Hold
Hold Hold, v. i. In general, to keep one's self in a given position or condition; to remain fixed. Hence: [1913 Webster]

1. Not to move; to halt; to stop; -- mostly in the imperative. [1913 Webster]

And damned be him that first cries, ``Hold, enough!'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. Not to give way; not to part or become separated; to remain unbroken or unsubdued. [1913 Webster]

Our force by land hath nobly held. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. Not to fail or be found wanting; to continue; to last; to endure a test or trial; to abide; to persist. [1913 Webster]

While our obedience holds. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

The rule holds in land as all other commodities. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

4. Not to fall away, desert, or prove recreant; to remain attached; to cleave; -- often with with, to, or for. [1913 Webster]

He will hold to the one and despise the other. --Matt. vi. 24 [1913 Webster]

5. To restrain one's self; to refrain. [1913 Webster]

His dauntless heart would fain have held From weeping, but his eyes rebelled. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

6. To derive right or title; -- generally with of. [1913 Webster]

My crown is absolute, and holds of none. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

His imagination holds immediately from nature. --Hazlitt. [1913 Webster]

{Hold on!} {Hold up!} wait; stop; forbear. [Collog] -- {To hold forth}, to speak in public; to harangue; to preach. --L'Estrange.

{To hold in}, to restrain one's self; as, he wanted to laugh and could hardly hold in.

{To hold off}, to keep at a distance.

{To hold on}, to keep fast hold; to continue; to go on. ``The trade held on for many years,'' --Swift.

{To hold out}, to last; to endure; to continue; to maintain one's self; not to yield or give way.

{To hold over}, to remain in office, possession, etc., beyond a certain date.

{To hold to} or {To hold with}, to take sides with, as a person or opinion.

{To hold together}, to be joined; not to separate; to remain in union. --Dryden. --Locke.

{To hold up}. (a) To support one's self; to remain unbent or unbroken; as, to hold up under misfortunes. (b) To cease raining; to cease to stop; as, it holds up. --Hudibras. (c) To keep up; not to fall behind; not to lose ground. --Collier. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Hold — Hold, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Held}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Holding}. {Holden}, p. p., is obs. in elegant writing, though still used in legal language.] [OE. haldan, D. houden, OHG. hoten, Icel. halda, Dan. holde, Sw. h[*a]lla, Goth. haldan to feed, tend… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hold — hold1 [hōld] vt. held, holding [ME holden < Anglian OE haldan (WS healdan), akin to Ger halten, Goth haldan, to tend sheep < IE base * kel , to drive, incite to action > Gr kelēs, swift horse, L celer, swift: prob. sense development:… …   English World dictionary

  • hold — Ⅰ. hold [1] ► VERB (past and past part. held) 1) grasp, carry, or support. 2) keep or detain. 3) have in one s possession. 4) contain or be capable of containing. 5) have or occupy (a job or position) …   English terms dictionary

  • hold — vb 1 hold back, withhold, reserve, detain, retain, *keep, keep back, keep out Analogous words: *restrain, inhibit, curb, check: preserve, conserve, *save Contrasted words: *relinquish, surrender, abandon, resign, yield 2 …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Hold — (h[=o]ld), n. 1. The act of holding, as in or with the hands or arms; the manner of holding, whether firm or loose; seizure; grasp; clasp; grip; possession; often used with the verbs take and lay. [1913 Webster] Ne have I not twelve pence within… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hold — vt held, hold·ing 1 a: to have lawful possession or ownership of held the property as tenants in common the band hold s the title to the car b: to have as a privilege or position of responsibility hold ing …   Law dictionary

  • Hold — may refer to: * Hold, to delay temporarily the handling of * Hold (ship), interior cargo space * Hold (aviation), a place for an aircraft to loop around near its destination * Hold (baseball), a statistic that may be awarded to a relief pitcher * …   Wikipedia

  • hold — [n] grasp, possession authority, clasp, clench, clinch, clout, clutch, control, dominance, dominion, grip, influence, occupancy, occupation, ownership, pull, purchase, retention, sway, tenacity, tenure; concepts 190,343,710 Ant. dispossession,… …   New thesaurus

  • Hold — ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Alexander Hold (* 1962), deutscher Richter und Fernsehschauspieler Carl Hold (1871–1946), deutscher Politiker und Industrieller Hans Hold (1826 1910), Schweizer Politiker (FDP Liberale) und Militär… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Hold — Hold, er, este, adj. et adv. 1) Geneigt, des andern Glück gern zu sehen, Liebe gegen denselben empfindend, ohne Unterschied des Standes; nur in Gestalt eines Nebenwortes. Der Herr wird den Demüthigen hold seyn, Sir. 3, 20. Mosen waren beyde Gott… …   Grammatisch-kritisches Wörterbuch der Hochdeutschen Mundart

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”