To go to sea
Sea Sea (s[=e]), n. [OE. see, AS. s[=ae]; akin to D. zee, OS. & OHG. s[=e]o, G. see, OFries. se, Dan. s["o], Sw. sj["o], Icel. s[ae]r, Goth. saiws, and perhaps to L. saevus fierce, savage. [root]151a.] 1. One of the larger bodies of salt water, less than an ocean, found on the earth's surface; a body of salt water of second rank, generally forming part of, or connecting with, an ocean or a larger sea; as, the Mediterranean Sea; the Sea of Marmora; the North Sea; the Carribean Sea. [1913 Webster]

2. An inland body of water, esp. if large or if salt or brackish; as, the Caspian Sea; the Sea of Aral; sometimes, a small fresh-water lake; as, the Sea of Galilee. [1913 Webster]

3. The ocean; the whole body of the salt water which covers a large part of the globe. [1913 Webster]

I marvel how the fishes live in the sea. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Ambiguous between sea and land The river horse and scaly crocodile. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

4. The swell of the ocean or other body of water in a high wind; motion or agitation of the water's surface; also, a single wave; a billow; as, there was a high sea after the storm; the vessel shipped a sea. [1913 Webster]

5. (Jewish Antiq.) A great brazen laver in the temple at Jerusalem; -- so called from its size. [1913 Webster]

He made a molten sea of ten cubits from brim to brim, round in compass, and five cubits the height thereof. --2 Chron. iv. 2. [1913 Webster]

6. Fig.: Anything resembling the sea in vastness; as, a sea of glory. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

All the space . . . was one sea of heads. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

Note: Sea is often used in the composition of words of obvious signification; as, sea-bathed, sea-beaten, sea-bound, sea-bred, sea-circled, sealike, sea-nursed, sea-tossed, sea-walled, sea-worn, and the like. It is also used either adjectively or in combination with substantives; as, sea bird, sea-bird, or seabird, sea acorn, or sea-acorn. [1913 Webster]

{At sea}, upon the ocean; away from land; figuratively, without landmarks for guidance; lost; at the mercy of circumstances. ``To say the old man was at sea would be too feeble an expression.'' --G. W. Cable

{At full sea} at the height of flood tide; hence, at the height. ``But now God's mercy was at full sea.'' --Jer. Taylor.

{Beyond seas}, or {Beyond the sea} or {Beyond the seas} (Law), out of the state, territory, realm, or country. --Wharton.

{Half seas over}, half drunk. [Colloq.] --Spectator.

{Heavy sea}, a sea in which the waves run high.

{Long sea}, a sea characterized by the uniform and steady motion of long and extensive waves.

{Short sea}, a sea in which the waves are short, broken, and irregular, so as to produce a tumbling or jerking motion.

{To go to sea}, to adopt the calling or occupation of a sailor. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • To stand to sea — Stand Stand (st[a^]nd), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Stood} (st[oo^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Standing}.] [OE. standen; AS. standan; akin to OFries. stonda, st[=a]n, D. staan, OS. standan, st[=a]n, OHG. stantan, st[=a]n, G. stehen, Icel. standa, Dan. staae,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To stand to — Stand Stand (st[a^]nd), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Stood} (st[oo^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Standing}.] [OE. standen; AS. standan; akin to OFries. stonda, st[=a]n, D. staan, OS. standan, st[=a]n, OHG. stantan, st[=a]n, G. stehen, Icel. standa, Dan. staae,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To stand to reason — Stand Stand (st[a^]nd), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Stood} (st[oo^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Standing}.] [OE. standen; AS. standan; akin to OFries. stonda, st[=a]n, D. staan, OS. standan, st[=a]n, OHG. stantan, st[=a]n, G. stehen, Icel. standa, Dan. staae,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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  • To work to windward — Work Work (w[^u]rk), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Worked} (w[^u]rkt), or {Wrought} (r[add]t); p. pr. & vb. n. {Working}.] [AS. wyrcean (imp. worthe, wrohte, p. p. geworht, gewroht); akin to OFries. werka, wirka, OS. wirkian, D. werken, G. wirken, Icel.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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