to speak
Open O"pen v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Opened}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Opening}.] [AS. openian. See {Open},a.] 1. To make or set open; to render free of access; to unclose; to unbar; to unlock; to remove any fastening or covering from; as, to open a door; to open a box; to open a room; to open a letter. [1913 Webster]

And all the windows of my heart I open to the day. --Whittier. [1913 Webster]

2. To spread; to expand; as, to open the hand. [1913 Webster]

3. To disclose; to reveal; to interpret; to explain. [1913 Webster]

The king opened himself to some of his council, that he was sorry for the earl's death. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

Unto thee have I opened my cause. --Jer. xx. 12. [1913 Webster]

While he opened to us the Scriptures. --Luke xxiv. 32. [1913 Webster]

4. To make known; to discover; also, to render available or accessible for settlements, trade, etc. [1913 Webster]

The English did adventure far for to open the North parts of America. --Abp. Abbot. [1913 Webster]

5. To enter upon; to begin; as, to open a discussion; to open fire upon an enemy; to open trade, or correspondence; to open an investigation; to open a case in court, or a meeting. [1913 Webster]

6. To loosen or make less compact; as, to open matted cotton by separating the fibers. [1913 Webster]

{To open one's mouth}, {to speak}.

{To open up}, to lay open; to discover; to disclose. [1913 Webster]

Poetry that had opened up so many delightful views into the character and condition of our ``bold peasantry, their country's pride.'' --Prof. Wilson. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To speak of — Speak Speak, v. i. [imp. {Spoke}({Spake}Archaic); p. p. {Spoken}({Spoke}, Obs. or Colloq.); p. pr. & vb. n. {Speaking}.] [OE. speken, AS. specan, sprecan; akin to OF.ries. spreka, D. spreken, OS. spreken, G. sprechen, OHG. sprehhan, and perhaps… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To speak out — Speak Speak, v. i. [imp. {Spoke}({Spake}Archaic); p. p. {Spoken}({Spoke}, Obs. or Colloq.); p. pr. & vb. n. {Speaking}.] [OE. speken, AS. specan, sprecan; akin to OF.ries. spreka, D. spreken, OS. spreken, G. sprechen, OHG. sprehhan, and perhaps… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To speak well for — Speak Speak, v. i. [imp. {Spoke}({Spake}Archaic); p. p. {Spoken}({Spoke}, Obs. or Colloq.); p. pr. & vb. n. {Speaking}.] [OE. speken, AS. specan, sprecan; akin to OF.ries. spreka, D. spreken, OS. spreken, G. sprechen, OHG. sprehhan, and perhaps… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To speak with — Speak Speak, v. i. [imp. {Spoke}({Spake}Archaic); p. p. {Spoken}({Spoke}, Obs. or Colloq.); p. pr. & vb. n. {Speaking}.] [OE. speken, AS. specan, sprecan; akin to OF.ries. spreka, D. spreken, OS. spreken, G. sprechen, OHG. sprehhan, and perhaps… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To speak a ship — Speak Speak, v. t. 1. To utter with the mouth; to pronounce; to utter articulately, as human beings. [1913 Webster] They sat down with him upn ground seven days and seven nights, and none spake a word unto him. Job. ii. 13. [1913 Webster] 2. To… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To speak for Buncombe — Buncombe Bun combe, Bunkum Bun kum, n. [Buncombe a county of North Carolina.] Speech making for the gratification of constituents, or to gain public applause; flattering talk for a selfish purpose; anything said for mere show. [Cant or Slang, U.S …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • to speak of — {adj. phr.}, {informal} Important; worth talking about; worth noticing. Usually used in negative sentences. * /Did it rain yesterday? Not to speak of./ * /What happened at the meeting? Nothing to speak of./ * /Judy s injuries were nothing to… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • to speak of — {adj. phr.}, {informal} Important; worth talking about; worth noticing. Usually used in negative sentences. * /Did it rain yesterday? Not to speak of./ * /What happened at the meeting? Nothing to speak of./ * /Judy s injuries were nothing to… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • To speak by the book — Book Book (b[oo^]k), n. [OE. book, bok, AS. b[=o]c; akin to Goth. b[=o]ka a letter, in pl. book, writing, Icel. b[=o]k, Sw. bok, Dan. bog, OS. b[=o]k, D. boek, OHG. puoh, G. buch; and fr. AS. b[=o]c, b[=e]ce, beech; because the ancient Saxons and …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To speak by the card — Card Card (k[aum]rd), n. [F. carte, fr. L. charta paper, Gr. ? a leaf of paper. Cf. {Chart}.] 1. A piece of pasteboard, or thick paper, blank or prepared for various uses; as, a playing card; a visiting card; a card of invitation; pl. a game… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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