Aneroid barometer
Barometer Ba*rom"e*ter, n. [Gr. ba`ros weight + -meter: cf. F. barom[`e]tre.] An instrument for determining the weight or pressure of the atmosphere, and hence for judging of the probable changes of weather, or for ascertaining the height of any ascent. [1913 Webster]

Note: The barometer was invented by Torricelli at Florence about 1643. It is made in its simplest form by filling a graduated glass tube about 34 inches long with mercury and inverting it in a cup containing mercury. The column of mercury in the tube descends until balanced by the weight of the atmosphere, and its rise or fall under varying conditions is a measure of the change in the atmospheric pressure. At the sea level its ordinary height is about 30 inches (760 millimeters). See {Sympiesometer}. --Nichol. [1913 Webster]

{Aneroid barometer}. See {Aneroid barometer}, under {Aneroid}.

{Marine barometer}, a barometer with tube contracted at bottom to prevent rapid oscillations of the mercury, and suspended in gimbals from an arm or support on shipboard.

{Mountain barometer}, a portable mercurial barometer with tripod support, and long scale, for measuring heights.

{Siphon barometer}, a barometer having a tube bent like a hook with the longer leg closed at the top. The height of the mercury in the longer leg shows the pressure of the atmosphere.

{Wheel barometer}, a barometer with recurved tube, and a float, from which a cord passes over a pulley and moves an index. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Aneroid barometer — Aneroid An e*roid, a. [Gr. a priv. + nhro s wet, moist + oid: cf. F. an[ e]ro[ i]de.] Containing no liquid; said of a kind of barometer. [1913 Webster] {Aneroid barometer}, a barometer the action of which depends on the varying pressure of the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • aneroid barometer — n a barometer in which the action of atmospheric pressure in bending a metallic surface is made to move a pointer …   Medical dictionary

  • aneroid barometer — n. a barometer with a needle connected by mechanical linkages and springs to a thin, hollow metal disk in which a partial vacuum is maintained: a change in atmospheric pressure changes the shape of the disk, thus moving the needle …   English World dictionary

  • aneroid barometer — noun a barometer that measures pressure without using fluids • Syn: ↑aneroid • Derivationally related forms: ↑aneroid (for: ↑aneroid) • Hypernyms: ↑barometer …   Useful english dictionary

  • aneroid barometer — barometras aneroidas statusas T sritis automatika atitikmenys: angl. aneroid barometer vok. Aneroidbarometer, n rus. барометр анероид, m pranc. baromètre anéroïde, m …   Automatikos terminų žodynas

  • aneroid barometer — aneroidinis barometras statusas T sritis Standartizacija ir metrologija apibrėžtis Atmosferos slėgio matuoklis, kurio veikimas pagrįstas vakuumuotos gofruotos metalinės dėžutės deformacija. atitikmenys: angl. aneroid barometer vok.… …   Penkiakalbis aiškinamasis metrologijos terminų žodynas

  • aneroid barometer — barometer that measures atmospheric pressure by means of a thin metal disk which covers a partial vacuum …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Aneroid-Barometer — Jugendstil Wandbarometer Ein Barometer ist ein Messgerät zur Bestimmung des Luftdrucks und findet in einer Vielfalt unterschiedlichster Formen und Typen meist in der Meteorologie Anwendung. Es handelt sich folglich um eine spezielle Gruppe von… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • aneroid barometer — An instrument that measures the atmospheric pressure. It consists of a cylindrical vacuum chamber with corrugated tops and sides. A system of springs within the chamber prevents the chamber from collapsing as a result of outside air pressure. A… …   Aviation dictionary

  • aneroid barometer — a device for measuring atmospheric pressure, often specially calibrated for use as an altimeter, consisting of a box or chamber partially exhausted of air, having an elastic top and a pointer to indicate the degree of compression of the top… …   Universalium

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”