To back up
Back Back (b[a^]k), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Backed} (b[a^]kt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Backing}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To get upon the back of; to mount. [1913 Webster]

I will back him [a horse] straight. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. To place or seat upon the back. [R.] [1913 Webster]

Great Jupiter, upon his eagle backed, Appeared to me. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. To drive or force backward; to cause to retreat or recede; as, to back oxen. [1913 Webster]

4. To make a back for; to furnish with a back; as, to back books. [1913 Webster]

5. To adjoin behind; to be at the back of. [1913 Webster]

A garden . . . with a vineyard backed. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

The chalk cliffs which back the beach. --Huxley. [1913 Webster]

6. To write upon the back of; as, to back a letter; to indorse; as, to back a note or legal document. [1913 Webster]

7. To support; to maintain; to second or strengthen by aid or influence; as, to back a friend. ``The Parliament would be backed by the people.'' --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

Have still found it necessary to back and fortify their laws with rewards and punishments. --South. [1913 Webster]

The mate backed the captain manfully. --Blackw. Mag. [1913 Webster]

8. To bet on the success of; -- as, to back a race horse. [1913 Webster]

{To back an anchor} (Naut.), to lay down a small anchor ahead of a large one, the cable of the small one being fastened to the crown of the large one.

{To back the field}, in horse racing, to bet against a particular horse or horses, that some one of all the other horses, collectively designated ``the field'', will win.

{To back the oars}, to row backward with the oars.

{To back a rope}, to put on a preventer.

{To back the sails}, to arrange them so as to cause the ship to move astern.

{To back up}, to support; to sustain; as, to back up one's friends.

{To back a warrant} (Law), is for a justice of the peace, in the county where the warrant is to be executed, to sign or indorse a warrant, issued in another county, to apprehend an offender.

{To back water} (Naut.), to reverse the action of the oars, paddles, or propeller, so as to force the boat or ship backward. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To blow up — Up Up ([u^]p), adv. [AS. up, upp, [=u]p; akin to OFries. up, op, D. op, OS. [=u]p, OHG. [=u]f, G. auf, Icel. & Sw. upp, Dan. op, Goth. iup, and probably to E. over. See {Over}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Aloft; on high; in a direction contrary to that of …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To bring up — Up Up ([u^]p), adv. [AS. up, upp, [=u]p; akin to OFries. up, op, D. op, OS. [=u]p, OHG. [=u]f, G. auf, Icel. & Sw. upp, Dan. op, Goth. iup, and probably to E. over. See {Over}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Aloft; on high; in a direction contrary to that of …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To cut up — Up Up ([u^]p), adv. [AS. up, upp, [=u]p; akin to OFries. up, op, D. op, OS. [=u]p, OHG. [=u]f, G. auf, Icel. & Sw. upp, Dan. op, Goth. iup, and probably to E. over. See {Over}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Aloft; on high; in a direction contrary to that of …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To draw up — Up Up ([u^]p), adv. [AS. up, upp, [=u]p; akin to OFries. up, op, D. op, OS. [=u]p, OHG. [=u]f, G. auf, Icel. & Sw. upp, Dan. op, Goth. iup, and probably to E. over. See {Over}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Aloft; on high; in a direction contrary to that of …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To grow up — Up Up ([u^]p), adv. [AS. up, upp, [=u]p; akin to OFries. up, op, D. op, OS. [=u]p, OHG. [=u]f, G. auf, Icel. & Sw. upp, Dan. op, Goth. iup, and probably to E. over. See {Over}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Aloft; on high; in a direction contrary to that of …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To turn up — Turn Turn (t[^u]rn), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Turned}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Turning}.] [OE. turnen, tournen, OF. tourner, torner, turner, F. tourner, LL. tornare, fr. L. tornare to turn in a lathe, to rounds off, fr. tornus a lathe, Gr. ? a turner s… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To keep up — Keep Keep (k[=e]p), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Kept} (k[e^]pt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Keeping}.] [OE. k[=e]pen, AS. c[=e]pan to keep, regard, desire, await, take, betake; cf. AS. copenere lover, OE. copnien to desire.] 1. To care; to desire. [Obs.] [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put up — Put Put (put; often p[u^]t in def. 3), v. i. 1. To go or move; as, when the air first puts up. [Obs.] Bacon. [1913 Webster] 2. To steer; to direct one s course; to go. [1913 Webster] His fury thus appeased, he puts to land. Dryden. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put up — Put Put, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Put}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Putting}.] [AS. potian to thrust: cf. Dan. putte to put, to put into, Fries. putje; perh. akin to W. pwtio to butt, poke, thrust; cf. also Gael. put to push, thrust, and E. potter, v. i.] 1. To …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To break up — Break Break (br[=a]k), v. t. [imp. {broke} (br[=o]k), (Obs. {Brake}); p. p. {Broken} (br[=o] k n), (Obs. {Broke}); p. pr. & vb. n. {Breaking}.] [OE. breken, AS. brecan; akin to OS. brekan, D. breken, OHG. brehhan, G. brechen, Icel. braka to creak …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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