Maize (color)


Maize (color)

Maize (#FBEC5D)

Cereal maize the color is named for.

The color maize or corn refers to a shade of yellow; it is named for the cereal of the same name—maize (the cereal maize is called corn in the Americas). In public usage, maize can be applied to a variety of shades, ranging from light yellow to a dark shade that borders on orange, since the color of maize may vary.

The first recorded use of maize as a color name in English was in 1861. [1]


Maize in human culture

Biology

  • "Light maize in color, this wildflower is found only now and then in our area, and treasured for its rarity. The three clumps, two near the east fence under a thriving red-stemmed dogwood and one beside a weathered stump, gave us a thrill last spring with their first buds."[2]

Chemistry

  • "For slow cases, one can use the method... in which a solution of thymol blue has had its pH value adjusted so that it is maize in color and any slight increase in the acidity will make the solution turn blue."[3]

Sports

  • Maize is one of the two colors used by the University of Michigan Wolverines (the other being blue) although the actual shade of yellow used has varied over time; however, it always approaches the color of corn.[4]


See also


References

  1. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 198; Color Sample of Maize: Page 43 Plate 10 Color Sample G5
  2. ^ Rodale, Jerome Irving (1965). Organic gardening. Rodale Press. p. 54. 
  3. ^ Debler, Walter R. (1990). Fluid Mechanics Fundamentals. Prentice Hall. p. 615. ISBN 9780133223712. 
  4. ^ Liene Karels (Fall 1996). "What colors are maize and blue?". Michigan Today. http://www.umich.edu/~newsinfo/MT/96/Fall96/mta13f96.html. Retrieved 2009-01-16. 

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Maize (disambiguation) — Maize refers to corn, a cereal grain. Maize may also refer to: Maize or milo maize, another name for grain sorghum in the Midwestern U.S. Maize (album), by Pushmonkey Maize (color) Maize, Kansas, a U.S. city See also Maze (disambiguation) Corn… …   Wikipedia

  • maize — [māz] n. [Sp maíz < WInd (Taino) mahiz] 1. chiefly Brit. name for CORN1 (n. 3) 2. the color of ripe corn; yellow …   English World dictionary

  • Maize High School — For similar named schools, see Peabody High School (disambiguation). Maize High School Address 11600 West 45th Street North [1] Maize, Kansas, 67101 United States …   Wikipedia

  • Maize milling — The maize milling process starts with cleaning the grain and is usually followed by conditioning the maize (dampening the maize with water and then allowing it to condition for some time in a bin) Cleaning and conditioning of the maize as an… …   Wikipedia

  • maize — Corn Corn, n. [AS. corn; akin to OS. korn, D. koren, G., Dan., Sw., & Icel. korn, Goth. ka[ u]rn, L. granum, Russ. zerno. Cf. {Grain}, {Kernel}.] 1. A single seed of certain plants, as wheat, rye, barley, and maize; a grain. [1913 Webster] 2. The …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • color — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) Rainbow hue Nouns 1. color, hue, tint, tinge, shade, dye, complexion, tincture, cast, coloration, glow, flush; tone, key; color organ; Technicolor. 2. pure, primary, positive, or complementary color;… …   English dictionary for students

  • color — Synonyms and related words: Adrianople red, Alice blue, Arabian red, Argos brown, Bordeaux, Brunswick black, Brunswick blue, Burgundy, Capri blue, Cassel yellow, Chinese blue, Chinese white, Claude tint, Cologne brown, Columbian red, Congo rubine …   Moby Thesaurus

  • maize — /mayz/, n. 1. (chiefly in British and technical usage) corn1 (def. 1). 2. a pale yellow resembling the color of corn. [1545 55; < Sp maíz < Hispaniolan Taino mahís] * * * …   Universalium

  • maize — meɪz n. corn; pale yellow color …   English contemporary dictionary

  • maize — [[t]meɪz[/t]] n. 1) pln corn I, 1) 2) a pale yellow resembling the color of corn • Etymology: 1545–55; < Sp maíz < Taino mahís …   From formal English to slang


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