To haul off
Haul Haul, v. i. 1. (Naut.) To change the direction of a ship by hauling the wind. See under {Haul}, v. t. [1913 Webster]

I . . . hauled up for it, and found it to be an island. --Cook. [1913 Webster]

2. To pull apart, as oxen sometimes do when yoked. [1913 Webster]

{To haul around} (Naut.), to shift to any point of the compass; -- said of the wind.

{To haul off} (Naut.), to sail closer to the wind, in order to get farther away from anything; hence, to withdraw; to draw back. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To pull off — Pull Pull, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pulled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pulling}.] [AS. pullian; cf. LG. pulen, and Gael. peall, piol, spiol.] 1. To draw, or attempt to draw, toward one; to draw forcibly. [1913 Webster] Ne er pull your hat upon your brows.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To draw off — draw draw (dr[add]), v. t. [imp. {Drew} (dr[udd]); p. p. {Drawn} (dr[add]n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Drawing}.] [OE. dra[yogh]en, drahen, draien, drawen, AS. dragan; akin to Icel. & Sw. draga, Dan. drage to draw, carry, and prob. to OS. dragan to bear,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To haul around — Haul Haul, v. i. 1. (Naut.) To change the direction of a ship by hauling the wind. See under {Haul}, v. t. [1913 Webster] I . . . hauled up for it, and found it to be an island. Cook. [1913 Webster] 2. To pull apart, as oxen sometimes do when… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • haul off and — US informal : to suddenly do (something specified) followed by a verb that expresses some kind of usually violent action She hauled off and punched him in the face. • • • Main Entry: ↑haul …   Useful english dictionary

  • haul off — verb take away by means of a vehicle They carted off the old furniture • Syn: ↑cart off, ↑cart away, ↑haul away • Hypernyms: ↑take away, ↑take out • Verb Frames …   Useful english dictionary

  • haul off — phrasal verb [transitive] Word forms haul off : present tense I/you/we/they haul off he/she/it hauls off present participle hauling off past tense hauled off past participle hauled off to take someone away to a place they do not want to go Most… …   English dictionary

  • To haul over the coals — Coal Coal (k[=o]l), n. [AS. col; akin to D. kool, OHG. chol, cholo, G. kohle, Icel. kol, pl., Sw. kol, Dan. kul; cf. Skr. jval to burn. Cf. {Kiln}, {Collier}.] 1. A thoroughly charred, and extinguished or still ignited, fragment from wood or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • haul off — verb a) To alter course so as to get farther away from an object. He just hauled off and socked him in the jaw. b) To leave …   Wiktionary

  • haul off — {v.} To move suddenly. Used with and usually before a verb like hit or kick . * /Ed hauled off and hit the other boy in the nose./ * /Lee hauled off and threw a touchdown pass./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • haul off — {v.} To move suddenly. Used with and usually before a verb like hit or kick . * /Ed hauled off and hit the other boy in the nose./ * /Lee hauled off and threw a touchdown pass./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

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