Trunk turtle
Trunk Trunk, n. [F. tronc, L. truncus, fr. truncus maimed, mutilated; perhaps akin to torquere to twist wrench, and E. torture. Trunk in the sense of proboscis is fr. F. trompe (the same word as trompe a trumpet), but has been confused in English with trunk the stem of a tree (see {Trump} a trumpet). Cf. {Truncate}.] 1. The stem, or body, of a tree, apart from its limbs and roots; the main stem, without the branches; stock; stalk. [1913 Webster]

About the mossy trunk I wound me soon, For, high from ground, the branches would require Thy utmost reach. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. The body of an animal, apart from the head and limbs. [1913 Webster]

3. The main body of anything; as, the trunk of a vein or of an artery, as distinct from the branches. [1913 Webster]

4. (Arch) That part of a pilaster which is between the base and the capital, corresponding to the shaft of a column. [1913 Webster]

5. (Zo["o]l.) That segment of the body of an insect which is between the head and abdomen, and bears the wings and legs; the thorax; the truncus. [1913 Webster]

6. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The proboscis of an elephant. (b) The proboscis of an insect. [1913 Webster]

7. A long tube through which pellets of clay, p?as, etc., are driven by the force of the breath. [1913 Webster]

He shot sugarplums them out of a trunk. --Howell. [1913 Webster]

8. A box or chest usually covered with leather, metal, or cloth, or sometimes made of leather, hide, or metal, for containing clothes or other goods; especially, one used to convey the effects of a traveler. [1913 Webster]

Locked up in chests and trunks. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

9. (Mining) A flume or sluice in which ores are separated from the slimes in which they are contained. [1913 Webster]

10. (Steam Engine) A large pipe forming the piston rod of a steam engine, of sufficient diameter to allow one end of the connecting rod to be attached to the crank, and the other end to pass within the pipe directly to the piston, thus making the engine more compact. [1913 Webster]

11. A long, large box, pipe, or conductor, made of plank or metal plates, for various uses, as for conveying air to a mine or to a furnace, water to a mill, grain to an elevator, etc. [1913 Webster]

{Trunk engine}, a marine engine, the piston rod of which is a trunk. See {Trunk}, 10.

{Trunk hose}, large breeches formerly worn, reaching to the knees.

{Trunk line}, the main line of a railway, canal, or route of conveyance.

{Trunk turtle} (Zo["o]l.), the leatherback. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • trunk turtle — noun : leatherback 1 …   Useful english dictionary

  • Trunk — Trunk, n. [F. tronc, L. truncus, fr. truncus maimed, mutilated; perhaps akin to torquere to twist wrench, and E. torture. Trunk in the sense of proboscis is fr. F. trompe (the same word as trompe a trumpet), but has been confused in English with… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Trunk engine — Trunk Trunk, n. [F. tronc, L. truncus, fr. truncus maimed, mutilated; perhaps akin to torquere to twist wrench, and E. torture. Trunk in the sense of proboscis is fr. F. trompe (the same word as trompe a trumpet), but has been confused in English …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Trunk hose — Trunk Trunk, n. [F. tronc, L. truncus, fr. truncus maimed, mutilated; perhaps akin to torquere to twist wrench, and E. torture. Trunk in the sense of proboscis is fr. F. trompe (the same word as trompe a trumpet), but has been confused in English …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Trunk line — Trunk Trunk, n. [F. tronc, L. truncus, fr. truncus maimed, mutilated; perhaps akin to torquere to twist wrench, and E. torture. Trunk in the sense of proboscis is fr. F. trompe (the same word as trompe a trumpet), but has been confused in English …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • trunk|back — «TRUHNGK BAK», noun. a large sea turtle of tropical waters; leatherback …   Useful english dictionary

  • turtle — turtle1 turtler, n. /terr tl/, n., pl. turtles, (esp. collectively) turtle, v., turtled, turtling. n. 1. any reptile of the order Testudines, comprising aquatic and terrestrial species having the trunk enclosed in a shell consisting of a dorsal… …   Universalium

  • turtle — I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English turtla, from Latin turtur Date: before 12th century archaic turtledove II. noun (plural turtles; also turtle) Usage: often attributive …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • turtle — tur·tle tərt əl n, pl turtles also turtle often attrib any of an order (Testudines) of terrestrial, freshwater, and marine reptiles that have a toothless horny beak and a shell of bony dermal plates usu. covered with horny shields enclosing the… …   Medical dictionary

  • turtle — tur·tle || tÉœrtl / tɜː n. reptile with a hard shell around the trunk of the body (living in freshwater, saltwater, or on land); turtle flesh; (Nautical) pocket in a spinnaker (large triangular sail) …   English contemporary dictionary

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