Magazine


Magazine

Magazines, periodicals, glossies or serials are publications, generally published on a regular schedule, containing a variety of articles. They are generally financed by advertising, by a purchase price, by pre-paid magazine subscriptions, or all three.

Contents

Distribution

Magazines can be distributed through the mail; through sales by newsstands, bookstores or other vendors; or through free distribution at selected pick-up locations. Sales models for distribution fall into three main categories.

In this model, the magazine is sold to readers for a price, either on a per-issue basis or by subscription, where an annual fee or monthly price is paid and issues are sent by post to readers. Examples from the UK include Private Eye and PC Pro.

Free circulation

This means that there is no cover price and issues are given away, for example in street dispensers, airline in-flight magazines or included with other products or publications. An example from the UK and Australia is TNT Magazine.

Controlled circulation

This is the model used by "insider magazines" or industry-based publications distributed only to qualifying readers, often for free and determined by some form of survey. This latter model was widely used before the rise of the World Wide Web and is still employed by some titles. For example, in the United Kingdom, a number of computer-industry magazines, including Computer Weekly and Computing, and in finance, Waters Magazine.

Technical definition

In the library technical sense a "magazine" paginates with each issue starting at page one.[1] Academic or professional publications that are not peer-reviewed are generally professional magazines.[2]

History

The Gentleman's Magazine, first published in 1731, in London, is considered to have been the first general-interest magazine. Edward Cave, who edited The Gentleman's Magazine under the pen name "Sylvanus Urban", was the first to use the term "magazine", on the analogy of a military storehouse of varied materiel, originally derived from the Arabic makhazin "storehouses".[3]

The oldest consumer magazine still in print is The Scots Magazine, which was first published in 1739, though multiple changes in ownership and gaps in publication totaling over 90 years weaken that claim. Lloyd's List was founded in Edward Lloyd’s England coffee shop in 1734; it is still published as a daily business newspaper.

See also

Lists
Categories
  • Periodicals
  • Religious magazines
  • Satirical magazines
  • Wildlife magazines

References

  1. ^ Likewise, in the technical sense a "journal" has continuous pagination throughout a volume. Thus Business Week, which starts each issue anew with page one, is a magazine, but the Journal of Business Communication, which starts each volume with the winter issue and continues the same sequence of pagination throughout the coterminous year, is a journal. Some professional or trade publications are also peer reviewed, an example being the Journal of Accountancy. See Magazine (firearms) for another sense in which the word "magazine" refers to serialized unitary behavior. Cf. the French Wikipedia's disambiguation of various meanings of the cognate magasin.
  2. ^ The fact that a publication calls itself a "journal" does not make it a journal in the technical sense. The Journal of Accountancy, for example, is in fact a magazine (each issue starts with page one). The Wall Street Journal is actually a newspaper.
  3. ^ OED, s.v. "Magazine".

External links


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Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • magazine — [ magazin ] n. m. • 1776 n. f.; mot angl., du fr. magasin 1 ♦ Publication périodique, généralement illustrée. ⇒ journal, revue; fanzine. Magazine féminin. Magazine hebdomadaire, mensuel. Feuilleter des magazines. Une pile de vieux magazines. 2 ♦… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • magazine — mag‧a‧zine [ˌmægəˈziːn ǁ ˈmægəziːn] noun [countable] a large thin book containing news, articles, photographs etc which is produced weekly or monthly: • The magazine has a weekly circulation (= the number of copies sold ) of four million. • the… …   Financial and business terms

  • Magazine — Говард Девото Основная информация …   Википедия

  • Magazine Z — Categories Seinen manga Frequency monthly First issue June 26, 1999 Final issue January 26, 2009 Company Kodansha Country Japan …   Wikipedia

  • Magazine — Mag a*zine , n. [F. magasin, It. magazzino, or Sp. magacen, almagacen; all fr. Ar. makhzan, almakhzan, a storehouse, granary, or cellar.] [1913 Webster] 1. A receptacle in which anything is stored, especially military stores, as ammunition, arms …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Magazine 60 — est un groupe français fondé en 1981 par Jean Luc Drion, producteur indépendant. Yves, Marc et Danielle Delval,Jean Luc Drion et Alain Dernoncourt en seront les chanteurs. Jean Luc Drion, auteur compositeur et arrangeur déjà reconnu dans le… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Magazine 60 — Origin Lille, France Genres New Wave, Synthpop, Euro disco Years active 1981 1992 Labels Barclay, Columbia …   Wikipedia

  • Magazine — Magazine, AR U.S. city in Arkansas Population (2000): 915 Housing Units (2000): 394 Land area (2000): 1.664934 sq. miles (4.312159 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 1.664934 sq. miles (4.312159 sq …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Magazine, AR — U.S. city in Arkansas Population (2000): 915 Housing Units (2000): 394 Land area (2000): 1.664934 sq. miles (4.312159 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 1.664934 sq. miles (4.312159 sq. km) FIPS… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • magazine — (n.) 1580s, place for storing goods, especially military ammunition, from M.Fr. magasin warehouse, depot, store (15c.), from It. magazzino, from Arabic makhazin, pl. of makhzan storehouse (Cf. Sp. almacén warehouse, magazine ), from khazana to… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Magazine — Mag a*zine , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Magazined}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Magazining}.] To store in, or as in, a magazine; to store up for use. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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