postpone
transitive verb (postponed; postponing) Etymology: Latin postponere to place after, postpone, from post- + ponere to place — more at position Date: circa 1520 1. to put off to a later time ; defer 2. a. to place later (as in a sentence) than the normal position in English <
postpone an adjective
>
b. to place later in order of precedence, preference, or importance Synonyms: see deferpostponable adjectivepostponement nounpostponer noun

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

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  • postpone — post·pone vt post·poned, post·pon·ing 1: to put off to a later time 2: to place later in precedence, preference, or importance; specif: to subordinate (a lien) to a later lien post·pon·able adj post·pone·ment n Merriam Webster’s Dictionary …   Law dictionary

  • postpone — post‧pone [pəæʊstˈpəʊn ǁ poʊsˈpoʊn] verb [transitive] to change the date or time of a planned event to a later one: • The meeting has been postponed until next Tuesday. * * * postpone UK US /pəʊstˈpəʊn/ verb [T] ► to decide that an event should… …   Financial and business terms

  • Postpone — Post*pone , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Postponed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Postponing}.] [L. postponere, postpositum; post after + ponere to place, put. See {Post }, and {Position}.] 1. To defer to a future or later time; to put off; also, to cause to be… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • postpone — c.1500, from L. postponere put after, neglect, postpone, from post after + ponere put, place (see POSITION (Cf. position)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • postpone — *defer, suspend, stay, intermit Analogous words: *delay, retard, slow, slacken …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • postpone — [v] put off till later time adjourn, cool it*, defer, delay, give a rain check*, hang fire*, hold off, hold over, hold up, lay over, pigeonhole*, prorogue, put back, put on back burner*, put on hold, shelve, suspend, table; concept 130 Ant. carry …   New thesaurus

  • postpone — ► VERB ▪ arrange for (something) to take place at a time later than that first scheduled. DERIVATIVES postponement noun. ORIGIN Latin postponere, from post after + ponere to place …   English terms dictionary

  • postpone — [pōst pōn′] vt. postponed, postponing [L postponere < post , POST + ponere, to put: see POSITION] 1. to put off until later; defer; delay 2. to put at or near the end of the sentence [the German verb is postponed] 3. Rare to subordinate …   English World dictionary

  • postpone — 01. We ve had to [postpone] the picnic because a number of people are busy that day. 02. The search for the plane that crashed in the mountains has been [postponed] due to bad weather. 03. I m afraid that if we decide to [postpone] our wedding,… …   Grammatical examples in English

  • postpone — verb sorry, we ll have to postpone the relay race Syn: put off/back, delay, defer, reschedule, adjourn, shelve, put over, take a rain check on; informal put on ice, put on the back burner; rare remit Ant: bring forward •• postpone, adjourn, defer …   Thesaurus of popular words

  • postpone — verb ADVERB ▪ indefinitely ▪ The event has been postponed indefinitely due to lack of interest. ▪ merely, only ▪ The inevitable conflict was merely postponed till the next meeting …   Collocations dictionary

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