Without With*out", prep. [OE. withoute, withouten, AS. wi[eth]?tan; wi[eth] with, against, toward + ?tan outside, fr. ?t out. See {With}, prep., {Out}.] [1913 Webster] 1. On or at the outside of; out of; not within; as, without doors. [1913 Webster]

Without the gate Some drive the cars, and some the coursers rein. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

2. Out of the limits of; out of reach of; beyond. [1913 Webster]

Eternity, before the world and after, is without our reach. --T. Burnet. [1913 Webster]

3. Not with; otherwise than with; in absence of, separation from, or destitution of; not with use or employment of; independently of; exclusively of; with omission; as, without labor; without damage. [1913 Webster]

I wolde it do withouten negligence. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

Wise men will do it without a law. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

Without the separation of the two monarchies, the most advantageous terms . . . must end in our destruction. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

There is no living with thee nor without thee. --Tatler. [1913 Webster]

{To do without}. See under {Do}.

{Without day} [a translation of L. sine die], without the appointment of a day to appear or assemble again; finally; as, the Fortieth Congress then adjourned without day.

{Without recourse}. See under {Recourse}. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • without — [with out′, without′] adv. [ME withuten < OE withutan < with, WITH + utan, from outside, without < ut, OUT] 1. on the outside; externally 2. outside a building or place; out of doors prep. 1. Now Rare at, on, to, or toward the outside of …   English World dictionary

  • without — 1. Unlike the corresponding physical meaning of within (= inside), the original meaning of without, ‘outside’ (preposition and adverb), is no longer much used, although it will be familiar from literary contexts • (There is a green hill far away …   Modern English usage

  • Without — With*out , adv. 1. On or art the outside; not on the inside; not within; outwardly; externally. [1913 Webster] Without were fightings, within were fears. 2 Cor. vii. 5. [1913 Webster] 2. Outside of the house; out of doors. [1913 Webster] The… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Without — With*out , conj. Unless; except; introducing a clause. [1913 Webster] You will never live to my age without you keep yourselves in breath with exercise, and in heart with joyfulness. Sir P. Sidney. [1913 Webster] Note: Now rarely used by good… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • without — O.E. wiðutan, lit. against the outside (opposite of within), see WITH (Cf. with) + OUT (Cf. out). As a word expressing lack or want of something (opposite of with), attested from c.1200. In use by late 14c. as a conjunction, short for without… …   Etymology dictionary

  • without — ► PREPOSITION 1) not accompanied by or having the use of. 2) in which the action mentioned does not happen. 3) archaic or literary outside. ► ADVERB archaic or literary ▪ outside. ► CONJUNCTION archaic or dialect 1) …   English terms dictionary

  • without — index devoid, peripheral, save, unless Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • without — [adv] outside after, beyond, externally, left out, on the outside, out, outdoors, out ofdoors, outwardly, past; concepts 586,772 Ant. inside …   New thesaurus

  • without — with|out [ wıð aut ] function word *** Without can be used in the following ways: as a preposition (followed by a noun): I can t see without my glasses. (followed by the ing form of a verb): She walked past without saying anything. as an adverb… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • without */*/*/ — UK [wɪðˈaʊt] / US adverb, preposition Summary: Without can be used in the following ways: as a preposition (followed by a noun): I can t see without my glasses. (followed by the ing form of a verb): She walked past without saying anything. as an… …   English dictionary

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