Poles of the earth
Pole Pole, n. [L. polus, Gr. ? a pivot or hinge on which anything turns, an axis, a pole; akin to ? to move: cf. F. p[^o]le.] 1. Either extremity of an axis of a sphere; especially, one of the extremities of the earth's axis; as, the north pole. [1913 Webster]

2. (Spherics) A point upon the surface of a sphere equally distant from every part of the circumference of a great circle; or the point in which a diameter of the sphere perpendicular to the plane of such circle meets the surface. Such a point is called the pole of that circle; as, the pole of the horizon; the pole of the ecliptic; the pole of a given meridian. [1913 Webster]

3. (Physics) One of the opposite or contrasted parts or directions in which a polar force is manifested; a point of maximum intensity of a force which has two such points, or which has polarity; as, the poles of a magnet; the north pole of a needle. [1913 Webster]

4. The firmament; the sky. [Poetic] [1913 Webster]

Shoots against the dusky pole. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

5. (Geom.) See {Polarity}, and {Polar}, n. [1913 Webster]

{Magnetic pole}. See under {Magnetic}.

{Poles of the earth}, or {Terrestrial poles} (Geog.), the two opposite points on the earth's surface through which its axis passes.

{Poles of the heavens}, or {Celestial poles}, the two opposite points in the celestial sphere which coincide with the earth's axis produced, and about which the heavens appear to revolve. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

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