Evening flower
Evening E"ven*ing, n. [AS. [=ae]fnung. See {even}, n., and cf. {Eve}.] 1. The latter part and close of the day, and the beginning of darkness or night; properly, the decline of the day, or of the sun. [1913 Webster]

In the ascending scale Of heaven, the stars that usher evening rose. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

Note: Sometimes, especially in the Southern parts of the United States, the afternoon is called evening. --Bartlett. [1913 Webster]

2. The latter portion, as of life; the declining period, as of strength or glory. [1913 Webster]

Note: Sometimes used adjectively; as, evening gun. ``Evening Prayer.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{Evening flower} (Bot.), a genus of iridaceous plants ({Hesperantha}) from the Cape of Good Hope, with sword-shaped leaves, and sweet-scented flowers which expand in the evening.

{Evening grosbeak} (Zo["o]l.), an American singing bird ({Coccothraustes vespertina}) having a very large bill. Its color is olivaceous, with the crown, wings, and tail black, and the under tail coverts yellow. So called because it sings in the evening.

{Evening primrose}. See under {Primrose}.

{The evening star}, the bright star of early evening in the western sky, soon passing below the horizon; specifically, the planet Venus; -- called also {Vesper} and {Hesperus}. During portions of the year, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn are also evening stars. See {Morning Star}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Evening — E ven*ing, n. [AS. [=ae]fnung. See {even}, n., and cf. {Eve}.] 1. The latter part and close of the day, and the beginning of darkness or night; properly, the decline of the day, or of the sun. [1913 Webster] In the ascending scale Of heaven, the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Evening grosbeak — Evening E ven*ing, n. [AS. [=ae]fnung. See {even}, n., and cf. {Eve}.] 1. The latter part and close of the day, and the beginning of darkness or night; properly, the decline of the day, or of the sun. [1913 Webster] In the ascending scale Of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Evening primrose — Evening E ven*ing, n. [AS. [=ae]fnung. See {even}, n., and cf. {Eve}.] 1. The latter part and close of the day, and the beginning of darkness or night; properly, the decline of the day, or of the sun. [1913 Webster] In the ascending scale Of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • evening trumpet-flower — geltonžiedis kampotris statusas T sritis vardynas apibrėžtis Činčiberinių šeimos dekoratyvinis, vaistinis nuodingas augalas (Gelsemium sempervirens), paplitęs Šiaurės ir Pietų Amerikoje. atitikmenys: lot. Gelsemium sempervirens angl. Carolina… …   Lithuanian dictionary (lietuvių žodynas)

  • evening trumpet flower — noun poisonous woody evergreen vine of southeastern United States having fragrant yellow funnel shaped flowers • Syn: ↑yellow jasmine, ↑yellow jessamine, ↑Carolina jasmine, ↑Gelsemium sempervirens • Hypernyms: ↑vine • Member Holonyms …   Useful english dictionary

  • The evening star — Evening E ven*ing, n. [AS. [=ae]fnung. See {even}, n., and cf. {Eve}.] 1. The latter part and close of the day, and the beginning of darkness or night; properly, the decline of the day, or of the sun. [1913 Webster] In the ascending scale Of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • eveningtrumpet flower — evening trumpet flower n. See Carolina jasmine. * * * …   Universalium

  • Curse of the Golden Flower — Theatrical release poster Traditional 滿城盡帶黃金甲 …   Wikipedia

  • Chiang Mai Flower Festival — Chiang Mai, Thailand, is often known as the Rose of the North, but it really blooms into flower in February, towards the end of the cool season. Every year on the first weekend of February, the Chiang Mai Flower Festival is opened. The flower… …   Wikipedia

  • wild flower — noun wild or uncultivated flowering plant • Syn: ↑wildflower • Hypernyms: ↑angiosperm, ↑flowering plant, ↑wilding • Hyponyms: ↑sagebrush buttercup, ↑ …   Useful english dictionary

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