To pull apart
Pull Pull, v. i. To exert one's self in an act or motion of drawing or hauling; to tug; as, to pull at a rope. [1913 Webster]

{To pull apart}, to become separated by pulling; as, a rope will pull apart.

{To pull up}, to draw the reins; to stop; to halt.

{To pull through}, to come successfully to the end of a difficult undertaking, a dangerous sickness, or the like. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To pull apart — Разрывать …   Краткий толковый словарь по полиграфии

  • To pull through — Pull Pull, v. i. To exert one s self in an act or motion of drawing or hauling; to tug; as, to pull at a rope. [1913 Webster] {To pull apart}, to become separated by pulling; as, a rope will pull apart. {To pull up}, to draw the reins; to stop;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pull up — Pull Pull, v. i. To exert one s self in an act or motion of drawing or hauling; to tug; as, to pull at a rope. [1913 Webster] {To pull apart}, to become separated by pulling; as, a rope will pull apart. {To pull up}, to draw the reins; to stop;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pull a finch — Pull Pull, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pulled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pulling}.] [AS. pullian; cf. LG. pulen, and Gael. peall, piol, spiol.] 1. To draw, or attempt to draw, toward one; to draw forcibly. [1913 Webster] Ne er pull your hat upon your brows.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pull and haul — Pull Pull, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pulled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pulling}.] [AS. pullian; cf. LG. pulen, and Gael. peall, piol, spiol.] 1. To draw, or attempt to draw, toward one; to draw forcibly. [1913 Webster] Ne er pull your hat upon your brows.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pull down — Pull Pull, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pulled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pulling}.] [AS. pullian; cf. LG. pulen, and Gael. peall, piol, spiol.] 1. To draw, or attempt to draw, toward one; to draw forcibly. [1913 Webster] Ne er pull your hat upon your brows.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pull off — Pull Pull, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pulled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pulling}.] [AS. pullian; cf. LG. pulen, and Gael. peall, piol, spiol.] 1. To draw, or attempt to draw, toward one; to draw forcibly. [1913 Webster] Ne er pull your hat upon your brows.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pull apart — verb to open something by pulling on various parts of it …   Wiktionary

  • Pull — Pull, v. i. To exert one s self in an act or motion of drawing or hauling; to tug; as, to pull at a rope. [1913 Webster] {To pull apart}, to become separated by pulling; as, a rope will pull apart. {To pull up}, to draw the reins; to stop; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To tear a cat — Tear Tear (t[^a]r), v. t. [imp. {Tore} (t[=o]r), ((Obs. {Tare}) (t[^a]r); p. p. {Torn} (t[=o]rn); p. pr. & vb. n. {Tearing}.] [OE. teren, AS. teran; akin to OS. farterian to destroy, D. teren to consume, G. zerren to pull, to tear, zehren to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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