To put on
Put Put (put; often p[u^]t in def. 3), v. i. 1. To go or move; as, when the air first puts up. [Obs.] --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

2. To steer; to direct one's course; to go. [1913 Webster]

His fury thus appeased, he puts to land. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

3. To play a card or a hand in the game called put. [1913 Webster]

{To put about} (Naut.), to change direction; to tack.

{To put back} (Naut.), to turn back; to return. ``The French . . . had put back to Toulon.'' --Southey.

{To put forth}. (a) To shoot, bud, or germinate. ``Take earth from under walls where nettles put forth.'' --Bacon. (b) To leave a port or haven, as a ship. --Shak.

{To put in} (Naut.), to enter a harbor; to sail into port.

{To put in for}. (a) To make a request or claim; as, to put in for a share of profits. (b) To go into covert; -- said of a bird escaping from a hawk. (c) To offer one's self; to stand as a candidate for. --Locke.

{To put off}, to go away; to depart; esp., to leave land, as a ship; to move from the shore.

{To put on}, to hasten motion; to drive vehemently.

{To put over} (Naut.), to sail over or across.

{To put to sea} (Naut.), to set sail; to begin a voyage; to advance into the ocean.

{To put up}. (a) To take lodgings; to lodge. (b) To offer one's self as a candidate. --L'Estrange.

{To put up to}, to advance to. [Obs.] ``With this he put up to my lord.'' --Swift.

{To put up with}. (a) To overlook, or suffer without recompense, punishment, or resentment; as, to put up with an injury or affront. (b) To take without opposition or expressed dissatisfaction; to endure; as, to put up with bad fare. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To put on — Put Put, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Put}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Putting}.] [AS. potian to thrust: cf. Dan. putte to put, to put into, Fries. putje; perh. akin to W. pwtio to butt, poke, thrust; cf. also Gael. put to push, thrust, and E. potter, v. i.] 1. To …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put on one's trumps — Trump Trump, n. [A corruption of triumph, F. triomphe. See {Triumph}, and cf. {Trump} a trumpet.] 1. A winning card; one of a particular suit (usually determined by chance for each deal) any card of which takes any card of the other suits. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To throw on — Throw Throw, v. t. [imp. {Threw} (thr[udd]); p. p. {Thrown} (thr[=o]n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Throwing}.] [OE. [thorn]rowen, [thorn]rawen, to throw, to twist, AS. [thorn]r[=a]wan to twist, to whirl; akin to D. draaijen, G. drehen, OHG. dr[=a]jan, L.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To try on — Try Try, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {tried}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Trying}.] [OE. trien to select, pick out, F. trier to cull, to out, LL. tritare to triturate (hence the sense of, to thresh, to separate the grain from the straw, to select), L. terere,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To gird on — Gird Gird (g[ e]rd), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Girt}or {Girded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Girding}.] [OE. girden, gurden, AS. gyrdan; akin to OS. gurdian, D. gorden, OHG. gurten, G. g[ u]rten, Icel. gyr[eth]a, Sw. gjorda, Dan. giorde, Goth. biga[ i]rdan to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To crack on — Crack Crack (kr[a^]k), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cracked} (kr[a^]kt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Cracking}.] [OE. cracken, craken, to crack, break, boast, AS. cracian, cearcian, to crack; akin to D. kraken, G. krachen; cf. Skr. garj to rattle, or perh. of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To slip on — Slip Slip, v. t. 1. To cause to move smoothly and quickly; to slide; to convey gently or secretly. [1913 Webster] He tried to slip a powder into her drink. Arbuthnot. [1913 Webster] 2. To omit; to loose by negligence. [1913 Webster] And slip no… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To set on — Set Set (s[e^]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Set}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Setting}.] [OE. setten, AS. setton; akin to OS. settian, OFries. setta, D. zetten, OHG. sezzen, G. setzen, Icel. setja, Sw. s[ a]tta, Dan. s?tte, Goth. satjan; causative from the root… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To lay on — Lay Lay (l[=a]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Laid} (l[=a]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Laying}.] [OE. leggen, AS. lecgan, causative, fr. licgan to lie; akin to D. leggen, G. legen, Icel. leggja, Goth. lagjan. See {Lie} to be prostrate.] 1. To cause to lie down,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To stand on — Stand Stand (st[a^]nd), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Stood} (st[oo^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Standing}.] [OE. standen; AS. standan; akin to OFries. stonda, st[=a]n, D. staan, OS. standan, st[=a]n, OHG. stantan, st[=a]n, G. stehen, Icel. standa, Dan. staae,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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