Night climbing in Cambridge


Night climbing in Cambridge

Night climbing is a term used principally at Oxford and Cambridge universities, England, to describe the sport of climbing up the walls of colleges and public buildings, and exploring the rooftops.

This activity is frowned on by college authorities, so it is mainly done under cover of darkness, to avoid detection.

It is a subset of buildering, or urban climbing, and is distinguished by the fact that it is usually carried out nocturnally by university students.

The original term for this activity was "Roof Climbing". The alternative term "Night Climbing" was introduced in the late 1930s, and has become the standard term.

Contents

History

In 1895, Geoffrey Winthrop Young, the great alpinist, started to climb the roofs of Cambridge University, England. Students had been scrambling up the university buildings for years [1], but Young was the first to document this activity. He wrote and published a night climbing guide to Trinity College [2].

In 1905, while a master at Eton College, Young produced his second book, a small volume on buildering, entitled "Wall and Roof Climbing" [3]. This was a very erudite work, containing a rich variety of quotations from writers of many different periods and cultures.

In 1921, inspired by Young's guide to Trinity, a group of undergraduates, including Hartley, Grag and Darlington, published a night climbing guide to St John's College [4].

In 1930, John Hurst wrote the second edition of the guide to Trinity [5].

In 1937, a more comprehensive, though still light-hearted, account of Cambridge undergraduate night climbing appeared in popular print [6], written by Noël Howard Symington, under the pseudonym "Whipplesnaith".

Night climbing remained popular in Cambridge after World War II. In 1960, Richard Williams wrote the third edition of the Trinity guide [7]. In 1970, a book entitled "Night Climbing in Cambridge" [8] was published under the pseudonym "Hederatus". Night climbing also featured prominently in a book by F A Reeve, entitled "Varsity Rags and Hoaxes" [9], published in 1977, and in the detective novel “The Bad Quarto” by Jill Paton Walsh [10], published in 2007.

In recent years, a number of books on night climbing in Cambridge have been published by Oleander Press, of Cambridge, as follows:

  • In 2007, they reprinted the Whipplesnaith book [11].
  • In 2009, they reprinted Geoffrey Winthrop Young's first edition of the Trinity Guide [12], and the St John's Guide [13].
  • In 2010, they reprinted John Hurst's second edition of the Trinity Guide [14], and Young's book "Wall and Roof Climbing" [15].
  • In 2011, they published an omnibus edition of the three Trinity guides [16], including an introduction by Richard Williams which reviewed the history of night climbing in Cambridge from the 18th century to the present day. This introduction removed the cloak of anonymity that had previously protected the identities of the first nocturnal explorers. This book is the most significant addition to the night climbing literature that has been published in recent years.

The identification of the first Cambridge night climber remains an open question, but Geoffrey Winthrop Young is generally regarded as the original pioneer.

Famous night climbers

In the 1930s, Whipplesnaith (Noël Symington) climbed many buildings in Cambridge, England.

In 1895, Geoffrey Winthrop Young pioneered the sport of night climbing in Cambridge, England.

References

  1. ^ Geoffrey Winthrop Young: Poet, educator, mountaineer (1995), by Alan Hankinson, published by Hodder & Stoughton, London
  2. ^ The Roof Climber's Guide to Trinity (1900), written by Geoffrey Winthrop Young, published anonymously, W P Spalding, Cambridge, England
  3. ^ Wall and Roof Climbing (1905), written by Geoffrey Winthrop Young, published anonymously, Spottiswoode & Co., Eton College, England
  4. ^ The Roof Climber's Guide to St Johns (1921), written by a group of undergraduates including Hartley, Grag and Darlington, published anonymously, Metcalfe & Co., Cambridge, England.
  5. ^ The Roof Climber's Guide to Trinity, 2nd edition (1930), written by John Hurst, published anonymously, W P Spalding, Cambridge, England
  6. ^ The Night Climbers of Cambridge (1937), written by Noël Howard Symington under the pseudonym "Whipplesnaith" , Chatto & Windus Ltd, London
  7. ^ The Night Climber's Guide to Trinity, 3rd edition (1960), written by Richard Williams, published anonymously, Weatherhead Ltd, Cambridge, England
  8. ^ Cambridge night climbing (1970), written under the pseudonym "Hederatus", Chatto & Windus Ltd, London
  9. ^ Varsity Rags and Hoaxes (1977), written by F A Reeve
  10. ^ The Bad Quarto (2007), a detective novel written by Jill Paton Walsh, published by Hodder and Stoughton, London
  11. ^ The Night Climbers of Cambridge (reprinted 2007), written by Noël Howard Symington under the pseudonym "Whipplesnaith" , Oleander Press, Cambridge, England
  12. ^ The Roof Climber's Guide to Trinity (reprinted 2007), written by Geoffrey Winthrop Young, published anonymously, Oleander Press, Cambridge, England
  13. ^ The Roof Climber's Guide to St John’s (reprinted 2009), written by a group of students including Hartley, Grag and Darlington, published anonymously, Oleander Press, Cambridge, England.
  14. ^ The Roof Climber's Guide to Trinity, 2nd edition (reprinted 2010), written by John Hurst, published anonymously, Oleander Press, Cambridge, England.
  15. ^ Wall and Roof Climbing (reprinted 2010), written by Geoffrey Winthrop Young, published anonymously, Oleander Press, Cambridge, England.
  16. ^ The Roof-Climber's Guide to Trinity, Omnibus Edition (2011), Oleander Press, Cambridge, England.

See also

External links

Locations


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • The Night Climbers of Cambridge — is a book written under the pseudonym Whipplesnaith about nocturnal climbing on the colleges and town buildings of Cambridge, England, in the 1930s. Whipplesnaith is a pseudonym for Noël Howard Symington. The book was originally published in… …   Wikipedia

  • Cambridge — This article is about the city in England. For other uses, see Cambridge (disambiguation). City of Cambridge   Non metropolitan district, city   …   Wikipedia

  • Magdalene College, Cambridge — This article is about the Cambridge college. For other uses, see Magdalen College (disambiguation). Coordinates: 52°12′37″N 0°6′58″E / 52.21028°N 0.11611°E …   Wikipedia

  • University of Cambridge legends — There are a number of popular legends associated with Cambridge University and its history, often recounted by punt guides to tourists whilst cruising the River Cam. Some are true, some contain elements of truth and others are somewhat more… …   Wikipedia

  • Buildering — (also known as urban climbing, structuring, or stegophily) is the act of climbing on (usually) the outside of buildings and other artificial structures. The word buildering is a portmanteau combining the word building with the climbing term… …   Wikipedia

  • Mount Kenya — Elevation 5,199 m (17,057 ft) …   Wikipedia

  • Mountaineering on Mount Kenya — Mount Kenya National Park Natural history Climate Mountaineering Names list …   Wikipedia

  • Nick Raynsford — The Right Honourable Nick Raynsford MP Member of Parliament for Greenwich and Woolwich Greenwich (1992 1997) Incumbent Assumed …   Wikipedia

  • performing arts — arts or skills that require public performance, as acting, singing, or dancing. [1945 50] * * * ▪ 2009 Introduction Music Classical.       The last vestiges of the Cold War seemed to thaw for a moment on Feb. 26, 2008, when the unfamiliar strains …   Universalium

  • literature — /lit euhr euh cheuhr, choor , li treuh /, n. 1. writings in which expression and form, in connection with ideas of permanent and universal interest, are characteristic or essential features, as poetry, novels, history, biography, and essays. 2.… …   Universalium


We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.