Shrewder
Shrewd Shrewd, a. [Compar. {Shrewder}; superl. {Shrewdest}.] [Originally the p. p. of shrew, v.t.] 1. Inclining to shrew; disposing to curse or scold; hence, vicious; malicious; evil; wicked; mischievous; vexatious; rough; unfair; shrewish. [Obs.] --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

[Egypt] hath many shrewd havens, because of the great rocks that ben strong and dangerous to pass by. --Sir J. Mandeville. [1913 Webster]

Every of this happy number That have endured shrewd days and nights with us. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. Artful; wily; cunning; arch. [1913 Webster]

These women are shrewd tempters with their tongues. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. Able or clever in practical affairs; sharp in business; astute; sharp-witted; sagacious; keen; as, a shrewd observer; a shrewd design; a shrewd reply. [1913 Webster]

Professing to despise the ill opinion of mankind creates a shrewd suspicion that we have deserved it. --Secker. [1913 Webster]

Syn: Keen; critical; subtle; artful; astute; sagacious; discerning; acute; penetrating.

Usage: {Shrewd}, {Sagacious}. One who is shrewd is keen to detect errors, to penetrate disguises, to foresee and guard against the selfishness of others. Shrewd is a word of less dignity than sagacious, which implies a comprehensive as well as penetrating mind, whereas shrewd does not. [1913 Webster] -- {Shrewd"ly}, adv. -- {Shrewd"ness}, n. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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