bicarbureted hydrogen
Ethylene Eth"yl*ene ([e^]th"[i^]l*[=e]n), n. [From {Ethyl}.] (Chem.) A colorless, gaseous hydrocarbon, {C2H4}, forming an important ingredient of illuminating gas, and also obtained by the action of concentrated sulphuric acid in alcohol. It is an unsaturated compound and combines directly with chlorine and bromine to form oily liquids (Dutch liquid), -- hence called {olefiant gas}. Called also {ethene}, {elayl}, and formerly, {bicarbureted hydrogen}. [1913 Webster]

{Ethylene series} (Chem.), the series of unsaturated hydrocarbons of which ethylene is the type, and represented by the general formula {CnH2n}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Bicarbureted hydrogen — Hydrogen Hy dro*gen, n. [Hydro , 1 + gen: cf. F. hydrog[ e]ne. So called because water is generated by its combustion. See {Hydra}.] (Chem.) A gaseous element, colorless, tasteless, and odorless, the lightest known substance, being fourteen and a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hydrogen — Hy dro*gen, n. [Hydro , 1 + gen: cf. F. hydrog[ e]ne. So called because water is generated by its combustion. See {Hydra}.] (Chem.) A gaseous element, colorless, tasteless, and odorless, the lightest known substance, being fourteen and a half… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hydrogen dioxide — Hydrogen Hy dro*gen, n. [Hydro , 1 + gen: cf. F. hydrog[ e]ne. So called because water is generated by its combustion. See {Hydra}.] (Chem.) A gaseous element, colorless, tasteless, and odorless, the lightest known substance, being fourteen and a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hydrogen oxide — Hydrogen Hy dro*gen, n. [Hydro , 1 + gen: cf. F. hydrog[ e]ne. So called because water is generated by its combustion. See {Hydra}.] (Chem.) A gaseous element, colorless, tasteless, and odorless, the lightest known substance, being fourteen and a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hydrogen sulphide — Hydrogen Hy dro*gen, n. [Hydro , 1 + gen: cf. F. hydrog[ e]ne. So called because water is generated by its combustion. See {Hydra}.] (Chem.) A gaseous element, colorless, tasteless, and odorless, the lightest known substance, being fourteen and a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Carbureted hydrogen gas — Hydrogen Hy dro*gen, n. [Hydro , 1 + gen: cf. F. hydrog[ e]ne. So called because water is generated by its combustion. See {Hydra}.] (Chem.) A gaseous element, colorless, tasteless, and odorless, the lightest known substance, being fourteen and a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • sulphureted hydrogen — Hydrogen Hy dro*gen, n. [Hydro , 1 + gen: cf. F. hydrog[ e]ne. So called because water is generated by its combustion. See {Hydra}.] (Chem.) A gaseous element, colorless, tasteless, and odorless, the lightest known substance, being fourteen and a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • H2O2 — Hydrogen Hy dro*gen, n. [Hydro , 1 + gen: cf. F. hydrog[ e]ne. So called because water is generated by its combustion. See {Hydra}.] (Chem.) A gaseous element, colorless, tasteless, and odorless, the lightest known substance, being fourteen and a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • H2S — Hydrogen Hy dro*gen, n. [Hydro , 1 + gen: cf. F. hydrog[ e]ne. So called because water is generated by its combustion. See {Hydra}.] (Chem.) A gaseous element, colorless, tasteless, and odorless, the lightest known substance, being fourteen and a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hydrogenium — Hydrogen Hy dro*gen, n. [Hydro , 1 + gen: cf. F. hydrog[ e]ne. So called because water is generated by its combustion. See {Hydra}.] (Chem.) A gaseous element, colorless, tasteless, and odorless, the lightest known substance, being fourteen and a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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