Bath brick
Brick Brick (br[i^]k), n. [OE. brik, F. brique; of Ger. origin; cf. AS. brice a breaking, fragment, Prov. E. brique piece, brique de pain, equiv. to AS. hl[=a]fes brice, fr. the root of E. break. See {Break}.] 1. A block or clay tempered with water, sand, etc., molded into a regular form, usually rectangular, and sun-dried, or burnt in a kiln, or in a heap or stack called a clamp. [1913 Webster]

The Assyrians appear to have made much less use of bricks baked in the furnace than the Babylonians. --Layard. [1913 Webster]

2. Bricks, collectively, as designating that kind of material; as, a load of brick; a thousand of brick. [1913 Webster]

Some of Palladio's finest examples are of brick. --Weale. [1913 Webster]

3. Any oblong rectangular mass; as, a brick of maple sugar; a penny brick (of bread). [1913 Webster]

4. A good fellow; a merry person; as, you 're a brick. [Slang] ``He 's a dear little brick.'' --Thackeray. [1913 Webster]

{To have a brick in one's hat}, to be drunk. [Slang] [1913 Webster]

Note: Brick is used adjectively or in combination; as, brick wall; brick clay; brick color; brick red. [1913 Webster]

{Brick clay}, clay suitable for, or used in making, bricks.

{Brick dust}, dust of pounded or broken bricks.

{Brick earth}, clay or earth suitable for, or used in making, bricks.

{Brick loaf}, a loaf of bread somewhat resembling a brick in shape.

{Brick nogging} (Arch.), rough brickwork used to fill in the spaces between the uprights of a wooden partition; brick filling.

{Brick tea}, tea leaves and young shoots, or refuse tea, steamed or mixed with fat, etc., and pressed into the form of bricks. It is used in Northern and Central Asia. --S. W. Williams.

{Brick trimmer} (Arch.), a brick arch under a hearth, usually within the thickness of a wooden floor, to guard against accidents by fire.

{Brick trowel}. See {Trowel}.

{Brick works}, a place where bricks are made.

{Bath brick}. See under {Bath}, a city.

{Pressed brick}, bricks which, before burning, have been subjected to pressure, to free them from the imperfections of shape and texture which are common in molded bricks. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Bath brick — Bath Bath, n. A city in the west of England, resorted to for its hot springs, which has given its name to various objects. [1913 Webster] {Bath brick}, a preparation of calcareous earth, in the form of a brick, used for cleaning knives, polished… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Bath brick — n. 〚after BATH, where first made〛 a brick shaped piece of calcareous earth, used for cleaning polished metal * * * …   Universalium

  • Bath brick — n. [after BATH, where first made] a brick shaped piece of calcareous earth, used for cleaning polished metal …   English World dictionary

  • bath-brick — /bäthˈbrik/ noun A preparation of siliceous silt, manufactured at Bridgwater in the form of blocks and used in cleaning knives ORIGIN: Traditionally said to be named after the first maker, one Bath, or from its resemblance to Bath stone …   Useful english dictionary

  • Bath brick — The bath brick, patented in 1823 by William Champion and John Browne, was a predecessor of the scouring pad used for cleaning and polishing.Bath bricks were made by a number of companies in the town of Bridgwater, England, from fine clay dredged… …   Wikipedia

  • bath brick — noun Usage: usually capitalized 1st B Etymology: from Bath, England : an unfired brick of siliceous material used as a scourer and polisher of metals * * * Bath brick, a preparation of fine sand containing much silica, molded in the form of a… …   Useful english dictionary

  • bath brick — /ˈbaθ brɪk/ (say bahth brik) noun a compacted mass of fine siliceous sand, used for scouring metal. {named after Bath, England} …   Australian English dictionary

  • Brick — (br[i^]k), n. [OE. brik, F. brique; of Ger. origin; cf. AS. brice a breaking, fragment, Prov. E. brique piece, brique de pain, equiv. to AS. hl[=a]fes brice, fr. the root of E. break. See {Break}.] 1. A block or clay tempered with water, sand,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Brick clay — Brick Brick (br[i^]k), n. [OE. brik, F. brique; of Ger. origin; cf. AS. brice a breaking, fragment, Prov. E. brique piece, brique de pain, equiv. to AS. hl[=a]fes brice, fr. the root of E. break. See {Break}.] 1. A block or clay tempered with… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Brick dust — Brick Brick (br[i^]k), n. [OE. brik, F. brique; of Ger. origin; cf. AS. brice a breaking, fragment, Prov. E. brique piece, brique de pain, equiv. to AS. hl[=a]fes brice, fr. the root of E. break. See {Break}.] 1. A block or clay tempered with… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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