Filling
Fill Fill, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Filled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Filling}.] [OE. fillen, fullen, AS. fyllan, fr. full full; akin to D. vullen, G. f["u]llen, Icel. fylla, Sw. fylla, Dan. fylde, Goth. fulljan. See {Full}, a.] 1. To make full; to supply with as much as can be held or contained; to put or pour into, till no more can be received; to occupy the whole capacity of. [1913 Webster]

The rain also filleth the pools. --Ps. lxxxiv. 6. [1913 Webster]

Jesus saith unto them, Fill the waterpots with water. Anf they filled them up to the brim. --John ii. 7. [1913 Webster]

2. To furnish an abudant supply to; to furnish with as mush as is desired or desirable; to occupy the whole of; to swarm in or overrun. [1913 Webster]

And God blessed them, saying. Be fruitful, and multiply, and fill the waters in the seas. --Gen. i. 22. [1913 Webster]

The Syrians filled the country. --1 Kings xx. 27. [1913 Webster]

3. To fill or supply fully with food; to feed; to satisfy. [1913 Webster]

Whence should we have so much bread in the wilderness, as to fillso great a multitude? --Matt. xv. 33. [1913 Webster]

Things that are sweet and fat are more filling. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

4. To possess and perform the duties of; to officiate in, as an incumbent; to occupy; to hold; as, a king fills a throne; the president fills the office of chief magistrate; the speaker of the House fills the chair. [1913 Webster]

5. To supply with an incumbent; as, to fill an office or a vacancy. --A. Hamilton. [1913 Webster]

6. (Naut.) (a) To press and dilate, as a sail; as, the wind filled the sails. (b) To trim (a yard) so that the wind shall blow on the after side of the sails. [1913 Webster]

7. (Civil Engineering) To make an embankment in, or raise the level of (a low place), with earth or gravel. [1913 Webster]

{To fill in}, to insert; as, he filled in the figures.

{To fill out}, to extend or enlarge to the desired limit; to make complete; as, to fill out a bill.

{To fill up}, to make quite full; to fill to the brim or entirely; to occupy completely; to complete. ``The bliss that fills up all the mind.'' --Pope. ``And fill up that which is behind of the afflictions of Christ.'' --Col. i. 24. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Filling — Fill ing, n. 1. That which is used to fill a cavity or any empty space, or to supply a deficiency; as, filling for a cavity in a tooth, a depression in a roadbed, the space between exterior and interior walls of masonry, the pores of open grained …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Filling — may refer to:* Filling (cooking), a food mixture used for stuffing * Dental fillings * Symplectic filling, a kind of cobordism in mathematics * Part of the leather crusting processee also* Fill …   Wikipedia

  • Filling up — Filling up, Wagengrundfarbe, ursprünglich aus England in den Handel gebrachte, jetzt aber überall hergestellte graubraune Farbe, die als Grundierung in der Wagenlackiererei vermöge ihrer besonderen Härte und Fertigkeit gute Dienste leistet. Sie… …   Lexikon der gesamten Technik

  • filling — verbal noun from FILL (Cf. fill) (v.). Dentistry sense is from 1848. Filling station attested by 1921 …   Etymology dictionary

  • filling — / filler [n] something that takes up capacity batting, bushing, cartridge, center, content, contents, cylinder, dressing, fill, guts*, impletion, inlay, innards, inside, layer, liner, mixture, pack, packing, pad, padding, refill, replenishment,… …   New thesaurus

  • filling — ► NOUN ▪ a quantity or piece of material that fills or is used to fill something. ► ADJECTIVE ▪ (of food) leaving one with a pleasantly satiated feeling …   English terms dictionary

  • filling — [fil′iŋ] n. 1. the act of one that fills 2. a thing used to fill something else or to supply what is lacking; specif., a) the metal, plastic, etc. inserted by a dentist into a prepared cavity in a tooth b) the foodstuff used between the slices of …   English World dictionary

  • Filling-in — In vision, filling in phenomena are those responsible for the completion of missing information across the physiological blind spot, and across natural and artificial scotomata. There is evidence calling for similar mechanisms of completion also… …   Wikipedia

  • filling — n. (dental) 1) to put in a filling 2) to cement a filling 3) a broken, cracked filling 4) a permanent; temporary filling 5) a filling breaks, cracks; chips; falls out * * * [ fɪlɪŋ] chips crackedfilling cracks falls out …   Combinatory dictionary

  • filling — /fil ing/, n. 1. an act or instance of filling. 2. something that is put in to fill something else: They used sand as filling for the depression. 3. Dentistry. a substance such as cement, amalgam, gold, or the like, used to fill a cavity caused… …   Universalium

  • filling — [[t]fɪ̱lɪŋ[/t]] fillings 1) N COUNT A filling is a small amount of metal or plastic that a dentist puts in a hole in a tooth to prevent further decay. The longer your child can go without needing a filling, the better. 2) N MASS The filling in… …   English dictionary

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