To deal in
Deal Deal, v. i. 1. To make distribution; to share out in portions, as cards to the players. [1913 Webster]

2. To do a distributing or retailing business, as distinguished from that of a manufacturer or producer; to traffic; to trade; to do business; as, he deals in flour. [1913 Webster]

They buy and sell, they deal and traffic. --South. [1913 Webster]

This is to drive to wholesale trade, when all other petty merchants deal but for parcels. --Dr. H. More. [1913 Webster]

3. To act as an intermediary in business or any affairs; to manage; to make arrangements; -- followed by between or with. [1913 Webster]

Sometimes he that deals between man and man, raiseth his own credit with both, by pretending greater interest than he hath in either. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

4. To conduct one's self; to behave or act in any affair or towards any one; to treat. [1913 Webster]

If he will deal clearly and impartially, . . . he will acknowledge all this to be true. --Tillotson. [1913 Webster]

5. To contend (with); to treat (with), by way of opposition, check, or correction; as, he has turbulent passions to deal with. [1913 Webster]

{To deal by}, to treat, either well or ill; as, to deal well by servants. ``Such an one deals not fairly by his own mind.'' --Locke.

{To deal in}. (a) To have to do with; to be engaged in; to practice; as, they deal in political matters. (b) To buy and sell; to furnish, as a retailer or wholesaler; as, they deal in fish.

{To deal with}. (a) To treat in any manner; to use, whether well or ill; to have to do with; specifically, to trade with. ``Dealing with witches.'' --Shak. (b) To reprove solemnly; to expostulate with. [1913 Webster]

The deacons of his church, who, to use their own phrase, ``dealt with him'' on the sin of rejecting the aid which Providence so manifestly held out. --Hawthorne. [1913 Webster]

Return . . . and I will deal well with thee. --Gen. xxxii. 9. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To deal in futures — Future Fu ture, n. [Cf. F. futur. See {Future}, a.] [1913 Webster] 1. Time to come; time subsequent to the present (as, the future shall be as the present); collectively, events that are to happen in time to come. Lay the future open. Shak. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take in — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To cut in — Cut Cut (k[u^]t), v. i. 1. To do the work of an edged tool; to serve in dividing or gashing; as, a knife cuts well. [1913 Webster] 2. To admit of incision or severance; to yield to a cutting instrument. [1913 Webster] Panels of white wood that… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To deal by — Deal Deal, v. i. 1. To make distribution; to share out in portions, as cards to the players. [1913 Webster] 2. To do a distributing or retailing business, as distinguished from that of a manufacturer or producer; to traffic; to trade; to do… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To deal with — Deal Deal, v. i. 1. To make distribution; to share out in portions, as cards to the players. [1913 Webster] 2. To do a distributing or retailing business, as distinguished from that of a manufacturer or producer; to traffic; to trade; to do… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To bear in hand — Hand Hand (h[a^]nd), n. [AS. hand, hond; akin to D., G., & Sw. hand, OHG. hant, Dan. haand, Icel. h[ o]nd, Goth. handus, and perh. to Goth. hin[thorn]an to seize (in comp.). Cf. {Hunt}.] 1. That part of the fore limb below the forearm or wrist in …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To have in hand — Hand Hand (h[a^]nd), n. [AS. hand, hond; akin to D., G., & Sw. hand, OHG. hant, Dan. haand, Icel. h[ o]nd, Goth. handus, and perh. to Goth. hin[thorn]an to seize (in comp.). Cf. {Hunt}.] 1. That part of the fore limb below the forearm or wrist in …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take in hand — Hand Hand (h[a^]nd), n. [AS. hand, hond; akin to D., G., & Sw. hand, OHG. hant, Dan. haand, Icel. h[ o]nd, Goth. handus, and perh. to Goth. hin[thorn]an to seize (in comp.). Cf. {Hunt}.] 1. That part of the fore limb below the forearm or wrist in …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take in hand — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take in vain — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”