To put in
Put Put (put; often p[u^]t in def. 3), v. i. 1. To go or move; as, when the air first puts up. [Obs.] --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

2. To steer; to direct one's course; to go. [1913 Webster]

His fury thus appeased, he puts to land. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

3. To play a card or a hand in the game called put. [1913 Webster]

{To put about} (Naut.), to change direction; to tack.

{To put back} (Naut.), to turn back; to return. ``The French . . . had put back to Toulon.'' --Southey.

{To put forth}. (a) To shoot, bud, or germinate. ``Take earth from under walls where nettles put forth.'' --Bacon. (b) To leave a port or haven, as a ship. --Shak.

{To put in} (Naut.), to enter a harbor; to sail into port.

{To put in for}. (a) To make a request or claim; as, to put in for a share of profits. (b) To go into covert; -- said of a bird escaping from a hawk. (c) To offer one's self; to stand as a candidate for. --Locke.

{To put off}, to go away; to depart; esp., to leave land, as a ship; to move from the shore.

{To put on}, to hasten motion; to drive vehemently.

{To put over} (Naut.), to sail over or across.

{To put to sea} (Naut.), to set sail; to begin a voyage; to advance into the ocean.

{To put up}. (a) To take lodgings; to lodge. (b) To offer one's self as a candidate. --L'Estrange.

{To put up to}, to advance to. [Obs.] ``With this he put up to my lord.'' --Swift.

{To put up with}. (a) To overlook, or suffer without recompense, punishment, or resentment; as, to put up with an injury or affront. (b) To take without opposition or expressed dissatisfaction; to endure; as, to put up with bad fare. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To put in — Put Put, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Put}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Putting}.] [AS. potian to thrust: cf. Dan. putte to put, to put into, Fries. putje; perh. akin to W. pwtio to butt, poke, thrust; cf. also Gael. put to push, thrust, and E. potter, v. i.] 1. To …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put in for — Put Put (put; often p[u^]t in def. 3), v. i. 1. To go or move; as, when the air first puts up. [Obs.] Bacon. [1913 Webster] 2. To steer; to direct one s course; to go. [1913 Webster] His fury thus appeased, he puts to land. Dryden. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put in possession — Possession Pos*ses sion, n. [F. possession, L. possessio.] 1. The act or state of possessing, or holding as one s own. [1913 Webster] 2. (Law) The having, holding, or detention of property in one s power or command; actual seizin or occupancy;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put in mind — Mind Mind (m[imac]nd), n. [AS. mynd, gemynd; akin to OHG. minna memory, love, G. minne love, Dan. minde mind, memory, remembrance, consent, vote, Sw. minne memory, Icel. minni, Goth. gamunds, L. mens, mentis, mind, Gr. me nos, Skr. manas mind,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put in one's oar — Oar Oar ([=o]r), n [AS. [=a]r; akin to Icel. [=a]r, Dan. aare, Sw. [*a]ra; perh. akin to E. row, v. Cf. {Rowlock}.] [1913 Webster] 1. An implement for impelling a boat, being a slender piece of timber, usually ash or spruce, with a grip or handle …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put in pledge — Pledge Pledge, n. [OF. plege, pleige, pledge, guaranty, LL. plegium, plivium; akin to OF. plevir to bail, guaranty, perhaps fr. L. praebere to proffer, offer (sc. fidem a trust, a promise of security), but cf. also E. play. [root]28. Cf.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put in an appearance — Appearance Ap*pear ance, n. [F. apparence, L. apparentia, fr. apparere. See {Appear}.] 1. The act of appearing or coming into sight; the act of becoming visible to the eye; as, his sudden appearance surprised me. [1913 Webster] 2. A thing seed; a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To set in — Set Set (s[e^]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Set}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Setting}.] [OE. setten, AS. setton; akin to OS. settian, OFries. setta, D. zetten, OHG. sezzen, G. setzen, Icel. setja, Sw. s[ a]tta, Dan. s?tte, Goth. satjan; causative from the root… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To lay in — Lay Lay (l[=a]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Laid} (l[=a]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Laying}.] [OE. leggen, AS. lecgan, causative, fr. licgan to lie; akin to D. leggen, G. legen, Icel. leggja, Goth. lagjan. See {Lie} to be prostrate.] 1. To cause to lie down,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To turn in — Turn Turn (t[^u]rn), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Turned}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Turning}.] [OE. turnen, tournen, OF. tourner, torner, turner, F. tourner, LL. tornare, fr. L. tornare to turn in a lathe, to rounds off, fr. tornus a lathe, Gr. ? a turner s… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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