verb (-tinued; -tinuing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French continuer, from Latin continuare, from continuus Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. to maintain without interruption a condition, course, or action <
the boat continued downstream
2. to remain in existence ; endure <
the tradition continues
3. to remain in a place or condition ; stay <
cannot continue here much longer
4. to resume an activity after interruption <
we'll continue after lunch
transitive verb 1. a. keep up, maintain <
continues walking
b. to keep going or add to ; prolong <
continue the battle
; also to resume after intermission 2. to cause to continue <
chose not to continue her subscription
3. to allow to remain in a place or condition ; retain <
the trustees were continued
4. to postpone (a legal proceeding) by a continuancecontinuer noun Synonyms: continue, last, endure, abide, persist mean to exist over a period of time or indefinitely. continue applies to a process going on without ending <
the search for peace will continue
. last especially when unqualified, may stress existing beyond what is normal or expected <
buy shoes that will last
. endure adds an implication of resisting destructive forces or agencies <
in spite of everything, her faith endured
. abide implies stable and constant existing especially as opposed to mutability <
a love that abides through 40 years of marriage
. persist suggests outlasting the normal or appointed time and often connotes obstinacy or doggedness <
the sense of guilt persisted

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • continue — ● continue nom féminin Consonne dont l émission s accompagne d un écoulement ininterrompu du flux d air phonatoire. (Les constrictives, les approximantes, les latérales, les glides et les nasales sont des continues.) ● continu, continue adjectif… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • continue — con·tin·ue vt tin·ued, tinu·ing: to postpone (a legal proceeding) to a future day Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. continue I …   Law dictionary

  • Continue — Con*tin ue, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Continued}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Continuing}.] [F. continuer, L. continuare, tinuatum, to connect, continue, fr. continuus. See {Continuous}, and cf. {Continuate}.] 1. To remain in a given place or condition; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Continue — may refer to: Continue (video gaming), an option to continue a video game after all the player s lives have been lost Continue (album), a 2008 Cantopop album by Pakho Chau Continue (keyword), a programming language keyword See also Continuity… …   Wikipedia

  • continue — [kən tin′yo͞o] vi. continued, continuing [ME continuen < OFr continuer < L continuare, to join, make continuous < continuus, continuous < continere: see CONTAIN] 1. to remain in existence or effect; last; endure [the war continued for …   English World dictionary

  • Continue — Con*tin ue, v. t. 1. To unite; to connect. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] the use of the navel is to continue the infant unto the mother. Sir T. browne. [1913 Webster] 2. To protract or extend in duration; to preserve or persist in; to cease not. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • continue — CONTINUE. s. f. Durée sans interruption. Il ne s emploie qu adverbialement. A la continue, pour dire, A la longue, à force de continuer. Il travaille d abord avec ardeur, mais à la continue il se ralentit. A la continue il se lasse …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

  • continue — Continue. s. f. Durée sans interruption. Travaillez y sans cesse, la continus l emporte. A la continue, adverbial. A la longue. Il travaille d abord avec ardeur, mais à la continuë il se ralentit. à la continuë il se lasse …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • continué — continué, ée (kon ti nu é, ée) part. passé. L expédition continuée malgré les obstacles. Un magistrat continué dans ses fonctions. Un ouvrage resté longtemps inachevé et enfin continué …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • continue — continue, last, endure, abide, persist are comparable when meaning to remain indefinitely in existence or in a given condition or course. Continue distinctively refers to the process and stresses its lack of an end rather than the duration of or… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • continue — should not be followed by on (adverb), although this is sometimes found in informal writing: • I continued on down the street A. Bergman, 1975. Use either continue (without on) or a verb of motion (such as go, move, etc.) with on. This use of the …   Modern English usage

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