Glacier theory
Glacier Gla"cier, n. [F. glacier, fr. glace ice, L. glacies.] An immense field or stream of ice, formed in the region of perpetual snow, and moving slowly down a mountain slope or valley, as in the Alps, or over an extended area, as in Greenland. [1913 Webster]

Note: The mass of compacted snow forming the upper part of a glacier is called the firn, or n['e]v['e]; the glacier proper consist of solid ice, deeply crevassed where broken up by irregularities in the slope or direction of its path. A glacier usually carries with it accumulations of stones and dirt called moraines, which are designated, according to their position, as lateral, medial, or terminal (see {Moraine}). The common rate of flow of the Alpine glaciers is from ten to twenty inches per day in summer, and about half that in winter. [1913 Webster]

{Glacier theory} (Geol.), the theory that large parts of the frigid and temperate zones were covered with ice during the glacial, or ice, period, and that, by the agency of this ice, the loose materials on the earth's surface, called drift or diluvium, were transported and accumulated. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • glacier theory — noun : a theory in glaciology: drift was deposited through the agency of glaciers in the Glacial epoch * * * glacier theory, Geology. the geological theory, now generally accepted, that large areas of the Northern Hemisphere were once covered by… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Glacier — Gla cier, n. [F. glacier, fr. glace ice, L. glacies.] An immense field or stream of ice, formed in the region of perpetual snow, and moving slowly down a mountain slope or valley, as in the Alps, or over an extended area, as in Greenland. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • glacier — glaciered, adj. /glay sheuhr/, n. an extended mass of ice formed from snow falling and accumulating over the years and moving very slowly, either descending from high mountains, as in valley glaciers, or moving outward from centers of… …   Universalium

  • Glacial theory — Glacial Gla cial, a. [L. glacialis, from glacies ice: cf. F. glacial.] 1. Pertaining to ice or to its action; consisting of ice; frozen; icy; esp., pertaining to glaciers; as, glacial phenomena. Lyell. [1913 Webster] 2. (Chem.) Resembling ice;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • glacial theory — noun : glacier theory …   Useful english dictionary

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  • Glacial — Gla cial, a. [L. glacialis, from glacies ice: cf. F. glacial.] 1. Pertaining to ice or to its action; consisting of ice; frozen; icy; esp., pertaining to glaciers; as, glacial phenomena. Lyell. [1913 Webster] 2. (Chem.) Resembling ice; having the …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Glacial acid — Glacial Gla cial, a. [L. glacialis, from glacies ice: cf. F. glacial.] 1. Pertaining to ice or to its action; consisting of ice; frozen; icy; esp., pertaining to glaciers; as, glacial phenomena. Lyell. [1913 Webster] 2. (Chem.) Resembling ice;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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