To trench at
Trench Trench, v. i. 1. To encroach; to intrench. [1913 Webster]

Does it not seem as if for a creature to challenge to itself a boundless attribute, were to trench upon the prerogative of the divine nature? --I. Taylor. [1913 Webster]

2. To have direction; to aim or tend. [R.] --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

{To trench at}, to make trenches against; to approach by trenches, as a town in besieging it. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Like powerful armies, trenching at a town By slow and silent, but resistless, sap. --Young. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Trench — Trench, v. i. 1. To encroach; to intrench. [1913 Webster] Does it not seem as if for a creature to challenge to itself a boundless attribute, were to trench upon the prerogative of the divine nature? I. Taylor. [1913 Webster] 2. To have… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Trench warfare — is a form of warfare where both combatants have fortified positions and fighting lines are static. Trench warfare arose when a revolution in firepower was not matched by similar advances in mobility. The result was a slow and grueling form of… …   Wikipedia

  • Trench map — A Trench map shows the trenches of the Great War, 1914 1918. Whilst all of the belligerents made or used maps of the trenches, this article refers mainly to those made by the British Army.The term Trench Map is used as the title of maps that… …   Wikipedia

  • Trench boot — The trench boot sometimes known as the Pershing boot was a combat boot used in World War I by American, French, and Belgian forces, made for the cold mud of trench warfare. EvolutionIntroductionThe 1917 Trench Boot was an adaptation of the boots… …   Wikipedia

  • trench — I. noun Etymology: Middle English trenche track cut through a wood, from Anglo French, act of cutting, ditch, from trencher, trenchier to cut, probably from Vulgar Latin *trinicare to cut in three, from Latin trini three each more at trine Date:… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Trench art — is commonly defined as any decorative item made by soldiers, prisoners of war or civilians, where the manufacture is directly linked to armed conflict or its consequences.Common articles that this includes are decorated shell and bullet casings… …   Wikipedia

  • Trench knife — Trench knives are either purpose made weapons, or are made from cut down (shortened) bayonets or swords, and intended for close quarter fighting, the design originating in the trench warfare of the First World War. They were particularly useful… …   Wikipedia

  • Trench railways — represented military adaptation of early 20th century railway technology to the problem of keeping soldiers supplied during the static trench warfare phase of World War I. The large concentrations of soldiers and artillery at the front lines… …   Wikipedia

  • Trench raiding club — Trench raiding clubs were homemade mêlée weapons used by both the Allies and the Central Powers during World War I. Clubs were used during night time trench raiding expeditions as a quiet and effective way of killing or wounding enemy soldiers.… …   Wikipedia

  • Trench rescue — is a highly specialized form of rescue, a subset of confined space rescue. Trench rescue involves shoring up the sides of a trench, and digging a trapped worker out of a collapsed ditch. The area around a collapse should not be approached by any… …   Wikipedia

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