach; to vomit. (c) To construct hastily; as, to throw up a breastwork of earth. [1913 Webster] [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Throw — Throw, v. t. [imp. {Threw} (thr[udd]); p. p. {Thrown} (thr[=o]n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Throwing}.] [OE. [thorn]rowen, [thorn]rawen, to throw, to twist, AS. [thorn]r[=a]wan to twist, to whirl; akin to D. draaijen, G. drehen, OHG. dr[=a]jan, L. terebra …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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