Huckstered
Huckster Huck"ster, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Huckstered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Huckstering}.] To deal in small articles, or in petty bargains. --Swift. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Huckster — Huck ster, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Huckstered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Huckstering}.] To deal in small articles, or in petty bargains. Swift. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Huckstering — Huckster Huck ster, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Huckstered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Huckstering}.] To deal in small articles, or in petty bargains. Swift. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Infamously — In fa*mous*ly, adv. In an infamous manner or degree; scandalously; disgracefully; shamefully. [1913 Webster] The sealed fountain of royal bounty which had been infamously monopolized and huckstered. Burke. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • huckster — I. noun Etymology: Middle English hukster, from Middle Dutch hokester, from hoeken to peddle Date: 13th century 1. hawker, peddler 2. one who produces promotional material for commercial clients especially for radio or television • hucksterism… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • huckster — (n.) c.1200, petty merchant, peddler (often contemptuous), from M.Du. hokester peddler, from hoken to peddle (see HAWK (Cf. hawk) (v.1)) + agent suffix ster (which was typically feminine in English, but not in Low German). Specific sense of… …   Etymology dictionary

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