Rid
Ride Ride, v. i. [imp. {Rode} (r[=o]d) ({Rid} [r[i^]d], archaic); p. p. {Ridden}({Rid}, archaic); p. pr. & vb. n. {Riding}.] [AS. r[=i]dan; akin to LG. riden, D. rijden, G. reiten, OHG. r[=i]tan, Icel. r[=i][eth]a, Sw. rida, Dan. ride; cf. L. raeda a carriage, which is from a Celtic word. Cf. {Road}.] 1. To be carried on the back of an animal, as a horse. [1913 Webster]

To-morrow, when ye riden by the way. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

Let your master ride on before, and do you gallop after him. --Swift. [1913 Webster]

2. To be borne in a carriage; as, to ride in a coach, in a car, and the like. See Synonym, below. [1913 Webster]

The richest inhabitants exhibited their wealth, not by riding in gilden carriages, but by walking the streets with trains of servants. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

3. To be borne or in a fluid; to float; to lie. [1913 Webster]

Men once walked where ships at anchor ride. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

4. To be supported in motion; to rest. [1913 Webster]

Strong as the exletree On which heaven rides. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

On whose foolish honesty My practices ride easy! --Shak. [1913 Webster]

5. To manage a horse, as an equestrian. [1913 Webster]

He rode, he fenced, he moved with graceful ease. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

6. To support a rider, as a horse; to move under the saddle; as, a horse rides easy or hard, slow or fast. [1913 Webster]

{To ride easy} (Naut.), to lie at anchor without violent pitching or straining at the cables.

{To ride hard} (Naut.), to pitch violently.

{To ride out}. (a) To go upon a military expedition. [Obs.] --Chaucer. (b) To ride in the open air. [Colloq.]

{To ride to hounds}, to ride behind, and near to, the hounds in hunting. [1913 Webster]

Syn: Drive.

Usage: {Ride}, {Drive}. Ride originally meant (and is so used throughout the English Bible) to be carried on horseback or in a vehicle of any kind. At present in England, drive is the word applied in most cases to progress in a carriage; as, a drive around the park, etc.; while ride is appropriated to progress on a horse. Johnson seems to sanction this distinction by giving ``to travel on horseback'' as the leading sense of ride; though he adds ``to travel in a vehicle'' as a secondary sense. This latter use of the word still occurs to some extent; as, the queen rides to Parliament in her coach of state; to ride in an omnibus. [1913 Webster]

``Will you ride over or drive?'' said Lord Willowby to his quest, after breakfast that morning. --W. Black. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Rid — Rid, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Rid} or {Ridded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Ridding}.] [OE. ridden, redden, AS. hreddan to deliver, liberate; akin to D. & LG. redden, G. retten, Dan. redde, Sw. r[ a]dda, and perhaps to Skr. ?rath to loosen.] 1. To save; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Rid — Rid, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Rid} or {Ridded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Ridding}.] [OE. ridden, redden, AS. hreddan to deliver, liberate; akin to D. & LG. redden, G. retten, Dan. redde, Sw. r[ a]dda, and perhaps to Skr. ?rath to loosen.] 1. To save; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • rid — rid1 [rid] vt. rid or ridded, ridding [ME ridden, earlier ruden < ON rythja, to clear (land), akin to OE ryddan, OHG riuten < IE * reudh < base * reu , to tear up, dig out > RIP1, RUG] 1. to free, clear, relieve, or disencumber, as of …   English World dictionary

  • rid — RID, riduri, s.n. Încreţitură a pielii obrazului; zbârcitură, cută, creţ. – Din fr. ride. Trimis de RACAI, 22.11.2003. Sursa: DEX 98  RID s. creţ, cută, dungă, încreţitură, zbârcitură, (pop.) zbârceală, zbârci, (prin Transilv.) ranţ, (fig.)… …   Dicționar Român

  • rid — The past tense and past participle are now normally rid rather than ridded, but ridded occurs occasionally in active constructions such as He ridded the stable of flies. Rid must be used in constructions of the type I thought myself well rid of… …   Modern English usage

  • rid — ► VERB (ridding; past and past part. rid) 1) (rid of) make (someone or something) free of (an unwanted person or thing). 2) (be (or get) rid of) be freed or relieved of. ORIGIN Old Norse …   English terms dictionary

  • Rid — Rid, imp. & p. p. of {Ride}, v. i. [Archaic] [1913 Webster] He rid to the end of the village, where he alighted. Thackeray. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • RID — may refer to: *Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf *Isaiah ben Maldi di Trani (the Elder) *Retrieve Information for Display *Relative ID *The Royal Institute Dictionary of Thailand *International Rule for Transport of Dangerous Substances by… …   Wikipedia

  • rid — rid, clear, unburden, disabuse, purge are comparable when they mean to set a person or thing free of something that encumbers. Rid is a rather general term but is likely to refer to concrete or specific matters which are burdensome or pestiferous …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • RID — steht für: Radionuclide Identifying Device, ein Messgerät zur Analyse und Identifizierung von ionisierender Strahlung Rechnerinterne Darstellung, mathematisches Datenmodell eines CAD Modells Recorder Identification Code, eine Kennnummer für CD… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • rid — index dislodge, eject (evict), extirpate, free (relieved from a burden), relieve (free from burden), relinquish …   Law dictionary

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