Uncaught third strike


Uncaught third strike

In baseball, an uncaught third strike (often inaccurately referred to as a dropped third strike) occurs when the catcher fails to cleanly catch a pitch for the third strike. A pitch is considered uncaught if the ball touches the ground before being caught, or if the ball is dropped after being grasped (see also catch). In Major League Baseball, the specific rules concerning the uncaught third strike are addressed in Rules 6.05 and 6.09 of the Official Baseball Rules.[1]

On an uncaught third strike with no runner on first base or with two outs, the batter immediately becomes a runner. The strike is called, but the umpire does not call the batter out. The umpire may also actively signal that there is "no catch" of the pitch. The batter may then attempt to reach first base and must be tagged or thrown out. With two outs and the bases loaded, the catcher who fails to catch the third strike may, upon picking up the ball, step on home plate for a force-out or make a throw to any other fielder.

One intent of this rule is to ensure that a defensive player fields the ball cleanly in order for that team to record an out. It was thought that it was not enough that the offensive player be unsuccessful at the plate in order for an out to be made; a defensive player must be successful as well.

Regardless of the outcome of an uncaught third strike, the pitcher is statistically credited with a strikeout. Because of the uncaught third strike rule, it is possible for a pitcher to register more than three strikeouts in an inning, a feat which has been accomplished in Major League Baseball 56 times.[2][3]

If at the time of the strike three pitch, first base is occupied with fewer than two outs, the batter is automatically out and cannot become a runner. This is to prevent the defense from deliberately dropping a third strike pitch and getting a double or triple play as a result, because of the possible force play at second, third base, or home plate in this situation.

In Little League divisions Tee-Ball, Minor League, and Little League (or the Major Division) the batter is out after the third strike regardless of whether the pitched ball is caught cleanly by the catcher. In Junior, Senior, and Big League divisions a batter may attempt to advance to first base on an uncaught third strike. Little League Major Division Softball as well as many other youth baseball leagues, such as the USSSA also follow the rule.

Recent changes

Following a controversial play involving this rule in the ninth inning of Game 2 of the 2005 American League Championship Series,[4] the application of the rule was changed when a comment was added in 2006 to Rule 6.09(b):[5]

Rule 6.09(b) Comment: A batter who does not realize his situation on a third strike not caught, and who is not in the process of running to first base, shall be declared out once he leaves the dirt circle surrounding home plate."[1]

This comment represents the official interpretation of the application of the rule. Previous to this rule change, a batter was able to try for first at any time before entering the dugout.

On May 17, 2011, Miguel Cairo advanced to first after leaving the dirt circle when the umpires forgot about Rule 6.09(b) [6]

References


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Uncaught Third Strike — Der Uncaught Third Strike (deutsch: Nicht gefangener dritter Strike) ist ein Fachbegriff aus dem Baseball. Häufig wird auch vom Dropped Third Strike gesprochen, dies ist jedoch eine regeltechnisch und sprachlich ungenaue Bezeichnung.… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Uncaught third strike — Der Uncaught Third Strike (deutsch: Nicht gefangener dritter Strike) ist ein Fachbegriff aus dem Baseball. Häufig wird auch vom Dropped Third Strike gesprochen, dies ist jedoch eine regeltechnisch und sprachlich ungenaue Bezeichnung.… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Dropped third strike — Der Uncaught Third Strike (deutsch: Nicht gefangener dritter Strike) ist ein Fachbegriff aus dem Baseball. Häufig wird auch vom Dropped Third Strike gesprochen, dies ist jedoch eine regeltechnisch und sprachlich ungenaue Bezeichnung.… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Strike zone — In baseball, the strike zone is a conceptual three dimensional right angle pentagonal over home plate which defines the boundaries through which a pitch must pass in order to count as a strike when the batter does not swing. Other uses of strike… …   Wikipedia

  • Stolen base — The all time stolen base leader, Rickey Henderson, swipes third in 1988. In baseball, a stolen base occurs when a baserunner successfully advances to the next base while the pitcher is delivering the ball to home plate. In baseball statistics,… …   Wikipedia

  • 2005 American League Championship Series — Infobox LCS alcs = yes year = 2005 champion = Chicago White Sox (4) champion manager = Ozzie Guillén champion games = 99 63, .611, GA: 6 runnerup = Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (1) runnerup manager = Mike Scioscia runnerup games = 95 67, .586,… …   Wikipedia

  • Baseball rules — The rules of baseball differ slightly from league to league, but in general share the same basic gameplay. Contents 1 Codes 2 Differences and evolution 3 Gameplay 3.1 General structure …   Wikipedia

  • Double play — This article is about the baseball play. For double play magnetic tape, see audio tape length and thickness. For the jazz album, see Double Play!. After stepping on second base, the fielder throws to first to complete a double play In baseball, a …   Wikipedia

  • Bunt (baseball) — A Little League baseball player squares around to bunt. A bunt is a special type of offensive technique in baseball or fastpitch softball. In a bunt play, the batter loosely holds the bat in front of the plate and intentionally taps the ball into …   Wikipedia

  • Balls and strikes (baseball) — In baseball, the strike zone is a conceptual three dimensional right angle pentagonal over home plate which defines the boundaries through which a pitch must pass in order to count as a strike when the batter does not swing. DefinitionA batter… …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.