To speak with
Speak Speak, v. i. [imp. {Spoke}({Spake}Archaic); p. p. {Spoken}({Spoke}, Obs. or Colloq.); p. pr. & vb. n. {Speaking}.] [OE. speken, AS. specan, sprecan; akin to OF.ries. spreka, D. spreken, OS. spreken, G. sprechen, OHG. sprehhan, and perhaps to Skr. sph[=u]rj to crackle, to thunder. Cf. {Spark} of fire, {Speech}.] 1. To utter words or articulate sounds, as human beings; to express thoughts by words; as, the organs may be so obstructed that a man may not be able to speak. [1913 Webster]

Till at the last spake in this manner. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

Speak, Lord; for thy servant heareth. --1 Sam. iii. 9. [1913 Webster]

2. To express opinions; to say; to talk; to converse. [1913 Webster]

That fluid substance in a few minutes begins to set, as the tradesmen speak. --Boyle. [1913 Webster]

An honest man, is able to speak for himself, when a knave is not. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

During the century and a half which followed the Conquest, there is, to speak strictly, no English history. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

3. To utter a speech, discourse, or harangue; to adress a public assembly formally. [1913 Webster]

Many of the nobility made themselves popular by speaking in Parliament against those things which were most grateful to his majesty. --Clarendon. [1913 Webster]

4. To discourse; to make mention; to tell. [1913 Webster]

Lycan speaks of a part of C[ae]sar's army that came to him from the Leman Lake. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

5. To give sound; to sound. [1913 Webster]

Make all our trumpets speak. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

6. To convey sentiments, ideas, or intelligence as if by utterance; as, features that speak of self-will. [1913 Webster]

Thine eye begins to speak. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{To speak of}, to take account of, to make mention of. --Robynson (More's Utopia).

{To speak out}, to speak loudly and distinctly; also, to speak unreservedly.

{To speak well for}, to commend; to be favorable to.

{To speak with}, to converse with. ``Would you speak with me?'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To say; tell; talk; converse; discourse; articulate; pronounce; utter. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To break with — Break Break (br[=a]k), v. i. 1. To come apart or divide into two or more pieces, usually with suddenness and violence; to part; to burst asunder. [1913 Webster] 2. To open spontaneously, or by pressure from within, as a bubble, a tumor, a seed… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To go with — Go Go, v. i. [imp. {Went} (w[e^]nt); p. p. {Gone} (g[o^]n; 115); p. pr. & vb. n. {Going}. Went comes from the AS, wendan. See {Wend}, v. i.] [OE. gan, gon, AS. g[=a]n, akin to D. gaan, G. gehn, gehen, OHG. g[=e]n, g[=a]n, SW. g[*a], Dan. gaae; cf …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To run with — Run Run, v. i. [imp. {Ran}or {Run}; p. p. {Run}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Running}.] [OE. rinnen, rennen (imp. ran, p. p. runnen, ronnen). AS. rinnan to flow (imp. ran, p. p. gerunnen), and iernan, irnan, to run (imp. orn, arn, earn, p. p. urnen); akin… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To stand with — Stand Stand (st[a^]nd), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Stood} (st[oo^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Standing}.] [OE. standen; AS. standan; akin to OFries. stonda, st[=a]n, D. staan, OS. standan, st[=a]n, OHG. stantan, st[=a]n, G. stehen, Icel. standa, Dan. staae,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To hold with — Hold Hold, v. i. In general, to keep one s self in a given position or condition; to remain fixed. Hence: [1913 Webster] 1. Not to move; to halt; to stop; mostly in the imperative. [1913 Webster] And damned be him that first cries, Hold, enough!… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To speak of — Speak Speak, v. i. [imp. {Spoke}({Spake}Archaic); p. p. {Spoken}({Spoke}, Obs. or Colloq.); p. pr. & vb. n. {Speaking}.] [OE. speken, AS. specan, sprecan; akin to OF.ries. spreka, D. spreken, OS. spreken, G. sprechen, OHG. sprehhan, and perhaps… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To speak out — Speak Speak, v. i. [imp. {Spoke}({Spake}Archaic); p. p. {Spoken}({Spoke}, Obs. or Colloq.); p. pr. & vb. n. {Speaking}.] [OE. speken, AS. specan, sprecan; akin to OF.ries. spreka, D. spreken, OS. spreken, G. sprechen, OHG. sprehhan, and perhaps… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To speak well for — Speak Speak, v. i. [imp. {Spoke}({Spake}Archaic); p. p. {Spoken}({Spoke}, Obs. or Colloq.); p. pr. & vb. n. {Speaking}.] [OE. speken, AS. specan, sprecan; akin to OF.ries. spreka, D. spreken, OS. spreken, G. sprechen, OHG. sprehhan, and perhaps… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To Sir, with Love — For other uses, see To Sir, with Love (disambiguation). To Sir, With Love VHS cover Directed by James Clavell …   Wikipedia

  • To speak by the book — Book Book (b[oo^]k), n. [OE. book, bok, AS. b[=o]c; akin to Goth. b[=o]ka a letter, in pl. book, writing, Icel. b[=o]k, Sw. bok, Dan. bog, OS. b[=o]k, D. boek, OHG. puoh, G. buch; and fr. AS. b[=o]c, b[=e]ce, beech; because the ancient Saxons and …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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