Hydrostatic bed
Hydrostatic Hy`dro*stat"ic, Hydrostatical Hy`dro*stat"ic*al, a. [Hydro-, 1 + Gr. ? causing to stand: cf. F. hydrostatique. See {Static}.] Of or relating to hydrostatics; pertaining to, or in accordance with, the principles of the equilibrium of fluids. [1913 Webster]

The first discovery made in hydrostatics since the time of Archimedes is due to Stevinus. --Hallam. [1913 Webster]

{Hydrostatic balance}, a balance for weighing substances in water, for the purpose of ascertaining their specific gravities.

{Hydrostatic bed}, a water bed.

{Hydrostatic bellows}, an apparatus consisting of a water-tight bellowslike case with a long, upright tube, into which water may be poured to illustrate the hydrostatic paradox.

{Hydrostatic paradox}, the proposition in hydrostatics that any quantity of water, however small, may be made to counterbalance any weight, however great; or the law of the equality of pressure of fluids in all directions.

{Hydrostatic press}, a machine in which great force, with slow motion, is communicated to a large plunger by means of water forced into the cylinder in which it moves, by a forcing pump of small diameter, to which the power is applied, the principle involved being the same as in the hydrostatic bellows. Also called {hydraulic press}, and {Bramah press}. In the illustration, a is a pump with a small plunger b, which forces the water into the cylinder c, thus driving upward the large plunder d, which performs the reduced work, such as compressing cotton bales, etc. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • hydrostatic bed — n WATER BED * * * water b …   Medical dictionary

  • hydrostatic bed — noun : water bed …   Useful english dictionary

  • Hydrostatic — Hy dro*stat ic, Hydrostatical Hy dro*stat ic*al, a. [Hydro , 1 + Gr. ? causing to stand: cf. F. hydrostatique. See {Static}.] Of or relating to hydrostatics; pertaining to, or in accordance with, the principles of the equilibrium of fluids. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hydrostatic balance — Hydrostatic Hy dro*stat ic, Hydrostatical Hy dro*stat ic*al, a. [Hydro , 1 + Gr. ? causing to stand: cf. F. hydrostatique. See {Static}.] Of or relating to hydrostatics; pertaining to, or in accordance with, the principles of the equilibrium of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hydrostatic bellows — Hydrostatic Hy dro*stat ic, Hydrostatical Hy dro*stat ic*al, a. [Hydro , 1 + Gr. ? causing to stand: cf. F. hydrostatique. See {Static}.] Of or relating to hydrostatics; pertaining to, or in accordance with, the principles of the equilibrium of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hydrostatic paradox — Hydrostatic Hy dro*stat ic, Hydrostatical Hy dro*stat ic*al, a. [Hydro , 1 + Gr. ? causing to stand: cf. F. hydrostatique. See {Static}.] Of or relating to hydrostatics; pertaining to, or in accordance with, the principles of the equilibrium of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hydrostatic press — Hydrostatic Hy dro*stat ic, Hydrostatical Hy dro*stat ic*al, a. [Hydro , 1 + Gr. ? causing to stand: cf. F. hydrostatique. See {Static}.] Of or relating to hydrostatics; pertaining to, or in accordance with, the principles of the equilibrium of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Bed rest — is a doctor s prescription to spend a longer period of time in bed.Adverse effectsProlonged bed rest has long been known to have deleterious physiological effects, such as muscle atrophy and other forms of deconditioning. Besides lack of physical …   Wikipedia

  • Hydrostatic press — Press Press, n. [F. presse. See 4th {Press}.] 1. An apparatus or machine by which any substance or body is pressed, squeezed, stamped, or shaped, or by which an impression of a body is taken; sometimes, the place or building containing a press or …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hydrostatic shock — The term hydrostatic shock describes the theory that a penetrating projectile produces remote wounding and incapacitating effects in living targets, in addition to local effects in tissue caused by direct impact, through a hydraulic effect in… …   Wikipedia

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