To keep up
Keep Keep, v. i. 1. To remain in any position or state; to continue; to abide; to stay; as, to keep at a distance; to keep aloft; to keep near; to keep in the house; to keep before or behind; to keep in favor; to keep out of company, or out reach. [1913 Webster]

2. To last; to endure; to remain unimpaired. [1913 Webster]

If the malt be not thoroughly dried, the ale it makes will not keep. --Mortimer. [1913 Webster]

3. To reside for a time; to lodge; to dwell. [Now disused except locally or colloquially.] [1913 Webster]

Knock at his study, where, they say, he keeps. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

4. To take care; to be solicitous; to watch. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Keep that the lusts choke not the word of God that is in us. --Tyndale. [1913 Webster]

5. To be in session; as, school keeps to-day. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster]

{To keep from}, to abstain or refrain from.

{To keep in with}, to keep on good terms with; as, to keep in with an opponent.

{To keep on}, to go forward; to proceed; to continue to advance.

{To keep to}, to adhere strictly to; not to neglect or deviate from; as, to keep to old customs; to keep to a rule; to keep to one's word or promise.

{To keep up}, to remain unsubdued; also, not to be confined to one's bed. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To keep up — Keep Keep (k[=e]p), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Kept} (k[e^]pt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Keeping}.] [OE. k[=e]pen, AS. c[=e]pan to keep, regard, desire, await, take, betake; cf. AS. copenere lover, OE. copnien to desire.] 1. To care; to desire. [Obs.] [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To keep up — «заменить строчную прописной» (указание в корректуре) …   Краткий толковый словарь по полиграфии

  • To hold up — Hold Hold, v. i. In general, to keep one s self in a given position or condition; to remain fixed. Hence: [1913 Webster] 1. Not to move; to halt; to stop; mostly in the imperative. [1913 Webster] And damned be him that first cries, Hold, enough!… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To follow up — Follow Fol low, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Followed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Following}.][OE. foluwen, folwen, folgen, AS. folgian, fylgean, fylgan; akin to D. volgen, OHG. folg[=e]n, G. folgen, Icel. fylgja, Sw. f[ o]lja, Dan. f[ o]lge, and perh. to E. folk …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take up — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To hold up — Hold Hold, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Held}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Holding}. {Holden}, p. p., is obs. in elegant writing, though still used in legal language.] [OE. haldan, D. houden, OHG. hoten, Icel. halda, Dan. holde, Sw. h[*a]lla, Goth. haldan to feed,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To bear up — Bear Bear (b[^a]r), v. t. [imp. {Bore} (b[=o]r) (formerly {Bare} (b[^a]r)); p. p. {Born} (b[^o]rn), {Borne} (b[=o]rn); p. pr. & vb. n. {Bearing}.] [OE. beren, AS. beran, beoran, to bear, carry, produce; akin to D. baren to bring forth, G. geb[… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To stand up — Stand Stand (st[a^]nd), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Stood} (st[oo^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Standing}.] [OE. standen; AS. standan; akin to OFries. stonda, st[=a]n, D. staan, OS. standan, st[=a]n, OHG. stantan, st[=a]n, G. stehen, Icel. standa, Dan. staae,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To work up — Work Work (w[^u]rk), v. t. 1. To labor or operate upon; to give exertion and effort to; to prepare for use, or to utilize, by labor. [1913 Webster] He could have told them of two or three gold mines, and a silver mine, and given the reason why… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put up — Put Put, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Put}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Putting}.] [AS. potian to thrust: cf. Dan. putte to put, to put into, Fries. putje; perh. akin to W. pwtio to butt, poke, thrust; cf. also Gael. put to push, thrust, and E. potter, v. i.] 1. To …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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