Folding chair


Folding chair
A typical folding chair

A folding chair is a light, portable chair that that folds flat, and can be stored in a stack, row, or on a cart.

Contents

Uses

Folding chairs are generally used for seating in areas where permanent seating is not possible or practical. This includes outdoor and indoor events such as funerals, college graduations, religious services, and sporting games and competitions. They are often used as weapons in professional wrestling.

Folding chairs are also used in the home for any situation requiring extra seating. This includes parties, card games, and temporary seating at the dinner table.

History

Folding chairs were already being used in Ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. The frame was mostly made of wood, and seldom made of metal. The wood was inlaid with artistic carvings, gilded, and decorated with ivory. In Northern Europe, folding chairs return to the brass age.

The folding chair became especially widespread during the Middle Ages. Here it was treasured as a liturgical furniture piece. Since the 15th and 16th century the folding chair has mostly had arm and head rests. Of course, newer chairs which are often found in functions and events are also called folding chairs. In 1947, Fredric Arnold created the first aluminum folding chair with fabric strapping for the seat and back. By 1957, the Fredric Arnold Company of Brooklyn, New York, was manufacturing more than 14,000 chairs per day. Today, the folding chair is mostly made of hard plastic or metal or wood. Folding chairs can be divided into different categories.

Design

Folding chairs typically weigh between 2 to 5 kilos (five to ten pounds) and are produced in a variety of styles, folding mechanisms, and materials.

Leg Pivoting

Folding chair legs can pivot to fold either under the seat, or at the seat.

Most folding chairs pivot at the seat level. The seat aligns between the back supports. The back support and the front legs are the same part. There are, however, several designs that fold under the seat. Side-X stools consist if two X-shaped pieces with a sheet of cloth between them that becomes the seat. Front-X chairs are similar to side-X stools, but have the addition of a backrest. Side-X chairs are unique because the support for the backrest and front foot is the same part. The seat is collapsed to align between the sidebars, either down between the front legs, or up to align between back-sidebars. Mechanisms vary, but the supports for the back and the front feet are invariably the same part. .also lucus pete

Pricing

Folding chairs of the side-X variety set up for an outdoor event

Prices and quality can be roughly divided into three categories, and is largely the same as for stacking chairs:

Low range

Light and inexpensive furniture usually made from steel tubing, with a plastic seat and backrest. This style provides a good value, and is very common in homes, churches, schools, and community events.

Mid range

Sturdy and a greater variety in styles and materials. They are typically not upholstered. Costs from approximately 25 dollars a piece (2008). Primary market is seating for large arenas, outdoor or places of worship but also cafes and brasseries.

Upper range

These folding chairs are often multiple reinforced, and come with padded seats and backrest. These are mainly sold for sporting events. The seat is sometimes made to fall backward so that it stands upright, making rainwater run off the upholstered seat.

High end

Folding chairs in this category are extremely few and are sold in a very small volume. They cost from 150 to 300 dollars a piece. They may be upholstered, but often they are priced higher because they are associated with a renowned manufacturer.

See also

External links


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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Folding chair — Folding Fold ing, n. 1. The act of making a fold or folds; also, a fold; a doubling; a plication. [1913 Webster] The lower foldings of the vest. Addison. [1913 Webster] 2. (Agric.) The keepig of sheep in inclosures on arable land, etc. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • folding chair — noun a chair that can be folded flat for storage (Freq. 1) • Hypernyms: ↑chair • Hyponyms: ↑camp chair, ↑deck chair, ↑beach chair, ↑yacht chair • Part Meronyms: ↑ …   Useful english dictionary

  • folding chair — chair that can be folded together for easy storage and portability …   English contemporary dictionary

  • folding chair — noun A light portable chair that can be stored in a stack, row or on a specially designed cart. They are produced in a variety of styles, folding mechanisms and materials …   Wiktionary

  • folding chair — a chair that can be collapsed flat for easy storage or transport. [1670 80] * * * …   Universalium

  • folding chair —   Noho opi opi …   English-Hawaiian dictionary

  • Folding — Fold ing, n. 1. The act of making a fold or folds; also, a fold; a doubling; a plication. [1913 Webster] The lower foldings of the vest. Addison. [1913 Webster] 2. (Agric.) The keepig of sheep in inclosures on arable land, etc. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Folding boat — Folding Fold ing, n. 1. The act of making a fold or folds; also, a fold; a doubling; a plication. [1913 Webster] The lower foldings of the vest. Addison. [1913 Webster] 2. (Agric.) The keepig of sheep in inclosures on arable land, etc. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Folding door — Folding Fold ing, n. 1. The act of making a fold or folds; also, a fold; a doubling; a plication. [1913 Webster] The lower foldings of the vest. Addison. [1913 Webster] 2. (Agric.) The keepig of sheep in inclosures on arable land, etc. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • chair — Synonyms and related words: Eames chair, Hitchcock chair, TV chair, administer, administrate, anoint, armchair, armless chair, authority, ax, back seat, banquette, bar stool, barber chair, barrel chair, basket chair, batwing chair, be master, bed …   Moby Thesaurus


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